HowaboutRAW

Joined on Sep 1, 2011

Comments

Total: 18088, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

EvilTed: It took a trip to Vietnam in 2012 for me to move away from Leica.
I had an M3, M7, M 240 and M Monochrome.
I also had some of their best lenses.

I bought into the brand and enjoyed using it a lot BUT when I needed to shoot in really low light, I discovered that all Leica's SUCK :(
Even with a 50 and 35 Lux @ F1.4, the M was lucky if it could shoot above ISO 1600 without getting noisy.

On the street, Leica's require hyper-focal focusing in order to get a shot, but paying $4500 for a 28mm Cron, that is at it's best wide-open, seemed a waste of money if shot @ F8.

You have a slow, manual focus experience that is good for... things that are standing still in good light.
The 90 Cron is still one of my favorite rendering lenses, but it's a crippled system IMHO.
I moved to Sony with an A7s and was blown away by its low light ability.

As for Leica holding it's value second hand? That's simply a myth, unless you are selling mint vintage pieces.

EvilTed:

The Sony A7S shoots lossy raws. It's not an especially strong higher ISO body, albeit it's better than the Leica M10, though of course the Sony has many fewer mega pixels than the Leica M10.

The Sony A7S II, which doesn't shoot lossy only raws, is bested for higher ISO shooting by the Nikon Df, Nikon D850, the D5, the Canon 5DIV, Canon 1DX, the Sony A9, and yes the Leica SL (with the later firmware).

Or did you mean Sony A7s? The first version of the A7 is hugely problematic--only partly about lossy raws. And the A7II really isn't a better higher ISO body than the Leica M10.

Link | Posted on Nov 18, 2017 at 06:14 UTC
In reply to:

nzav: I gave up Leica M bodies because my ability to focus with the rangefinder had reached a point where my Nikon images were consistently sharper then the Leica shots. When they were properly focused, they were hard to tell which camera produced them.

Mechanical rangefinders are less accurate. The rangefinder relies on a cam on the back of the lens, and it works admirably for the most part. The fact is, all lenses have a focus shift at different apertures. In other words, if the lens is perfectly focused with the rangefinder and the aperture is changed, the focus point will shift.

This issue is present with all lenses whether rangefinder or DSLR. Some high-end (pro) camera bodies have the option to tweak the AF to compensate for some of this, but they also have the issue of using a separate focus plane from the actual sensor plane. A mirrorless camera (such as the X-Pro2) uses the actual image sensor to do the focusing and is therefore less vulnerable to focus shift issues.

K:

Panasonic seems to get more out of Sony sensors than Sony, I realize Panasonic is not alone in this. Right, the LX10 is excellent, and not all SonyZeiss lenses are real special, nor are all PanaLeica. (Imaging Resource posted raws shot with that new f/2.8 200mm PanaLeica on a GH5, they look excellent.)

No, even the best Canons are not strong for "tone" subtly, though the raws from the new L 85mm that DPR posted look promising. I was disappointed when I tried that new Canon 85 on a 5DSR.

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2017 at 23:28 UTC
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: Does Microsoft include the Photoshop CC license with the loaner unit?

And does MS allow Blair Bunting to remove all that MS spyware built into Windows 10?

bausfight:

Big difference between what Win 10 can do and basic "analytics".

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2017 at 22:09 UTC
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: Does Microsoft include the Photoshop CC license with the loaner unit?

And does MS allow Blair Bunting to remove all that MS spyware built into Windows 10?

Dr_Jon,

No, running real kill or remove software will kill any adverts.

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2017 at 22:08 UTC
In reply to:

nzav: I gave up Leica M bodies because my ability to focus with the rangefinder had reached a point where my Nikon images were consistently sharper then the Leica shots. When they were properly focused, they were hard to tell which camera produced them.

Mechanical rangefinders are less accurate. The rangefinder relies on a cam on the back of the lens, and it works admirably for the most part. The fact is, all lenses have a focus shift at different apertures. In other words, if the lens is perfectly focused with the rangefinder and the aperture is changed, the focus point will shift.

