ewelch

Lives in United States Carlsbad, CA, United States
Works as a Photo Editor
Has a website at http://www.jphotog.com
Joined on Apr 6, 2003
About me:

Photo Editor for the Gemological Institute of America. If you shoot gems - why haven't
you called me? (Or mines and factories, and other stuff related to gem/jewelry industry.)
I use a 1Ds Mark II at work, but thinking about getting a D200 or D2X for myself.

Comments

Total: 271, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Ming Thein joins Hasselblad as Chief of Strategy (283 comments in total)
In reply to:

bluevellet: Chief of strategy?

Ming Thein: "How about producing a camera that isn't ridiculously overpriced for a change"

Hasselblad: "You're fired!"

Yeah, except he really likes expensive cameras. The guy was in finance and private equity.

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2017 at 14:50 UTC
On article Ming Thein joins Hasselblad as Chief of Strategy (283 comments in total)
In reply to:

Triplet Perar: Ming? Pentax has had The Beatles; Ringo, John, Paul, and George.
PS. Those random Nikons they had on occasions were Jimmy's (From Led Zeppelin).

And Harry Benson's photos of the Beatles (pillow fight) were shot with Minoltas. Remember them?

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2017 at 14:47 UTC
On article Ming Thein joins Hasselblad as Chief of Strategy (283 comments in total)
In reply to:

DanielFjall: He's a master when it comes to tech spec. But photography? I don't know

He's good. As a photo editor, I look at photos all day long. And way too many photo bloggers and YouTubers are hacks. Ming is the real deal.

Link | Posted on Mar 29, 2017 at 15:38 UTC
In reply to:

photomedium: To paraphrase Nixon, if it's a photographer doing it, it is not a crime.

But do they really need a grant to fix it? Just send in park rangers with rakes and make them fix it as they double back out of there.

No doubt with cuts to the Department of the Interior, and plans to start drilling and mining in protected areas, they'd just say it's a waste to fix, because it's nothing compared to what's coming.

Link | Posted on Mar 15, 2017 at 14:35 UTC
In reply to:

karlkk: mirrorless are a bad invention - no future.

Mirrorless is going to kill DSLRs. Smaller, better in almost every way. And now with the M-1 Mark II, speed and AF are no longer issues.

And try to get IBIS into a big DSLR. It can't possibly compete. Currently, the M1 Mark II's stabilization is limited by the earth's rotation.

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2017 at 15:06 UTC
On article Nine tips to help you win at photography competitions (100 comments in total)

#11: Don't assume that because the subject is great, that it follows that the photo is great as well.

Link | Posted on Mar 6, 2017 at 16:32 UTC as 6th comment
In reply to:

cosinaphile: selfies are a indicator of our mindless self absorption and the general decay of the human psyche , mind , intelligence, ego,and purpose , these drones are an airborne extension of that disease

america has a love affair with itself and admires self absorbed a s s h a t s with egos that have a pathological overabundance ...... actually recognized as a disease .....Narcissistic personality disorder .... its so common i wouldn't be surprised if america elected one of these ....ummmm....., wastes of a baseball cap , to its highest office one day...

People have been doing it since almost the start of small easy-to-use cameras. The name, though does imply excessive self-regard, and no longer mostly about the place you are at. More like how lucky for the place that you grace it with your presence. Fits the current narrative pretty well.

Link | Posted on Mar 3, 2017 at 14:19 UTC
On article Sony FE 100mm F2.8 STF bokeh demystified (355 comments in total)
In reply to:

StevenE: Great lens if you shoot mainly environmental portraits, in bright areas with flash. The light loss is enormous compared to an 85 f/1.4 .... four full stops

Actually that is not the case. Wide apertures allow you to nail focus much easier because the subject pops in and out of focus more decisively. No matter what the aperture used in the final image. But focus accuracy is there regardless. So the wider the lens, the easier to manually focus. And no doubt, most AF systems benefit too.

Link | Posted on Feb 17, 2017 at 19:25 UTC
In reply to:

Aroart: Nikon should focus all its energy on making a d6 successor that rival mirrorless ..

