HowaboutRAW

Joined on Sep 1, 2011

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Total: 16620, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

T3: It's funny, because a lot of the vitriol and disdain being directed at Sony today (by fans of other brands) reminds me of the vitriol and disdain that was directed at Canon in the late 1980's when Canon switched from FD to EOS, and when Canon had aims of catching Nikon. Canon FD users were angry as heck, and Nikon/Minolta/Pentax/Olympus users piled on, too. But Canon persevered, stuck to their guns, kept cranking out interesting products, and eventually they rose to where they are today. It did not happen overnight. They had to overcome a lot of anger, antipathy, distrust. They had to overcome the skepticism of the new technology they were bringing to the market. But they kept going, kept fighting. They were the hungry, ambitious "underdog", but they had some really good technology to support them (much of which was lambasted as gimmicky, untested, untrustworthy, problematic, etc, at the time-- typical FUD). It's a lot like what Sony is going through now.

Everything:

"It is a certainty that removing the tripod head to replace the battery is entirely avoidable in ANY CASE where it needs to be avoided."

No, it's not, absent the addition of an extra grip.

"frame rate of the mechanical shutter is now the excuse your using to say it is a "prosumer body"?"

Mechanical shutter frame rate is one of the reasons. The battery, which you ignore and pretend isn't a problem, is another. There are other things that remain to be tested--like weather sealing. The buttons are too closely spaced.

"All of the R&D in this camera is specifically to make the mechanical shutter irrelevant for high frame rate shooting. "

Well it didn't work out that way. Such things may come to pass in the future.

"I think it might be you that is confused about more than just digital camera gear."

How so? I understand that what tripod head looks like, and that 15 seconds can be a big deal in a major sporting event.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 22:22 UTC
In reply to:

T3: It's funny, because a lot of the vitriol and disdain being directed at Sony today (by fans of other brands) reminds me of the vitriol and disdain that was directed at Canon in the late 1980's when Canon switched from FD to EOS, and when Canon had aims of catching Nikon. Canon FD users were angry as heck, and Nikon/Minolta/Pentax/Olympus users piled on, too. But Canon persevered, stuck to their guns, kept cranking out interesting products, and eventually they rose to where they are today. It did not happen overnight. They had to overcome a lot of anger, antipathy, distrust. They had to overcome the skepticism of the new technology they were bringing to the market. But they kept going, kept fighting. They were the hungry, ambitious "underdog", but they had some really good technology to support them (much of which was lambasted as gimmicky, untested, untrustworthy, problematic, etc, at the time-- typical FUD). It's a lot like what Sony is going through now.

Everything:

It's a certainty that one will have to remove the tripod head from the A9 to replace the battery in most cases.

Therefore no FUD involved.

It's not a pro sports body because of the mechanical shutter frame rate; that's an additional reason it's a prosumer body. (And make no mistake Sony has marketed it as a pro sports body.)

You seem confused about digital camera gear. The Pentax K1 isn't pro body either. (Nothing to stop pros from using it, but not for sports.)

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 22:04 UTC
In reply to:

T3: It's funny, because a lot of the vitriol and disdain being directed at Sony today (by fans of other brands) reminds me of the vitriol and disdain that was directed at Canon in the late 1980's when Canon switched from FD to EOS, and when Canon had aims of catching Nikon. Canon FD users were angry as heck, and Nikon/Minolta/Pentax/Olympus users piled on, too. But Canon persevered, stuck to their guns, kept cranking out interesting products, and eventually they rose to where they are today. It did not happen overnight. They had to overcome a lot of anger, antipathy, distrust. They had to overcome the skepticism of the new technology they were bringing to the market. But they kept going, kept fighting. They were the hungry, ambitious "underdog", but they had some really good technology to support them (much of which was lambasted as gimmicky, untested, untrustworthy, problematic, etc, at the time-- typical FUD). It's a lot like what Sony is going through now.

Everythingis1:

This A9 is being marketed by Sony as a a pro body, it's not.

