bobbarber

Joined on Oct 6, 2011

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Total: 1260, showing: 1 – 20
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On article How to buy used gear (and not get burned) (141 comments in total)
In reply to:

NikonJunkieGirl: I have sold alot of camera gear on eBay over the years, including a D200, a 10mm fisheye, a 12-24 DX, 17-55 DX and 18-200 DX, plus some FX things: 70-200 f/2.8 V2, 24-70 f/2.8 V1, and the venerable 14-24 f/2.8. Also a few Fujifilm cameras (X100 and X100S). A few years ago I bought a 60 f/2.8D Micro on eBay, mostly because I wasn't really sure I'd be keen on the focal length. I'm happy to say that $230 lens is my favorite now, better than my 50 or my 85 f/1.4 because... minimum focus distance. I wasn't interested in the 60G, as I have a "thing" for the D series. I have a number of G lenses (20, 24, 50, 85, 105), but I do love my D lenses: 35 f/2D, 60, 135 DC, 200 f/4 micro.

I've only been burned once on eBay--when I sold an iPhone to someone in India. They said they never got it, and now, I only sell within the continental U.S. with UPS tracking.

More recently, I sold my Df on eBay.

If I wanted to unload everything now, I would give it all to Adorama and let them cut me a check.

Tommi

Yes, but in the example I give above, if you get the package to Miami as a seller, you're good.

At that point you have proof of delivery from USPS or whoever.

If the courier loses it after that, tough luck.

By the way, I've been on both sides of that. I rented one of those boxes and services in South America, and used it to get an emergency used camera from ebay when my equipment was stolen. It worked so well, I got other stuff too.

Link | Posted on Aug 22, 2017 at 12:09 UTC
On article How to buy used gear (and not get burned) (141 comments in total)
In reply to:

NikonJunkieGirl: I have sold alot of camera gear on eBay over the years, including a D200, a 10mm fisheye, a 12-24 DX, 17-55 DX and 18-200 DX, plus some FX things: 70-200 f/2.8 V2, 24-70 f/2.8 V1, and the venerable 14-24 f/2.8. Also a few Fujifilm cameras (X100 and X100S). A few years ago I bought a 60 f/2.8D Micro on eBay, mostly because I wasn't really sure I'd be keen on the focal length. I'm happy to say that $230 lens is my favorite now, better than my 50 or my 85 f/1.4 because... minimum focus distance. I wasn't interested in the 60G, as I have a "thing" for the D series. I have a number of G lenses (20, 24, 50, 85, 105), but I do love my D lenses: 35 f/2D, 60, 135 DC, 200 f/4 micro.

I've only been burned once on eBay--when I sold an iPhone to someone in India. They said they never got it, and now, I only sell within the continental U.S. with UPS tracking.

More recently, I sold my Df on eBay.

If I wanted to unload everything now, I would give it all to Adorama and let them cut me a check.

I don't know about India, but when I lived in South America the mail was not very reliable. Employees opened packages and took things. I only point this out because it very well may not have been a scam a buyer ran on you. The poor person might have had their camera stolen. Maybe you both lost out.

Nowadays there are courier services that have a home base, say in Miami, with lots of mailbox addresses, like a UPS store. If you live in a foreign country, you pay for one of the mailbox addresses. Stuff gets delivered to a U.S. address. The courier service delivers it to your home country, bypassing the mail. You do have to pay customs, but the cost is minimal, and you get your item.

Link | Posted on Aug 22, 2017 at 03:49 UTC
In reply to:

everybodyisone: I know the article was not exactly about that BUT!!! Nowadays in the era of ebay and other places you can order stuff from china there are plenty amazing accessories for photographers for 10 usd or euro
so here is some:
- small led panel, 10 usd, it is amazing aprox 10* stronger than my phone camera led flash and dimmable uses two AA battery
- macro extension tube it was 7 usd/15 usd non AF/ AF
- any mount converter for sony e mount so I can use literally any lens, and for some like m42 and nikon F there are even tiltable ones for 5-15 usd, a lot fun!!!
- rocket style air blower 2 usd
- photo reflector bord disc 45 cm 10 usd
- electric tie holder , dunno 1 usd maybe? I put on the lens focus ring to know where it is set to, like a cheap follow focus system when shooting video
- mini photo studio box for product photography 15 usd
... add yours

You've got your smalls, and your bigs.

Ebay used to be for the smalls, but they changed their business model and favored the bigs. Big mistake. Part of ebay's appeal was the idiosyncracies of the site, the weird stuff you could find, etc. Now it's like Amazon, only worse.

Nobody wants to browse ebay stores that have a stock of 1,000,000 tripod screws from Hong Kong at 22 cents each. We were looking for the vintage bicycle you found in your barn, stuff like that.