The only way to do that is to throw out mirrors.

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2017 at 19:16 UTC
In reply to:

Josh Leavitt: If Nikon partnered with Samsung to put their 1" DL sensor technology into the Galaxy phone lines, or even a subset of the Galaxy phones, I'm pretty sure it would reshape the way professional photographers view smartphones. The trick would be making a pancake telescoping zoom lens compact enough to not otherwise detract from the "phablet" looks and ergonomics. I'd take a 1" sensor smartphone over a dual 6mm sensor smartphone any day of the week - especially if it included proprietary Nikon imaging technology.

No phone is close to big enough to handle a one-inch sensor. Not even massive Samsung phones.

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2017 at 19:15 UTC
In reply to:

PPierre: Please Nikon, stop being ridiculous and release an F mount FF mirrorless camera. Stop making strange marketing decisions.

Yes, this. Or MFT. But these odd-sized-sensor cameras have to stop. Nikon is too small to throw things up on the wall and see what sticks. Go with winning formulas for others, or stop trying to do something new and do what you do right. Unfortunately for Nikon, full frame is doomed in the long run because of size and weight. Smaller sensors are now getting so good that they eventually will make full frame cameras a waste based on diminishing returns.

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2017 at 19:14 UTC

Worthless, meaningless survey to harvest emails.

Link | Posted on Feb 10, 2017 at 15:56 UTC as 6th comment | 2 replies
On article Adobe Creative Suite 6 has been officially retired (351 comments in total)
In reply to:

D200_4me: Sorry if this is obvious from reading the story but I just wanted to make sure. I currently have the latest standalone version of lightroom 6 but does this announcement mean I will not be able to buy a standalone version of Lightroom 7 whenever that comes out?

I think Lightroom remains as the sole exception. Did Adobe explicitly say Lightroom is now a CS exclusive too?

Link | Posted on Jan 30, 2017 at 20:03 UTC

I have seen his work as long as I've been involved in photography. (Amateur 1978, Pro 1984.) He's definitely one of the masters. Good stuff!

Link | Posted on Jan 30, 2017 at 17:51 UTC as 5th comment
On article Hopes of Kodachrome relaunch put on ice (172 comments in total)
In reply to:

AndersSJ: Why haven't anybody seen the prosperous market in film manufacturing and processing and started a crowd finding project?

Or is it just whining?

That's like asking why doesn't someone crowd fund a colony on Mars? The manufacture of film is vastly difficult and required 100 years of research and development to make it what it was in the 90s.

Sure, a violin and viola player invented Kodachrome, but it took Kodak to put it on the market.

Link | Posted on Jan 27, 2017 at 15:51 UTC
On article Hopes of Kodachrome relaunch put on ice (172 comments in total)
In reply to:

quietrich: To those commenters proclaiming the death of film I can say that, from a UK perspective, it's far from the truth. Every photography student begins their education by shooting and developing B&W film, and hand-printing images from the negs. In our college we supply film to students at cost price, and sell at least 1000 rolls per year - in one college. Most of the art photographers I know (that's photographers producing work to show in galleries) use film at least some of the time, if not exclusively.
Having said that, digital has completely replaced film in the commercial sector. The only reason that most of us shot colour reversal film back in the day, was that publishers insisted on it because it gave sharper results when printed. So whilst the future of colour slide film looks pretty bleak, colour and mono negative film is, and will continue to be, a thriving business.

I used to think like that. But I have come to terms with the superiority of the digital workflow post shooting that makes clearly better, more accurate results. Of course, art isn't always interested in efficiency or accuracy. So some areas will go slower than others into digital adoption.

But the single most important reason to give up chemical processing is simple. The environment is damaged by it.

Link | Posted on Jan 27, 2017 at 15:48 UTC
On article Hopes of Kodachrome relaunch put on ice (172 comments in total)
In reply to:

barry reid: I didn't lament Kodachrome's demise and don't mind it's not coming back. I'm from the interim generation - I never used a darkroom, instead scanning my shots as soon as I got serious in the 90s. I continued with this approach and manual focus until could afford a secondhand FF DSLR in about 2006.