There's no FUD in pointing out the fact of how the battery has to be removed from the A9.

Sony made its choices, they were flawed. Now, look, for many purposes this is an excellent camera. And if it were being retailed at say $2500 for the body, it would likely be very popular. (Assuming there are no massive undiscovered flaws in it.)

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 21:34 UTC
In reply to:

T3: It's funny, because a lot of the vitriol and disdain being directed at Sony today (by fans of other brands) reminds me of the vitriol and disdain that was directed at Canon in the late 1980's when Canon switched from FD to EOS, and when Canon had aims of catching Nikon. Canon FD users were angry as heck, and Nikon/Minolta/Pentax/Olympus users piled on, too. But Canon persevered, stuck to their guns, kept cranking out interesting products, and eventually they rose to where they are today. It did not happen overnight. They had to overcome a lot of anger, antipathy, distrust. They had to overcome the skepticism of the new technology they were bringing to the market. But they kept going, kept fighting. They were the hungry, ambitious "underdog", but they had some really good technology to support them (much of which was lambasted as gimmicky, untested, untrustworthy, problematic, etc, at the time-- typical FUD). It's a lot like what Sony is going through now.

Everythingis1:

"Ignoring the fact that your complaint about the battery door is a non issue because of the battery grip huh?"

Still confused by the difference between a camera to which a battery containing grip can be added, like a K1, and a pro sports body, like the D5.

There's much to commend about the A9; it still aint a pro body that competes with the D5 and 1DXII.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 21:22 UTC
In reply to:

T3: It's funny, because a lot of the vitriol and disdain being directed at Sony today (by fans of other brands) reminds me of the vitriol and disdain that was directed at Canon in the late 1980's when Canon switched from FD to EOS, and when Canon had aims of catching Nikon. Canon FD users were angry as heck, and Nikon/Minolta/Pentax/Olympus users piled on, too. But Canon persevered, stuck to their guns, kept cranking out interesting products, and eventually they rose to where they are today. It did not happen overnight. They had to overcome a lot of anger, antipathy, distrust. They had to overcome the skepticism of the new technology they were bringing to the market. But they kept going, kept fighting. They were the hungry, ambitious "underdog", but they had some really good technology to support them (much of which was lambasted as gimmicky, untested, untrustworthy, problematic, etc, at the time-- typical FUD). It's a lot like what Sony is going through now.

PAntunes:

"Sorry, the requested page does not exist.
Please check the URL for correct spelling and capitalization."

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 20:06 UTC
In reply to:

T3: It's funny, because a lot of the vitriol and disdain being directed at Sony today (by fans of other brands) reminds me of the vitriol and disdain that was directed at Canon in the late 1980's when Canon switched from FD to EOS, and when Canon had aims of catching Nikon. Canon FD users were angry as heck, and Nikon/Minolta/Pentax/Olympus users piled on, too. But Canon persevered, stuck to their guns, kept cranking out interesting products, and eventually they rose to where they are today. It did not happen overnight. They had to overcome a lot of anger, antipathy, distrust. They had to overcome the skepticism of the new technology they were bringing to the market. But they kept going, kept fighting. They were the hungry, ambitious "underdog", but they had some really good technology to support them (much of which was lambasted as gimmicky, untested, untrustworthy, problematic, etc, at the time-- typical FUD). It's a lot like what Sony is going through now.

PAntunes:

"sorry, I've got a camera with a grip that slides to the side, just like the 1Dx, and it hits the tripod if the center column is not up...." depends on a lot of things there. It's the battery on the 1DXII that slides, not the grip.

Don't see how, if the Canon 1DXII is mounted horizontally, you'll run the battery into the tripod legs or head (and you did say legs) if you slide the battery out horizontally.

(Right, mounted vertically, there are those L brackets that could interfere.)