Ebay needs to attract the smalls back, but it may be too late. Sites that focus specifically on crafts, etc. have taken away from what used to be ebay territory.

Link | Posted on Aug 21, 2017 at 15:50 UTC
On article How to buy used gear (and not get burned) (141 comments in total)
In reply to:

The_WB: In one form or another, a majority of sellers misrepresent the item they are selling. I had that today from a reputable seller through Amazon on a small garage door part.

Recourse against a rogue seller is tough given the seller is either out-of-state or in a foreign country.

Sometimes you can score a great deal from someone selling an item directly and they are truthful and honest. Other times, you get the opposite.

The Amazon story in PetaPixal is the dark side when using Amazon as the in between party and leave the customer holding the bag. Amazon marketplace -- I liken it to eBay or Craigs List. Caveat Emptor when it comes to making purchases from these sellers.

I came to a realization many moons ago, buy from the most reputable sellers, if at all possible. You will pay more, but if there is a problem, their reputation is what they are also selling. They know if it gets tarnished, it will take a lot to bring it back sterling again.

Eamon

I feel like you do.

ebay has made it harder on sellers in a number of ways (unfair feedback rules, higher fees, etc.) so a lot of people have just dropped out. Those who have stayed have to bend the rules to make a profit.

For this reason, I don't go for the "look for lots of sales, lots of feedback" rule. Example: I just bought a laptop battery that after a month is crappier than the failing battery it was supposed to replace. The seller has lots of sales and lots of feedback. I'll bet my experience was the same for a lot of buyers, but they can't submit feedback in time. My laptop is an older model and I'll bet all of the seller's batteries for my model are old. I was expecting recently manufactured. The listing should have said, "New, old stock."

I go more for hobby sellers who are established but obviously not professionals. I think their descriptions are usually fairer. They're not looking to pay rent on an unfair business model. They just want to get rid of stuff.

Link | Posted on Aug 21, 2017 at 15:35 UTC

Two favorite cheap things for me:

1) Tiny, portable tripod.

2) Bubble level that fits in flash socket

Link | Posted on Aug 21, 2017 at 15:18 UTC as 5th comment
On article How to buy used gear (and not get burned) (141 comments in total)
In reply to:

Father Bouvier: And the most important rule, don't buy from Amazon marketplace unless you are fine with being swindled: https://petapixel.com/2017/08/11/fell-victim-1500-used-camera-lens-scam-amazon/

I read the page. Wow!

I had something like this happen to me that was not a scam. Misdelivered.

Link | Posted on Aug 20, 2017 at 21:33 UTC
On article How to buy used gear (and not get burned) (141 comments in total)
In reply to:

The_WB: In one form or another, a majority of sellers misrepresent the item they are selling. I had that today from a reputable seller through Amazon on a small garage door part.

Recourse against a rogue seller is tough given the seller is either out-of-state or in a foreign country.

Sometimes you can score a great deal from someone selling an item directly and they are truthful and honest. Other times, you get the opposite.

The Amazon story in PetaPixal is the dark side when using Amazon as the in between party and leave the customer holding the bag. Amazon marketplace -- I liken it to eBay or Craigs List. Caveat Emptor when it comes to making purchases from these sellers.

I came to a realization many moons ago, buy from the most reputable sellers, if at all possible. You will pay more, but if there is a problem, their reputation is what they are also selling. They know if it gets tarnished, it will take a lot to bring it back sterling again.

@Father Bouvier

It depends on the listing. The default if you offer returns on your listing is "Buyer pays return shipping." Here's an example: http://www.ebay.com/itm/NIKON-D7200-24-2MP-3-2SCREEN-DIGITAL-SLR-CAMERA-BODY-ONLY-SHUTTER-COUNT-3417/331944450838?_trkparms=aid%3D555017%26algo%3DPL.CASSINI%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D20150817211623%26meid%3D7d169d271f8849e081674facf63d05f2%26pid%3D100505%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D1%26&_trksid=p2045573.c100505.m3226

Now, if the item is misrepresented, you can get around that, but don't make it sound like it's an easy thing to do. It can be easy, but it can also be time consuming. I've had everything happen from the seller saying, "Just keep it," (item didn't work, he knew it), to a 3-day decision in my favor, to a knock-down drag out month-long back and forth, where the seller insisted his item wasn't defective (it was, and I won the case.)

So yes, but not everybody wants to go through that.

Link | Posted on Aug 20, 2017 at 21:19 UTC
On article How to buy used gear (and not get burned) (141 comments in total)
In reply to:

The_WB: In one form or another, a majority of sellers misrepresent the item they are selling. I had that today from a reputable seller through Amazon on a small garage door part.

