Jim Salvas

Jim Salvas

Lives in United States West Chester, PA, United States
Works as a Photography/Writing
Has a website at camerajim.com
Joined on Mar 24, 2006
About me:

Serious photographer for 60+ years.

Comments

Total: 223, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Have your say: Best high-end compact of 2016 (91 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jim Salvas: I don't want to vote. That hasn't been working out well recently.

Just the opposite.

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2016 at 20:48 UTC
On article Have your say: Best high-end compact of 2016 (91 comments in total)

I don't want to vote. That hasn't been working out well recently.

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2016 at 05:51 UTC as 11th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

Jim Salvas: Price is relative to what you want and can get from a camera. For me, m43 and Olympus hit the sweet spot, as I have been using the system successfully for three years in part-time professional work and for personal images. I sometimes exhibit my images and enter competitions. The payoff for me has been tremendous and an extra few hundred dollars tacked onto a new, advanced body isn't going to keep me away from upgrading.

Besides, the system cost, in both weight and dollars are more important to me than the cost of the body. Since everyone is comparing this Olympus unfavorably to the D500 (before the full reviews of the this new model), let's do a comparison. Since these are action-oriented cameras, you want a fast, moderate tele lens. For the E-M1 II, mount the 40-150/2.8 PRO. For the D500, the new 70-200/2.8E lens. The Olympus weighs 1,324g and costs $3,500. The Nikon weighs 2,290g and costs $4,600. Which can produce good photos, more often, in your hands?

Horses for courses. I rarely find myself looking for a more shallow DOF. I shoot headshots at f4, to ensure the whole head is in focus. I use focus stacking for macros and product shots and even some landscapes, where I want everything in focus. Shallow DOF is a nice little tool which will keep your photos from looking like they were shot with a phone, but it's not for me.

Link | Posted on Nov 30, 2016 at 16:02 UTC
On article Cokin launches vintage-styled Riviera Classic tripod (92 comments in total)

Tiltall?

Link | Posted on Nov 29, 2016 at 14:26 UTC as 15th comment
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1244 comments in total)

It appears to me this camera is suffering a torture of a thousand cuts because of its slow introduction. The basic details were known months ago, it was then introduced at Photokina with no camera availability, it was then introduced to the press on an Iceland junket (wrong place and time to intro an action-oriented camera) and is now being reviewed without access to adequate RAW processing. And STILL, it is not in the hands of its intended customers, who just might be able to tell us something about its usability. Many of the 900 comments here have pronounced it dead on arrival, but it has not yet arrived.

Link | Posted on Nov 25, 2016 at 16:54 UTC as 69th comment | 1 reply

I would love to control a bunch of Elinchrom strobes with my little PM2. Just because.

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2016 at 02:11 UTC as 4th comment
In reply to:

Jim Salvas: Price is relative to what you want and can get from a camera. For me, m43 and Olympus hit the sweet spot, as I have been using the system successfully for three years in part-time professional work and for personal images. I sometimes exhibit my images and enter competitions. The payoff for me has been tremendous and an extra few hundred dollars tacked onto a new, advanced body isn't going to keep me away from upgrading.

Besides, the system cost, in both weight and dollars are more important to me than the cost of the body. Since everyone is comparing this Olympus unfavorably to the D500 (before the full reviews of the this new model), let's do a comparison. Since these are action-oriented cameras, you want a fast, moderate tele lens. For the E-M1 II, mount the 40-150/2.8 PRO. For the D500, the new 70-200/2.8E lens. The Olympus weighs 1,324g and costs $3,500. The Nikon weighs 2,290g and costs $4,600. Which can produce good photos, more often, in your hands?

Less weight means you carry your camera more often and/or you carry a more complete kit. You take more photos and have greater versatility. So, yeah, less weight equals better images.

Link | Posted on Nov 22, 2016 at 14:48 UTC
In reply to:

Jim Salvas: Price is relative to what you want and can get from a camera. For me, m43 and Olympus hit the sweet spot, as I have been using the system successfully for three years in part-time professional work and for personal images. I sometimes exhibit my images and enter competitions. The payoff for me has been tremendous and an extra few hundred dollars tacked onto a new, advanced body isn't going to keep me away from upgrading.

Besides, the system cost, in both weight and dollars are more important to me than the cost of the body. Since everyone is comparing this Olympus unfavorably to the D500 (before the full reviews of the this new model), let's do a comparison. Since these are action-oriented cameras, you want a fast, moderate tele lens. For the E-M1 II, mount the 40-150/2.8 PRO. For the D500, the new 70-200/2.8E lens. The Olympus weighs 1,324g and costs $3,500. The Nikon weighs 2,290g and costs $4,600. Which can produce good photos, more often, in your hands?

What do you mean I "cannot compare a F2.8 full frame lens and a F2.8 m43 lens." I just did. ;-)

Besides, you just brought FF equivalence into this for no reason at all.