Now if you were using the tripod in a situation where the legs were above the head, I can see how if you can't readily spin the head the battery could run into a leg--provided the center post is not extending. But this is real outlier.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 19:54 UTC
In reply to:

Maaggix: Sony is a leader of overheating camera manufacturing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xxGl9Tl6Sao

Maagix:

With this kind of thing, it's best to wait to see if others can readily recreate the problem.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 19:03 UTC
In reply to:

T3: It's funny, because a lot of the vitriol and disdain being directed at Sony today (by fans of other brands) reminds me of the vitriol and disdain that was directed at Canon in the late 1980's when Canon switched from FD to EOS, and when Canon had aims of catching Nikon. Canon FD users were angry as heck, and Nikon/Minolta/Pentax/Olympus users piled on, too. But Canon persevered, stuck to their guns, kept cranking out interesting products, and eventually they rose to where they are today. It did not happen overnight. They had to overcome a lot of anger, antipathy, distrust. They had to overcome the skepticism of the new technology they were bringing to the market. But they kept going, kept fighting. They were the hungry, ambitious "underdog", but they had some really good technology to support them (much of which was lambasted as gimmicky, untested, untrustworthy, problematic, etc, at the time-- typical FUD). It's a lot like what Sony is going through now.

Everythinkis1:

I'm talking about exactly what I wrote.

I didn't say a word about the A9's additional battery grip--for obvious reasons. The Pentax K1 has one too. So too the Leica S.

The remains not a pro sports body.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 19:00 UTC
In reply to:

T3: It's funny, because a lot of the vitriol and disdain being directed at Sony today (by fans of other brands) reminds me of the vitriol and disdain that was directed at Canon in the late 1980's when Canon switched from FD to EOS, and when Canon had aims of catching Nikon. Canon FD users were angry as heck, and Nikon/Minolta/Pentax/Olympus users piled on, too. But Canon persevered, stuck to their guns, kept cranking out interesting products, and eventually they rose to where they are today. It did not happen overnight. They had to overcome a lot of anger, antipathy, distrust. They had to overcome the skepticism of the new technology they were bringing to the market. But they kept going, kept fighting. They were the hungry, ambitious "underdog", but they had some really good technology to support them (much of which was lambasted as gimmicky, untested, untrustworthy, problematic, etc, at the time-- typical FUD). It's a lot like what Sony is going through now.

PAntunes:

That's hardly a rule for magazines and newspapers.

"even if you're not using a L bracket, you still have the tripod legs", no, not really, the legs of a tripod will in noway interfere with removal of the 1DXII's battery.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 18:55 UTC
In reply to:

T3: It's funny, because a lot of the vitriol and disdain being directed at Sony today (by fans of other brands) reminds me of the vitriol and disdain that was directed at Canon in the late 1980's when Canon switched from FD to EOS, and when Canon had aims of catching Nikon. Canon FD users were angry as heck, and Nikon/Minolta/Pentax/Olympus users piled on, too. But Canon persevered, stuck to their guns, kept cranking out interesting products, and eventually they rose to where they are today. It did not happen overnight. They had to overcome a lot of anger, antipathy, distrust. They had to overcome the skepticism of the new technology they were bringing to the market. But they kept going, kept fighting. They were the hungry, ambitious "underdog", but they had some really good technology to support them (much of which was lambasted as gimmicky, untested, untrustworthy, problematic, etc, at the time-- typical FUD). It's a lot like what Sony is going through now.

Everythingis1:

You're demonstrating your lack of familiarity with pro photo/video gear and generally rechargeable batteries.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 15:06 UTC
In reply to:

princecody: Is the a9 faster & more accurate than the Nikon D500 & Olympus E-M1 Mark II?

princecody:

There's AF, there's buffer clearing.

There's E shutter versus Mechanical shutter.

In E shutter the A9 is much faster than the EM1II and D500.