This issue is present with all lenses whether rangefinder or DSLR. Some high-end (pro) camera bodies have the option to tweak the AF to compensate for some of this, but they also have the issue of using a separate focus plane from the actual sensor plane. A mirrorless camera (such as the X-Pro2) uses the actual image sensor to do the focusing and is therefore less vulnerable to focus shift issues.

Copal Fit:

Optically best means not simply reading charts/scores, though the M 50mm f/2.0 APO scores incredibly well, but also using lenses.

The best, far from all, Leica Ms are still better optically than pretty much anything else for stills photography. But for example the Leica M 90mm f2.0 is just very good, and not inexpensive. So too the incredibly sharp Leica M 50mm f/1.4; it's just very good and expensive.

Right, a lens' optical quality has nothing to do with good/bad scene composition.

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2017 at 15:32 UTC
In reply to:

nzav: I gave up Leica M bodies because my ability to focus with the rangefinder had reached a point where my Nikon images were consistently sharper then the Leica shots. When they were properly focused, they were hard to tell which camera produced them.

Mechanical rangefinders are less accurate. The rangefinder relies on a cam on the back of the lens, and it works admirably for the most part. The fact is, all lenses have a focus shift at different apertures. In other words, if the lens is perfectly focused with the rangefinder and the aperture is changed, the focus point will shift.

This issue is present with all lenses whether rangefinder or DSLR. Some high-end (pro) camera bodies have the option to tweak the AF to compensate for some of this, but they also have the issue of using a separate focus plane from the actual sensor plane. A mirrorless camera (such as the X-Pro2) uses the actual image sensor to do the focusing and is therefore less vulnerable to focus shift issues.

nzav:

Okay, however the best Leica M lenses are still significantly better than anything from Fuji or Nikon. (With a tiny caveat about a single Fuji GF lens, a single ironically inexpensive X lens, and the Nikon 200mm f2.0 .)

Now, no, those best Ms are not cheap. Basically they start at 7000usd.

You're correct Nikon has made vast improvements in the optical quality of its lenses, and good Fujis were always very good optically.

"With the current pro-level optics, it is difficult to find image superiority between different makers' best lenses."

It's pretty easy to see why the aforementioned Leica Ms are a better, but of course you need to use them on a Leica M or SL. The 50mm SL Leica is also stunning.

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2017 at 15:03 UTC
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: Does Microsoft include the Photoshop CC license with the loaner unit?

And does MS allow Blair Bunting to remove all that MS spyware built into Windows 10?

JordanAT:

You really need to websearch "Windows 10 spyware" before you continue to post such foolish justifications for MS's abuses. Win 10 takes big brother to a new level.

(Now no, unlike say Facebook, there's no evidence that MS is actually doing much collection, yet at least. But MS can collect far more data on everything on your Windows 10 computer, including file contents, than MS can collect on a Win7/8 user's system.)

Also to avoid normal "telemetry", which on my Win 7 laptop is really limited to my Opera web browser, and a check for, not download of, AV definitions, my computer is not continuously connected to the internet.

True Adguard, the browser extension auto updates, and so does Ghostery, well the Chromium version does.

No, I don't run Photoshop CC. It's rental only.

Oh, and just killing auto, that's forced, Windows 10 updates seems like reason enough to kill the Win 10 spyware that comes as a turned on built in "feature" of the OS.

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2017 at 13:54 UTC
In reply to:

nzav: I gave up Leica M bodies because my ability to focus with the rangefinder had reached a point where my Nikon images were consistently sharper then the Leica shots. When they were properly focused, they were hard to tell which camera produced them.

Mechanical rangefinders are less accurate. The rangefinder relies on a cam on the back of the lens, and it works admirably for the most part. The fact is, all lenses have a focus shift at different apertures. In other words, if the lens is perfectly focused with the rangefinder and the aperture is changed, the focus point will shift.

This issue is present with all lenses whether rangefinder or DSLR. Some high-end (pro) camera bodies have the option to tweak the AF to compensate for some of this, but they also have the issue of using a separate focus plane from the actual sensor plane. A mirrorless camera (such as the X-Pro2) uses the actual image sensor to do the focusing and is therefore less vulnerable to focus shift issues.