Recourse against a rogue seller is tough given the seller is either out-of-state or in a foreign country.

Sometimes you can score a great deal from someone selling an item directly and they are truthful and honest. Other times, you get the opposite.

The Amazon story in PetaPixal is the dark side when using Amazon as the in between party and leave the customer holding the bag. Amazon marketplace -- I liken it to eBay or Craigs List. Caveat Emptor when it comes to making purchases from these sellers.

I came to a realization many moons ago, buy from the most reputable sellers, if at all possible. You will pay more, but if there is a problem, their reputation is what they are also selling. They know if it gets tarnished, it will take a lot to bring it back sterling again.

Krav Maga

But there are advantages to craigslist too.

If you return something on ebay, you almost always have to pay return shipping. That can be a considerable amount of money for something like a printer you bought from the other side of the country.

With craigslist, the printer may already be set up in the seller's house. You can ask to see a nozzle check printed, etc. With a camera, you can obviously put it through it's paces.

I agree with you about buyer protections on ebay. They're awesome. I've relied on them a few times. But craigslist is not totally without merit.

Link | Posted on Aug 20, 2017 at 20:49 UTC
On article How to buy used gear (and not get burned) (141 comments in total)
In reply to:

bobbarber: ebay has always worked for me. I've had to invoke buyer protection a couple of times, but they've always backed me up.

There are also good deals on craigslist if you're patient. No buyer protection there though. A lot of ripoff artists too. You really have to look.

One good trick on both platforms is to look for a camera and lens deal, even if you have the lens. You can sell the lens and your total cost is low because the camera and lens together are already priced lower than they would be separately.

EDIT: One more trick is to look for items marked "For parts only" on ebay. Sometimes they work but have some minor flaw that you can fix or live with that a seller felt obligated to list. There are honest sellers on ebay. I'm one. 100% feedback, and I never misrepresent an item. There are others out there.

Marty,

In addition, craigslist provides good leads to actual garage sales. That is often where the best deals are, in my experience!

Link | Posted on Aug 20, 2017 at 19:32 UTC
On article How to buy used gear (and not get burned) (141 comments in total)
In reply to:

bobbarber: ebay has always worked for me. I've had to invoke buyer protection a couple of times, but they've always backed me up.

There are also good deals on craigslist if you're patient. No buyer protection there though. A lot of ripoff artists too. You really have to look.

One good trick on both platforms is to look for a camera and lens deal, even if you have the lens. You can sell the lens and your total cost is low because the camera and lens together are already priced lower than they would be separately.

EDIT: One more trick is to look for items marked "For parts only" on ebay. Sometimes they work but have some minor flaw that you can fix or live with that a seller felt obligated to list. There are honest sellers on ebay. I'm one. 100% feedback, and I never misrepresent an item. There are others out there.

Oldbike

I agree. I question people about what I'm buying. Usually it's something I'm familiar with myself, so I can get an idea of whether or not they know the equipment and have used the equipment. I don't want to support anybody who is stealing stuff. Still, it's possible to be fooled!

Link | Posted on Aug 20, 2017 at 19:30 UTC
On article How to buy used gear (and not get burned) (141 comments in total)
In reply to:

bobbarber: ebay has always worked for me. I've had to invoke buyer protection a couple of times, but they've always backed me up.

There are also good deals on craigslist if you're patient. No buyer protection there though. A lot of ripoff artists too. You really have to look.

One good trick on both platforms is to look for a camera and lens deal, even if you have the lens. You can sell the lens and your total cost is low because the camera and lens together are already priced lower than they would be separately.

EDIT: One more trick is to look for items marked "For parts only" on ebay. Sometimes they work but have some minor flaw that you can fix or live with that a seller felt obligated to list. There are honest sellers on ebay. I'm one. 100% feedback, and I never misrepresent an item. There are others out there.

Oh, I've gotten some deals on craiglist.

You just have to be careful, as you say.

Link | Posted on Aug 20, 2017 at 15:46 UTC
On article How to buy used gear (and not get burned) (141 comments in total)
In reply to:

bobbarber: ebay has always worked for me. I've had to invoke buyer protection a couple of times, but they've always backed me up.

There are also good deals on craigslist if you're patient. No buyer protection there though. A lot of ripoff artists too. You really have to look.

One good trick on both platforms is to look for a camera and lens deal, even if you have the lens. You can sell the lens and your total cost is low because the camera and lens together are already priced lower than they would be separately.

EDIT: One more trick is to look for items marked "For parts only" on ebay. Sometimes they work but have some minor flaw that you can fix or live with that a seller felt obligated to list. There are honest sellers on ebay. I'm one. 100% feedback, and I never misrepresent an item. There are others out there.

The dust thing is ridiculous.