However in mechanical shutter the D500 is much faster, so even is the Leica SL, though the Leica doesn't have the buffer of the Nikon.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 13:56 UTC
In reply to:

T3: It's funny, because a lot of the vitriol and disdain being directed at Sony today (by fans of other brands) reminds me of the vitriol and disdain that was directed at Canon in the late 1980's when Canon switched from FD to EOS, and when Canon had aims of catching Nikon. Canon FD users were angry as heck, and Nikon/Minolta/Pentax/Olympus users piled on, too. But Canon persevered, stuck to their guns, kept cranking out interesting products, and eventually they rose to where they are today. It did not happen overnight. They had to overcome a lot of anger, antipathy, distrust. They had to overcome the skepticism of the new technology they were bringing to the market. But they kept going, kept fighting. They were the hungry, ambitious "underdog", but they had some really good technology to support them (much of which was lambasted as gimmicky, untested, untrustworthy, problematic, etc, at the time-- typical FUD). It's a lot like what Sony is going through now.

PAntunes:

You're adding conditions, and yes, right, those conditions can block things.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 13:50 UTC
In reply to:

T3: It's funny, because a lot of the vitriol and disdain being directed at Sony today (by fans of other brands) reminds me of the vitriol and disdain that was directed at Canon in the late 1980's when Canon switched from FD to EOS, and when Canon had aims of catching Nikon. Canon FD users were angry as heck, and Nikon/Minolta/Pentax/Olympus users piled on, too. But Canon persevered, stuck to their guns, kept cranking out interesting products, and eventually they rose to where they are today. It did not happen overnight. They had to overcome a lot of anger, antipathy, distrust. They had to overcome the skepticism of the new technology they were bringing to the market. But they kept going, kept fighting. They were the hungry, ambitious "underdog", but they had some really good technology to support them (much of which was lambasted as gimmicky, untested, untrustworthy, problematic, etc, at the time-- typical FUD). It's a lot like what Sony is going through now.

PAntunes:

Regards the Canon 1DX II's battery, with the camera facing forward, looking at the rear screen, the battery slides out of the left side bottom. Meaning the whole thing can stay mounted to pretty much any tripod head, and the battery can still be swapped.

Right, there are smallish tripod heads that would all one to open the battery door on the A7, while it's still mounted to the tripod head.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 13:01 UTC
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: There's much to like about the A99II and the A9.

But the A99II still needs better lenses, more of them.

And given that the A9 is supposed to compete with the likes of the Nikon D5 and Canon 1DS Mark II, the A9 body is too small.

A bigger body would allow for better heat dispersion, so the A9 could actually be shot at ISO 50k.

(As it is, the A9 stops being useful at about ISO 30K, mechanical shutter--raw, which is about Nikon Df territory, or Leica SL. It's big colour blotches that are the issue, not conventional noise/grain.)

It's an error on the part of Sony that the A9 can't remain mounted to a tripod head and still allow the battery to be swapped. The D5, 1DX II and the Fuji GFX-50S don't have this basic flaw.

The A9's mechanical shutter frame rate is too low for a "pro" body.

RubberDials:

"You don't take pictures and you don't have a camera? After all that?"

Not at all what I said.

Also obviously, since I have hundreds of raws that I've shot with the A9, I take pictures.

Note the noun event, and the camera I'd mentioned.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 12:43 UTC
In reply to:

T3: It's funny, because a lot of the vitriol and disdain being directed at Sony today (by fans of other brands) reminds me of the vitriol and disdain that was directed at Canon in the late 1980's when Canon switched from FD to EOS, and when Canon had aims of catching Nikon. Canon FD users were angry as heck, and Nikon/Minolta/Pentax/Olympus users piled on, too. But Canon persevered, stuck to their guns, kept cranking out interesting products, and eventually they rose to where they are today. It did not happen overnight. They had to overcome a lot of anger, antipathy, distrust. They had to overcome the skepticism of the new technology they were bringing to the market. But they kept going, kept fighting. They were the hungry, ambitious "underdog", but they had some really good technology to support them (much of which was lambasted as gimmicky, untested, untrustworthy, problematic, etc, at the time-- typical FUD). It's a lot like what Sony is going through now.