FujiLover:

Sigma isn't really there yet, though it has made great strides with the ART series. And the SigmaART 135 f/1.8 is close to the better, not best, Leica lenses, which include some of the SL lenses.

True that Zeiss makes full framed manual focus SLR lenses that are amazing, and the Loxia lenses are optically excellent. That Batis 85mm is excellent (likely the same as the Tamron 85mm inside). However the Leica Ms you list above, when used on an SL or M, are still better.

Then of course there are all the Leica S lenses.

That Fuji 63mm f/2.0 GF lens is pretty close to Leica, not the other GF lenses though.

There's the discontinued Samsung 50-150mm and the 85mm. Those are in good Leica territory. So too the very highend Olympus--only 12 bit files of course. That Sony FE GM 24-70 is excellent. So is the Nikon version, and the new Nikon 70-200. Not quite at the better Leica level, there's the Nikon 105 f/1.4. Now the Nikon 200mm f/2.0 is amazing, but heavy and not cheap.

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2017 at 13:08 UTC
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: Does Microsoft include the Photoshop CC license with the loaner unit?

And does MS allow Blair Bunting to remove all that MS spyware built into Windows 10?

TMax1980:

True, but Adobe CC isn't constantly checking with the cental Adobe servers.

Photoshop CC isn't really cloud based software. It's a misnomer. So unlike GoogleDocs.

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2017 at 12:34 UTC
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: And does Microsoft, or Hasselblad, just pay for a Photoshop CC subscription for a lent out MS Surface Book 2?

In other words, all systems require set up, and installation of software particular to ones needs. Much of this software, Photoshop CS, AutoCAD, Solidworks, Adobe Premier Pro, requires paid licenses. And of course the 2 Adobe products are rental only.

Assuming Blair Bunting already uses Photoshop CC, so has that rental license, does Adobe just allow Bunting to run 30 day trialware on a different machine, if Bunting's current computers already have it up and running?

Did Microsoft allow Bunting to uninstall all of that Win10 spyware on the loaner unit? Removing this MS crapware not only stops MS telemetry, it stops Win10 from doing updates, and restarts, when you don't want such things to occur.

RM:

It's not "can't", it's that you didn't bother. Not sarcasm.

You weren't interested to learn more about the Win 10 spyware. Not really a surprise

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2017 at 12:18 UTC
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: And does Microsoft, or Hasselblad, just pay for a Photoshop CC subscription for a lent out MS Surface Book 2?

In other words, all systems require set up, and installation of software particular to ones needs. Much of this software, Photoshop CS, AutoCAD, Solidworks, Adobe Premier Pro, requires paid licenses. And of course the 2 Adobe products are rental only.

Assuming Blair Bunting already uses Photoshop CC, so has that rental license, does Adobe just allow Bunting to run 30 day trialware on a different machine, if Bunting's current computers already have it up and running?

Did Microsoft allow Bunting to uninstall all of that Win10 spyware on the loaner unit? Removing this MS crapware not only stops MS telemetry, it stops Win10 from doing updates, and restarts, when you don't want such things to occur.

KrisAK:

Just search the terms "Windows 10 spyware" for an explanation. It's what MS calls "telemetry"; it also screws with WiFi speed.

MajorGeeks has software (free) that can remove it, or kill it. Yes, one can selectively kill parts of it--leaving say Windows Defender running.

Obviously set a System Restore point before killing the Win10 spyware. (Better yet get the freeware version of RollbackRX, it's much much better than System Restore, but does take up drive space on your C drive.)

Once you've killed/removed the Win10 spyware, auto updates will have been killed in the process. Therefore make sure to check for WinUpdates a few times a week, especially after 10:45AM Seattle time on the second Tuesday of the month.

Win10 will automatically download all recommend updates as soon as you run the check, there's no picking and choosing without adding another piece of software. On Patch Tuesday you'll always have to restart the machine. But you can choose when to get these updates.

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2017 at 03:51 UTC
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: And does Microsoft, or Hasselblad, just pay for a Photoshop CC subscription for a lent out MS Surface Book 2?