Not everything is about aperture equivalence. There is also weight, and stabilization and general usability. If you want equivalence, be sure to include the equivalent weight of a tripod and no tripod.

Link | Posted on Nov 21, 2016 at 18:27 UTC
In reply to:

Jim Salvas: Price is relative to what you want and can get from a camera. For me, m43 and Olympus hit the sweet spot, as I have been using the system successfully for three years in part-time professional work and for personal images. I sometimes exhibit my images and enter competitions. The payoff for me has been tremendous and an extra few hundred dollars tacked onto a new, advanced body isn't going to keep me away from upgrading.

Besides, the system cost, in both weight and dollars are more important to me than the cost of the body. Since everyone is comparing this Olympus unfavorably to the D500 (before the full reviews of the this new model), let's do a comparison. Since these are action-oriented cameras, you want a fast, moderate tele lens. For the E-M1 II, mount the 40-150/2.8 PRO. For the D500, the new 70-200/2.8E lens. The Olympus weighs 1,324g and costs $3,500. The Nikon weighs 2,290g and costs $4,600. Which can produce good photos, more often, in your hands?

I was speaking of the new version of the Nikon. It is now selling for $2,797 at B&H. I'm not aware of anyone discounting that lens to $1,700.

You can talk all the equivalence you want, but the Oly combo should shoot head to head with the Nikon pair in real world situations, given that it has 1-1/2 stops more stabilization and weighs two pounds less. We'll see, I guess, when the full reviews come out.

Link | Posted on Nov 21, 2016 at 18:07 UTC

Price is relative to what you want and can get from a camera. For me, m43 and Olympus hit the sweet spot, as I have been using the system successfully for three years in part-time professional work and for personal images. I sometimes exhibit my images and enter competitions. The payoff for me has been tremendous and an extra few hundred dollars tacked onto a new, advanced body isn't going to keep me away from upgrading.

Besides, the system cost, in both weight and dollars are more important to me than the cost of the body. Since everyone is comparing this Olympus unfavorably to the D500 (before the full reviews of the this new model), let's do a comparison. Since these are action-oriented cameras, you want a fast, moderate tele lens. For the E-M1 II, mount the 40-150/2.8 PRO. For the D500, the new 70-200/2.8E lens. The Olympus weighs 1,324g and costs $3,500. The Nikon weighs 2,290g and costs $4,600. Which can produce good photos, more often, in your hands?

Link | Posted on Nov 21, 2016 at 17:27 UTC as 53rd comment | 15 replies
On article 2016 Roundup: $1200-2000 ILCs part 1 - Crop-Sensor (386 comments in total)
In reply to:

FuhTeng: Are you a:
- Hipster? PEN-F
- New enthusiast with no existing lens/system limitations with a lot of money, and you're aiming for a small-ish system? Fuji twins
- Legacy Canon shooter? 7D II, unless you don't shoot sports/wildlife, then the 80D
- Legacy Nikon shooter? D7200 unless you REALLY need the superior AF and burst of the D500
- Wealthy and ignorant? Leica M. T is for wannabees.
- A professional videographer without a professional budget? GH4
- Tiny sensor fan-child with a lot of m4/3 glass? EM1 II.
- Annoyed Sony owner who REALLY needs IBIS and touchscreen? a6500
- Pentaxian? Yeah, right, all four of you already have a K1.

Thanks. I shot that by putting the camera on its back, next to the trunk and then stepped outside the tree and ran the camera from my phone by wifi. Otherwise, I would have been in the shot.

Link | Posted on Nov 7, 2016 at 22:21 UTC
On article 2016 Roundup: $1200-2000 ILCs part 1 - Crop-Sensor (386 comments in total)
In reply to:

FuhTeng: Are you a:
- Hipster? PEN-F
- New enthusiast with no existing lens/system limitations with a lot of money, and you're aiming for a small-ish system? Fuji twins
- Legacy Canon shooter? 7D II, unless you don't shoot sports/wildlife, then the 80D
- Legacy Nikon shooter? D7200 unless you REALLY need the superior AF and burst of the D500
- Wealthy and ignorant? Leica M. T is for wannabees.
- A professional videographer without a professional budget? GH4
- Tiny sensor fan-child with a lot of m4/3 glass? EM1 II.
- Annoyed Sony owner who REALLY needs IBIS and touchscreen? a6500
- Pentaxian? Yeah, right, all four of you already have a K1.

@DWinter Sure. This one took first prize for photography in the 2016 Plein Air Brandywine Valley competition (a $2,000 prize).

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jimsalvas/30284489260/in/dateposted-public/

The other $1,000 prize was as Artists' Choice, selected by all 85 participants for the best overall exhibit (10 prints). Most of those are on my Flickr page.