You can Google pictures taken with lenses with severely cracked front elements, and the effect is not that great on IQ.

But, yeah.

"Is there any dust inside the lens?"

Argh.

Link | Posted on Aug 20, 2017 at 15:39 UTC
On article How to buy used gear (and not get burned) (141 comments in total)

ebay has always worked for me. I've had to invoke buyer protection a couple of times, but they've always backed me up.

There are also good deals on craigslist if you're patient. No buyer protection there though. A lot of ripoff artists too. You really have to look.

One good trick on both platforms is to look for a camera and lens deal, even if you have the lens. You can sell the lens and your total cost is low because the camera and lens together are already priced lower than they would be separately.

EDIT: One more trick is to look for items marked "For parts only" on ebay. Sometimes they work but have some minor flaw that you can fix or live with that a seller felt obligated to list. There are honest sellers on ebay. I'm one. 100% feedback, and I never misrepresent an item. There are others out there.

Link | Posted on Aug 20, 2017 at 14:46 UTC as 67th comment | 7 replies

This is "The Painted Word" applied to photography.

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2017 at 18:24 UTC as 103rd comment

I like the tweet and I like the message.

Obama was flawed. He greatly increased the surveillance state, for one. But he was orders of magnitude less flawed than Trump. They're on different levels of humanity.

I'm sick of the hyper-partisanship in the U.S. I'm also sick of the racism. I'm not a big fan of Obama, but he was at least an average president. I've been around 55 years, and we've had worse presidents in my lifetime. The fact that republicans constantly circle back to him as a target reveals more about their prejudices than they think.

Trump is terrible, but even he is not completely wrong about everything, all the time. We've stopped listening to each other. We root for the laundry, like basketball fans. If the bad guy is on our team, we love him. If he's on the other side, we criticize him constantly. We need to start looking at facts, and get away from preconceived notions.

Link | Posted on Aug 16, 2017 at 23:28 UTC as 62nd comment | 1 reply

Lame. Not sure how anybody justifies this.

Link | Posted on Aug 16, 2017 at 23:15 UTC as 69th comment
In reply to:

boatphotog: The real "problem" with phone photography has nothing to do with the technical aspects of the camera related capabilities of the specific phone. The real problem for people serious about photographic images (please note that I didn't say "Photographic Equipment") is that the proliferation of throw away garbage images produced by people with absolutely no training or ability will lead to the numbing of public appreciation of photographic images produced by skilled photographers. Some, myself included, will say that phone photography has already achieved this effect. This in turn leads to turning a once respected artform into yet another ho hum, been there/done that victim of technology.

LIghten up.

Nobody cares about your technically perfect landscape when what they really want is pictures of their kids. They also don't want to hire you to follow them around at the barbecue and take pictures.

Music is art, too. Are you against people banging out songs for fun on guitar at home, just because they're way below the standards of professional musicians?

Give me a break.

Link | Posted on Aug 16, 2017 at 14:31 UTC

Face it. The article's correct.

What makes a good photograph for most people is subject matter, period.

If they can capture the subject matter adequately--kids, vacation spots, the family dog--they they're satisfied. And phones can do that now.

I bet most people here have had the experience of a "non-photographer" going through a photo album and picking out shots that the photographer doesn't think are that good. It's because their cat or their grandkid is in the picture.

The one area phones fall down for people who want snapshots is zoom, which is why I think travel zooms (a category I've always liked) will remain popular.

Link | Posted on Aug 16, 2017 at 14:29 UTC as 32nd comment

It's pretty easy to see how this works, and it undercuts the arguments of the FF folks.

As sensors and technology get better, we'll need LESS camera, not MORE.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2017 at 03:23 UTC as 111th comment
In reply to:

MargoB: The photo is amazing in an obviously awful way. And I'm sick to death of people defending Nazis and white supremacists by saying BUT BUT BUT. You either support equality or you don't. Fess up and pick a side, a-holes.

I gave you a like, but some of the fault lies with the counterprotestors.

First of all, I'm 100% on the side of the counterprotestors.

Just so that's out of the way.

But when we did direct action back in the day (Nevada Nuclear Test Site, Rocky Flats, etc.) we underwent extensive nonviolence training. We were risking arrest and knew we might get beaten, etc. We practiced how to de-escalate situations.

A lot of the fist-fights, etc. in Charlottesville were disheartening. They play into the "two sides" narrative.

Many counterprotestors obviously had no nonviolence training at all. The spirit was there, but not the organization.

Guys like Gandhi and Martin Luther King weren't lucky. They were brilliant. They planned. Images of African Americans sprayed with firehoses moved all of America. But if your side is punching too, people quickly lose sympathy for you.

Just my thoughts. Best.

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2017 at 22:51 UTC
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