HowaboutRAW

Joined on Sep 1, 2011

Comments

Total: 17887, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

trac63: The big problem with Samsung's camera division was their pricing strategy. There was wide regional disparity in prices, and huge mark-ups on new models. The NX30 was priced well above the Nikon D5300, while the NX1 was double the street price of a Nikon D7100, and that was a huge problem. Almost all of their cameras were available at clearance price within a year of their introduction.

FLruckas:

Stalk, stalk, stalk,

Insult. And ageism directed at photos this time.

Still having problems with your Acer/Asus screen I see, or is it your colour vision.

You just don't know how to stop digging yourself into a hole further.

Link | Posted on Oct 22, 2017 at 14:28 UTC
In reply to:

Hinder: Three whole years?!!!! I have underwear older than that.

So? You can still likely purchase the same model/brand of underwear new.

Link | Posted on Oct 22, 2017 at 14:03 UTC
In reply to:

xoio: Hardly a throwback? - Slow Sunday more like.

The article posted on Thursday.

Can't buy a new NX1 any longer.

Link | Posted on Oct 22, 2017 at 13:59 UTC
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: F:

Still being stalky I see.

And not real familiar with the NX30 either.

FLrucky:

Stalk, stalk, stalk.

You can address the bolts fails to the DPR webmaster.

Link | Posted on Oct 22, 2017 at 13:45 UTC

F:

Still being stalky I see.

And not real familiar with the NX30 either.

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2017 at 23:13 UTC as 7th comment

F:

Still being stalky I see.

And not real familiar with the NX30 either.

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2017 at 22:59 UTC as 8th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

DominicVII: Samsung made the best mirrorless cameras. Back in those days l was all set on pulling the trigger on the NX30, only to be told by a representative of my local camera store that Samsung would soon be disbanding their camera division. Those who wish to understand the nature of Korean corporatism and why Samsung might have abandoned the camera business will find clues in Bruce Cumings's study 'Korea's Place in the Sun'. Samsung and LG were always instruments of the Korean state and their primary aim is to intensify the flow of foreign exchange into Korea, i.e., only export-intensive products are to be manufactured; business projects that fail in this regard are put to death by the Korean state itself.

F:

Still being stalky I see.

And not real familiar with the NX30 either.

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2017 at 22:50 UTC
In reply to:

JordanAT: "designed to pass MIL-STD 810G"

Despite the old, weak GPU and unknown CPU options and horribly lackluster battery, being able to drop this tablet from 6' onto a concrete slab onto every corner, edge, and flat surface without damage is quite an achievement. Unless whatever Note 14 is (since the link to the actual specs is dead) something like "vibration PSD when mounted to a sound surface only; not for drop testing".

Edit: Oh, and that huge bezel real estate...but let's not bother to put the speakers there, that would make for decent sound.

dylan:

Wait until the HP website allows one to order/customize these machines.

You can look at the other so called "mobile workstations" for an idea of what the full range of GPU options will be.

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2017 at 22:06 UTC
In reply to:

JordanAT: "designed to pass MIL-STD 810G"

Despite the old, weak GPU and unknown CPU options and horribly lackluster battery, being able to drop this tablet from 6' onto a concrete slab onto every corner, edge, and flat surface without damage is quite an achievement. Unless whatever Note 14 is (since the link to the actual specs is dead) something like "vibration PSD when mounted to a sound surface only; not for drop testing".

Edit: Oh, and that huge bezel real estate...but let's not bother to put the speakers there, that would make for decent sound.

dylanear:

"The graphics are older, lackluster compared to the best out there, but also, not a bad choice for imaging professionals, way better than integrated graphics. But it's no gaming machine."

I read the above as saying "this is set up to compete with gaming machines but it really doesn't; it's okay for other purposes".

Except that pro photo/rendering has requirements that gaming machines really can't meet.

So by bringing up gaming you made the unnecessary linkage.

HP has gaming computers, the Omen line. The desktops are even beginning to come with motherboards that have slots for Optane chips.

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2017 at 21:02 UTC
In reply to:

trac63: The big problem with Samsung's camera division was their pricing strategy. There was wide regional disparity in prices, and huge mark-ups on new models. The NX30 was priced well above the Nikon D5300, while the NX1 was double the street price of a Nikon D7100, and that was a huge problem. Almost all of their cameras were available at clearance price within a year of their introduction.

FLruckas:

Well if it isn't Mr/Ms stalky.

And yeah, trac63 can only speak for him/herself with that jpeg only comment.