I shot a few rolls of the 'legendary' Kodachrome around the early 2000s and was far from impressed. While the slides look nice projected something about the structure made it very hard to match the results from scanning E6 films on My Nikon Coolscan III or V.

Most E6 and C-41 Rendered scans which printed every bit as well? and possibly better in the highlights, compared to the Eos 1Ds I moved to. Kodachrome, however, could not. Perhaps I missed a trick and maybe an Imacon would do better but that's my experience as a late 90s/early 2000s film shooter.

Kodachrome and Dye Transfer, or Cibachrome done right, would beat E6 every time. But even with the Coolscan, if you have experience, you can make exceptionally good stuff with most films.

The benefit of Kodachrome, besides longevity, was that it was three layers of black and white film. Each layer could be much thinner than film with the dye couplers built in. And the thinner a film layer, the sharper the image could be. That was why Kodachrome held on. But as I said, Dye Transfer and Cibacrhome required darkroom skills significantly above average.

Link | Posted on Jan 27, 2017 at 15:46 UTC
On article Hopes of Kodachrome relaunch put on ice (172 comments in total)
In reply to:

barry reid: I didn't lament Kodachrome's demise and don't mind it's not coming back. I'm from the interim generation - I never used a darkroom, instead scanning my shots as soon as I got serious in the 90s. I continued with this approach and manual focus until could afford a secondhand FF DSLR in about 2006.

I shot a few rolls of the 'legendary' Kodachrome around the early 2000s and was far from impressed. While the slides look nice projected something about the structure made it very hard to match the results from scanning E6 films on My Nikon Coolscan III or V.

Most E6 and C-41 Rendered scans which printed every bit as well? and possibly better in the highlights, compared to the Eos 1Ds I moved to. Kodachrome, however, could not. Perhaps I missed a trick and maybe an Imacon would do better but that's my experience as a late 90s/early 2000s film shooter.

Oops, responded to the wrong person. :-)

Link | Posted on Jan 27, 2017 at 15:39 UTC
On article Hopes of Kodachrome relaunch put on ice (172 comments in total)

I loved Kodacrhome. I shot my semester-long photo essay class in journalism school with a box of Kodachrome 64 Pro. Some of the best photos I've ever taken.

But when I went digital, it became a one-way street. Film back then was ridiculously expensive. Think about it. 36 frames for $9 plus $5 or more for processing. How much would it be now? I shudder to think.

Plus, one slip in the processor and the best frame is ruined. My best slides of the Northern Lights reflected in Lake Hills of Peace, Alberta, were ruined in processing by Kodak.

Shooting images like a fire hose may not make you a better photographer, and might only occasionally get a better photo than slowing down, but that's only half the issue.

Not wasting film to shoot something, because film is so expensive and you want to save it for "something better," doesn't always pay off. It's a great exercise to shoot one photo a day for a month, and try to make each one a gem. But, more is better.

Link | Posted on Jan 27, 2017 at 15:36 UTC as 26th comment
In reply to:

Smack53: This is kind of a personal article as I took up photography as a hobby to ease the pain of cancer 7 years ago. There were many days that I just wanted to give up, but I would get out there and do a little more each time and go a little further to force myself to get to out the way places for a photo. My little Canon PowerShot A510 was the way I started out, but as I started to get more into the hobby, I wanted something a little better to work with, so my family blessed me with a Canon PowerShot G12. I learned an awful lot about manual controls on that camera, and it gave me more excitement about the days ahead, and brought back some hope that all would be alright. Ultimately, I survived and am in remarkable health due to a hobby that forced me to keep moving and stay focused on the brighter side of life than the hell I was going through. Many thanks to Lisa Bettany for allowing us to see her incredible journey as an inspiration to us all!

Thanks for that. As a member of a family hit by cancer, I understand how important it is to support loved ones like that. We are very fortunate.

Link | Posted on Jan 27, 2017 at 15:24 UTC
Total: 271, showing: 1 – 20
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