In other words, all systems require set up, and installation of software particular to ones needs. Much of this software, Photoshop CS, AutoCAD, Solidworks, Adobe Premier Pro, requires paid licenses. And of course the 2 Adobe products are rental only.

Assuming Blair Bunting already uses Photoshop CC, so has that rental license, does Adobe just allow Bunting to run 30 day trialware on a different machine, if Bunting's current computers already have it up and running?

Did Microsoft allow Bunting to uninstall all of that Win10 spyware on the loaner unit? Removing this MS crapware not only stops MS telemetry, it stops Win10 from doing updates, and restarts, when you don't want such things to occur.

Richard M:

Windows 10's spyware is real well documented. That you can't use an internet search engine is not my failing.

You also missed word "auto" preceding "updates".

Frankly your ignorance is there for all to see. All you had to do was search the point.

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2017 at 03:41 UTC
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: And does Microsoft, or Hasselblad, just pay for a Photoshop CC subscription for a lent out MS Surface Book 2?

In other words, all systems require set up, and installation of software particular to ones needs. Much of this software, Photoshop CS, AutoCAD, Solidworks, Adobe Premier Pro, requires paid licenses. And of course the 2 Adobe products are rental only.

Assuming Blair Bunting already uses Photoshop CC, so has that rental license, does Adobe just allow Bunting to run 30 day trialware on a different machine, if Bunting's current computers already have it up and running?

Did Microsoft allow Bunting to uninstall all of that Win10 spyware on the loaner unit? Removing this MS crapware not only stops MS telemetry, it stops Win10 from doing updates, and restarts, when you don't want such things to occur.

RM:

So you have no idea of what you're saying regards Windows 10 and spyware.

Removal of the MS spyware, and forced updates, DOES NOT preclude anyone with admin access from running WinUpdate. However now, you get to chose when WinUpdate runs. Such a setup for, any half-aware computer user, is a massive improvement in functionality.

(There's even still a way of picking which individual Win10 updates get installed, so you can go one at a time--but this is more complex than simply running WinUpdate.)

Yeah, there's some irony here, and it has nothing to do with increasing the chances of spyware being surreptitiously installed on your Win10 system.

Thanks for posting your knowledge regards Windows 10 and Microsoft's spyware, AKA telemetry. /s

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2017 at 01:44 UTC
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: And does Microsoft, or Hasselblad, just pay for a Photoshop CC subscription for a lent out MS Surface Book 2?

In other words, all systems require set up, and installation of software particular to ones needs. Much of this software, Photoshop CS, AutoCAD, Solidworks, Adobe Premier Pro, requires paid licenses. And of course the 2 Adobe products are rental only.

Assuming Blair Bunting already uses Photoshop CC, so has that rental license, does Adobe just allow Bunting to run 30 day trialware on a different machine, if Bunting's current computers already have it up and running?

Did Microsoft allow Bunting to uninstall all of that Win10 spyware on the loaner unit? Removing this MS crapware not only stops MS telemetry, it stops Win10 from doing updates, and restarts, when you don't want such things to occur.

HenryEckstein:

I have no idea what point(s) of mine you're responding to.

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2017 at 01:03 UTC

What's the bit depth of the screen on this Surface?

Don't the new MacBook Pros have 9 bit screens (jittered to "10 bits")?

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2017 at 00:36 UTC as 41st comment
In reply to:

dr8: I am skeptical. I have read too many (overwhelming) comments on sites like askwoody, bleeping computer, ars technica that are polar opposite of this "ad". Oh yes, and that website that posts tear-down & rebuild on new tech - they gave it the lowest possible score on being able to service or repair. Those are other things I've read.

The new MacBook Pros are next to impossible to repair too.

Now, right there are pro laptops from HP that are much more repairable, run the non-creapy Windows 7, have an option for 10 bit IPS screens, have normal ports and an SD card slot. Of course they start at about $3500. And no, the battery won't run the laptop all day.

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2017 at 00:20 UTC
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: And does Microsoft, or Hasselblad, just pay for a Photoshop CC subscription for a lent out MS Surface Book 2?