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2017 at 20:55 UTC
In reply to:

DominicVII: Samsung made the best mirrorless cameras. Back in those days l was all set on pulling the trigger on the NX30, only to be told by a representative of my local camera store that Samsung would soon be disbanding their camera division. Those who wish to understand the nature of Korean corporatism and why Samsung might have abandoned the camera business will find clues in Bruce Cumings's study 'Korea's Place in the Sun'. Samsung and LG were always instruments of the Korean state and their primary aim is to intensify the flow of foreign exchange into Korea, i.e., only export-intensive products are to be manufactured; business projects that fail in this regard are put to death by the Korean state itself.

Be that as it may, in the future the camera business could have increased foreign exchange for Samsung.

The fact remains that a Samsung management change preceded the closing of the camera division.

Anyhow, as I'm sure you know, Samsung and LG both make things in China.

Setting aside the NX1, it is a stretch to say Samsung made the best mirrorless cameras for the era. The NX30 was decent. Samsung had PDAF on the sensor in advance of Fuji I believe. But like Samsung, Fuji had a good native lens selection. Sony didn't. (Now Sony does, but more for full framed mirrorless cameras.)

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2017 at 20:53 UTC
In reply to:

trac63: The big problem with Samsung's camera division was their pricing strategy. There was wide regional disparity in prices, and huge mark-ups on new models. The NX30 was priced well above the Nikon D5300, while the NX1 was double the street price of a Nikon D7100, and that was a huge problem. Almost all of their cameras were available at clearance price within a year of their introduction.

trac63:

"The RAW buffer on the D7100 is a non-issue, as most serious sports/action photographers shoot JPEG-only anyway."

No, you mean "it's not an issue for my purposes".

Now the D7200 solved the D7100 buffering issues, and I'm sure the D500 has better stills AF than the Samsung NX1.

Also: I'm not clear, do you, or did you, shoot with an NX500 or NX1?

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2017 at 20:44 UTC
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Did Samsung exit the market or did Samsung think there wouldn't be a continuing market...? I think it was more the second than the first, and the sales figures looked that way 3 years ago, but Samsung's been pleasantly wrong about this so far. I wouldn't be surprised if they re-entered at some point.

As for their 3-year-old camera still being essentially state of the art, well, Sony's A6000 is still very much a contender too. I think the key is that a lot of the high-end market has moved to FF, so the big emphasis has been on taking top sensor tech and using it to build FF sensors (which is MUCH harder), while APS-C sensor tech has been somewhat stuck for a few years.

ProfHank:

I think you're getting a little lost in the celebration of Sony's raw processing code.

True, I don't know that I could tell a 2005 APSC 14bit raw from an APSC 12 bit raw of the same era. But I can today, and have been able to for a few years now.

And back in 2005, if going for amazing colour subtly, I'd have used low ISO film.

I too think it too bad that Samsung dropped out.

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2017 at 18:28 UTC
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Did Samsung exit the market or did Samsung think there wouldn't be a continuing market...? I think it was more the second than the first, and the sales figures looked that way 3 years ago, but Samsung's been pleasantly wrong about this so far. I wouldn't be surprised if they re-entered at some point.

As for their 3-year-old camera still being essentially state of the art, well, Sony's A6000 is still very much a contender too. I think the key is that a lot of the high-end market has moved to FF, so the big emphasis has been on taking top sensor tech and using it to build FF sensors (which is MUCH harder), while APS-C sensor tech has been somewhat stuck for a few years.

ProfH:

"Sony's use of 12-bit recording in sensor modes where competitors using the same Sony sensor capture 14-bit basically tells me that the remaining 2 bits are essentially noise in those modes."

Perhaps, but we've been reading similar claims for 40 years now.

Then:

"However, random noise can actually improve apparent IQ."

Right, this is known about--adding jitter if you will. However, I remain unconvinced that what I'm seeing is simply random, since then the results shouldn't be consistent, yet they are.

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2017 at 16:59 UTC
In reply to:

fberns: I never understood Samsung's insanely stupid camera division. It took them ages to build at least a bit of a lens slection that makes more or less sense. (Fuji did a much much better job with starting their lens programme) and finally they had a wonderful camera just to find out they better stop the whole thing?

RMGoodlight:

As I wrote above:

"Like fberns, it seems you're more in the category of someone who didn't like the particular focal lengths Samsung chose to release."

And here you've agreed with me:

"Nobody is saying Samsung did not offer excelent lenses that might be inovative compared to other systems. There is no 85mm F1.4 for APSC and no 30mm F2 pancake in any other system. And I'm still tempted by their 16-50mm F2 and the 30mm. But Samsung made some odd choices."