Link | Posted on Nov 7, 2016 at 21:54 UTC
On article 2016 Roundup: $1200-2000 ILCs part 1 - Crop-Sensor (386 comments in total)
In reply to:

FuhTeng: Are you a:
- Hipster? PEN-F
- New enthusiast with no existing lens/system limitations with a lot of money, and you're aiming for a small-ish system? Fuji twins
- Legacy Canon shooter? 7D II, unless you don't shoot sports/wildlife, then the 80D
- Legacy Nikon shooter? D7200 unless you REALLY need the superior AF and burst of the D500
- Wealthy and ignorant? Leica M. T is for wannabees.
- A professional videographer without a professional budget? GH4
- Tiny sensor fan-child with a lot of m4/3 glass? EM1 II.
- Annoyed Sony owner who REALLY needs IBIS and touchscreen? a6500
- Pentaxian? Yeah, right, all four of you already have a K1.

I may be pretentious, but how dare you call me delightful!

Link | Posted on Nov 7, 2016 at 19:31 UTC
On article 2016 Roundup: $1200-2000 ILCs part 1 - Crop-Sensor (386 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike FL: SONY a6300 is too cheaper to get in $1.2-2K, but SONY a6500?

@Richard Butler - Please, please post some tests of the E-M1 II shot with a current generation lens and at apertures appropriate for m43. Nobody else is doing that. Appropriate field tests of the hi-res mode are also greatly anticipated.

Link | Posted on Nov 7, 2016 at 19:29 UTC
On article 2016 Roundup: $1200-2000 ILCs part 1 - Crop-Sensor (386 comments in total)
In reply to:

FuhTeng: Are you a:
- Hipster? PEN-F
- New enthusiast with no existing lens/system limitations with a lot of money, and you're aiming for a small-ish system? Fuji twins
- Legacy Canon shooter? 7D II, unless you don't shoot sports/wildlife, then the 80D
- Legacy Nikon shooter? D7200 unless you REALLY need the superior AF and burst of the D500
- Wealthy and ignorant? Leica M. T is for wannabees.
- A professional videographer without a professional budget? GH4
- Tiny sensor fan-child with a lot of m4/3 glass? EM1 II.
- Annoyed Sony owner who REALLY needs IBIS and touchscreen? a6500
- Pentaxian? Yeah, right, all four of you already have a K1.

I guess this 76-year-old aging hippie is now a hipster, because I've been shooting with a Pen F. Cool (or is that a non-hipster word now?).

Anyway, this old hipster just won two major awards by shooting with that Pen F ($3,000 in prize money), sold four prints at exhibition and booked two corporate headshot gigs.

How are you doing?

Link | Posted on Nov 7, 2016 at 18:26 UTC
On article DPReview Asks: What was your first camera? (762 comments in total)

Kodak Duaflex, 1951. I still have it.

Link | Posted on Nov 4, 2016 at 14:15 UTC as 571st comment
In reply to:

Jim Salvas: How about ONE hi-res photo? It's a standout feature of this camera, supposedly much improved to work with at least slowly-moving subjects, but almost nobody has shown a hi-res photo from this junket.

One reviewer posted a couple of hi-res photos from the field, but at reduced viewing size and Imaging Resource has hi-res studio shots posted. Sadly, I have found nobody who has posted full size, field photos at h-res.

Link | Posted on Nov 2, 2016 at 15:47 UTC

How about ONE hi-res photo? It's a standout feature of this camera, supposedly much improved to work with at least slowly-moving subjects, but almost nobody has shown a hi-res photo from this junket.

Link | Posted on Nov 2, 2016 at 15:21 UTC as 70th comment | 2 replies

I just had some fun comparing this Phase One in the studio scene tool with the Pen F's pixel shift mode. Not bad at all, especially when you compare to the Pen F's jpegs.

Despite the limitations of the pixel shift mode, I'm a pretty happy camper with this refurb Pen F which cost me all of $800.

Link | Posted on Oct 3, 2016 at 16:07 UTC as 88th comment
In reply to:

gbdz: "Aerial surveyors" that would not be the military, would it?
Just wondering who exactly might have enough money&motivation to support this pharaonic picture making behemoth...the answer is obvious. Denmark is a NATO country also.

Another user who has been longing for "good enough" resolution for their digital imaging are the cytologists, the guys who make diagnoses from biopsies. (My sister used to be the chairman of the Finnish Society of Pathologists, that's how I know)

There is money in the medical industry but sadly, not for cytological diagnostics.
I bet something's going to give in once the surgeons start demanding online images from the frozen sections they take during their operations.

Does this thing go to infrared? If it does, the star men will soon be knock-knock-knocking of Leaf's door.

Imagine what kind of stress this thing causes to make-up artists!

And the joy the guys selling supercomputers will feel after the well-to-do pixelpeepers have "unpacked"...

Military aerial surveillance is now in the gigapixel range. They don't need the modest resolution of this camera.

Link | Posted on Oct 3, 2016 at 15:48 UTC
Total: 223, showing: 1 – 20
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