In other words, all systems require set up, and installation of software particular to ones needs. Much of this software, Photoshop CS, AutoCAD, Solidworks, Adobe Premier Pro, requires paid licenses. And of course the 2 Adobe products are rental only.

Assuming Blair Bunting already uses Photoshop CC, so has that rental license, does Adobe just allow Bunting to run 30 day trialware on a different machine, if Bunting's current computers already have it up and running?

Did Microsoft allow Bunting to uninstall all of that Win10 spyware on the loaner unit? Removing this MS crapware not only stops MS telemetry, it stops Win10 from doing updates, and restarts, when you don't want such things to occur.

PhotoKhan:

"Again, as long as you log-in for use and log-out when finished you can run PS CC on any computer in the world with your license."

This is news to me.

"and its usefulness got lost amidst all the irrational ranting about PS and LR going into "subscription mode only"."

It's irrational to object to software that dies if you don't pay up? And you so blithely used "erroneous" above.

"When people shout, they can't hear the real relevant sounds."

The information you shared about being able to use it on any computer as long as you log out on the others contradicts the claims of being able to use it on 2 computers by other parties above.

Also why have to go to the trouble of logging out? It's a pain.

If what you say is true, it's interesting to learn that CC offers that feature.
But my question remains real relevant. No serious computer user, just takes the machine out of the box and starts using it for pro work. Not even with a Mac.

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2017 at 00:13 UTC
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: And does Microsoft, or Hasselblad, just pay for a Photoshop CC subscription for a lent out MS Surface Book 2?

In other words, all systems require set up, and installation of software particular to ones needs. Much of this software, Photoshop CS, AutoCAD, Solidworks, Adobe Premier Pro, requires paid licenses. And of course the 2 Adobe products are rental only.

Assuming Blair Bunting already uses Photoshop CC, so has that rental license, does Adobe just allow Bunting to run 30 day trialware on a different machine, if Bunting's current computers already have it up and running?

Did Microsoft allow Bunting to uninstall all of that Win10 spyware on the loaner unit? Removing this MS crapware not only stops MS telemetry, it stops Win10 from doing updates, and restarts, when you don't want such things to occur.

PhotoKahn:

"You can only run your license - by logging in - on 2 computers at a time."

This is news to me, but I don't run CC.

Also wouldn't Bunting have a laptop license and the additional office/studio license for the desktop in the studio? So the 2 per rental license would be covered. No one wants to do serious editing of files from the 100MP Hasselblad on a laptop.

Link | Posted on Nov 16, 2017 at 23:46 UTC
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: And does Microsoft, or Hasselblad, just pay for a Photoshop CC subscription for a lent out MS Surface Book 2?

In other words, all systems require set up, and installation of software particular to ones needs. Much of this software, Photoshop CS, AutoCAD, Solidworks, Adobe Premier Pro, requires paid licenses. And of course the 2 Adobe products are rental only.

Assuming Blair Bunting already uses Photoshop CC, so has that rental license, does Adobe just allow Bunting to run 30 day trialware on a different machine, if Bunting's current computers already have it up and running?

Did Microsoft allow Bunting to uninstall all of that Win10 spyware on the loaner unit? Removing this MS crapware not only stops MS telemetry, it stops Win10 from doing updates, and restarts, when you don't want such things to occur.

tint+Ker:

It just seems like information that should be spelled out in this blog.

And not so much to avoid the spying, but to avoid the auto OS updates + restarts, it's very important to be able to remove the Microsoft Win 10 spyware, which anyone can do if he/she has administrative access to Windows 10.

Of course once Photoshop CC is up and running and fully updated, it's important to kill all of the extra Adobe startup software via MSCONFiG. And there's always other garbage worth suppressing at startup on a Windows machine.

Link | Posted on Nov 16, 2017 at 23:30 UTC

Does Microsoft include the Photoshop CC license with the loaner unit?

And does MS allow Blair Bunting to remove all that MS spyware built into Windows 10?

Link | Posted on Nov 16, 2017 at 23:11 UTC as 44th comment | 9 replies
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