You didn't answer: What's not pro about the 85mm f/1.4?

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2017 at 16:46 UTC
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Did Samsung exit the market or did Samsung think there wouldn't be a continuing market...? I think it was more the second than the first, and the sales figures looked that way 3 years ago, but Samsung's been pleasantly wrong about this so far. I wouldn't be surprised if they re-entered at some point.

As for their 3-year-old camera still being essentially state of the art, well, Sony's A6000 is still very much a contender too. I think the key is that a lot of the high-end market has moved to FF, so the big emphasis has been on taking top sensor tech and using it to build FF sensors (which is MUCH harder), while APS-C sensor tech has been somewhat stuck for a few years.

ProfH:

"so higher DR can get slightly reduced tonal resolution within a 32-pixel block. "

And that is likely what I'm seeing in Sony lossy raws. (Nikon's lossy raws seem good a bit better.)

Don't know that I'd ever commented on the DR of the Canon 5DIV. I know it's not as strong a higher ISO body as Canon thinks. Yes, it makes sense that dual pixels cost something in colour subtly.

Don't believe that I've ever compared Sony A6000 raws to raws from the A6500; that latter of course has a newer 24MP sensor--yes likely the same sensor series though.

Pentax, Fuji, Leica, Nikon, and Canon all offer APSC bodies with 14 bit raw recording, while Samsung also used to. There is no reason Sony can't do the same. And the first 4 on that list use Sony supplied sensors.

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2017 at 16:29 UTC
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Did Samsung exit the market or did Samsung think there wouldn't be a continuing market...? I think it was more the second than the first, and the sales figures looked that way 3 years ago, but Samsung's been pleasantly wrong about this so far. I wouldn't be surprised if they re-entered at some point.

As for their 3-year-old camera still being essentially state of the art, well, Sony's A6000 is still very much a contender too. I think the key is that a lot of the high-end market has moved to FF, so the big emphasis has been on taking top sensor tech and using it to build FF sensors (which is MUCH harder), while APS-C sensor tech has been somewhat stuck for a few years.

ProH:

No, it's that the nephew took over running the company. And he cut non-money making divisions.

Lossy raws don't look as good, and it's not simply an artifact issue. Please stop with the "it's only artifacts" claims, even if published. They look silly and disconnected from some of the weaknesses in lossy raws.

And yes, 12 bit raws have similar problems.

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2017 at 14:34 UTC
In reply to:

whyamihere: This story is anecdotal, but I think it's an allegory for what happened within Samsung Electronics, in regards to their camera division:

I have a colleague who visits International CES every year. After CES 2015, I asked him if he found anyone to speak with about Samsung's NX series of cameras, because he and I were both interested in their development strategy.

"I did manage to find the camera division on the [show] floor, nestled in the middle of the booth. They had engineers there, they knew how the cameras worked, and they were excited to show their stuff.

"The sad thing is, every time I asked them a question, they'd get five words in before someone in the background turned up a TV too loud, drowning out the conversation. And you could tell this was the life they'd resigned themselves to, because at least one of them would audibly sigh and slump a bit each time that happened. You couldn't help but feel bad for them."

Albert:

Except the reps at that show knew of the rumors. So you weren't the first to tell them of such.

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2017 at 13:34 UTC
In reply to:

gameshoes3003: EDIT: I must've confused this with the NX20, my bad.
I was tempted to buy one of these as my first camera. I'm glad that I didn't though because Samsung pulled out like 6 months after I bought my first camera. It looks like Samsung had something really impressive going on. It's a shame that we never got to see a successor to the NX1.

The NX20 had been supplanted by the NX30 by the time the NX1 was announced.

The point being if you were looking at an NX20 that was years before this NX1 released.

And I find it unlikely that many people would simply purchase $2600 camera/lens as their first "real" digital camera. But who knows you could have riches.

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2017 at 13:27 UTC
In reply to:

aftab: Samsung thought mirrorless would dominate in few years. Then they realized it will take much longer than they expected. On the top of that they probably were not making money selling cameras and lenses. This is in contrast to most other things they do. It's a shame, because they had excellent sensor technology and by that time they knew how to make very good cameras and lenses. It seems that camera business didn't fit their business strategy.

Zdman:

It was the nephew who took over, and as far as I know the uncle who backed the camera division is still alive.

(Also the nephew has been convicted of some kind of tax fraud.)

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2017 at 13:18 UTC
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