Everythingis1:

Yes, I've handled the A9; it's too small.

"How important is that really when you can take 4000+ pictures on one battery."

It's real easy to shoot 500 pictures with the ES set to high speed.

You don't seem real familiar with pro gear.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 12:26 UTC
In reply to:

T3: It's funny, because a lot of the vitriol and disdain being directed at Sony today (by fans of other brands) reminds me of the vitriol and disdain that was directed at Canon in the late 1980's when Canon switched from FD to EOS, and when Canon had aims of catching Nikon. Canon FD users were angry as heck, and Nikon/Minolta/Pentax/Olympus users piled on, too. But Canon persevered, stuck to their guns, kept cranking out interesting products, and eventually they rose to where they are today. It did not happen overnight. They had to overcome a lot of anger, antipathy, distrust. They had to overcome the skepticism of the new technology they were bringing to the market. But they kept going, kept fighting. They were the hungry, ambitious "underdog", but they had some really good technology to support them (much of which was lambasted as gimmicky, untested, untrustworthy, problematic, etc, at the time-- typical FUD). It's a lot like what Sony is going through now.

T3:

The "too small, too boxy" issue isn't new to the A7 bodies.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 00:45 UTC
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: There's much to like about the A99II and the A9.

But the A99II still needs better lenses, more of them.

And given that the A9 is supposed to compete with the likes of the Nikon D5 and Canon 1DS Mark II, the A9 body is too small.

A bigger body would allow for better heat dispersion, so the A9 could actually be shot at ISO 50k.

(As it is, the A9 stops being useful at about ISO 30K, mechanical shutter--raw, which is about Nikon Df territory, or Leica SL. It's big colour blotches that are the issue, not conventional noise/grain.)

It's an error on the part of Sony that the A9 can't remain mounted to a tripod head and still allow the battery to be swapped. The D5, 1DX II and the Fuji GFX-50S don't have this basic flaw.

The A9's mechanical shutter frame rate is too low for a "pro" body.

RubberDials:

I stopped shooting, since the event that was most attractive to my interests required renting bodies like a D4. (Now things have changed, and there are many strong higher ISO bodies available.)

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 00:43 UTC

"Street-Walker", not a good term to use. At least, if you want to market the bags in the USA.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 00:37 UTC as 3rd comment
On article Sony a9: more speed, less dynamic range (643 comments in total)
In reply to:

robspeed750: It will be interesting to see a comparison with the D500...

Gon0S:

Right, there are certainly bodies that you can leave a tripod head attached to the body, via the plate, and still swap a battery out of a bottom door.

However on the D5, 1DX, and Fuji GFX-50S, one just pulls the battery out of the side without ever having to even look at the bottom of the camera.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 00:30 UTC
In reply to:

T3: It's funny, because a lot of the vitriol and disdain being directed at Sony today (by fans of other brands) reminds me of the vitriol and disdain that was directed at Canon in the late 1980's when Canon switched from FD to EOS, and when Canon had aims of catching Nikon. Canon FD users were angry as heck, and Nikon/Minolta/Pentax/Olympus users piled on, too. But Canon persevered, stuck to their guns, kept cranking out interesting products, and eventually they rose to where they are today. It did not happen overnight. They had to overcome a lot of anger, antipathy, distrust. They had to overcome the skepticism of the new technology they were bringing to the market. But they kept going, kept fighting. They were the hungry, ambitious "underdog", but they had some really good technology to support them (much of which was lambasted as gimmicky, untested, untrustworthy, problematic, etc, at the time-- typical FUD). It's a lot like what Sony is going through now.

T3:

I think Sony with the A9 body is still too committed to small size.

It doesn't have to be huge, like D5, but something like a Pentax K1 in size. Also the battery needs to be swappable without removing the A9 from a tripod. That's remove in any sense, including leaving a small base plate attached to the body.

Frankly, the card door on the A9 looks flimsy, for a pro body. There's a reason the D5 puts the card door in the back.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 00:25 UTC
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