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Sirandar

Lives in Canada Guelph, Canada
Joined on Oct 29, 2004

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Total: 254, showing: 1 – 20
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On article A photographer's guide to Cuba (44 comments in total)
In reply to:

Contra Mundum: How about a photographer's guide to North Korea, or Hitler Germany, or Fascist Italy? Talking about taking wonderful nature shots, etc. in a communist/fascist/nazist dictatorship is absolutely immoral.

How about the worst of the lot Trump America

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2016 at 04:00 UTC
In reply to:

Sirandar: Normal investment venues are about disempowering investors

KickStarter is about empowering investors

Neither work because investment is really about treating investors like prostitutes and visa versa.

Three key shifts in core values are required for Project Centric Investment:

SAP must be used to completely open the books on what makers are doing with our money. That way they know the company is legit and their investment is at least mostly being directed at the project they invested in.

The patent system as we know it needs to be dis-empowered. It is broken anyway and ignores the reality of the world economy. A more sane and un-hindering process needs to replace it that gives realistic benefits to those who actually innovate. The process also needs to be called exactly what it is "Protection from Competition". Intellectual Property is an illusion backed by the legal and patent industry ... In reality only secrets and protection from competition, and fruitless lawsuits

The focus of investment needs to shift from companies to projects (including multi company projects).

Link | Posted on Aug 10, 2016 at 14:41 UTC
In reply to:

Sirandar: Normal investment venues are about disempowering investors

KickStarter is about empowering investors

Neither work because investment is really about treating investors like prostitutes and visa versa.

I know I have actually tried it. Successful grounded companies have no desire or incentive to burden the risk of other people's money unless the odds are very heavily stacked in their favour. They will politely say no otherwise.

Flakey ungrounded companies will happily take investors money and give as little back as they can get away with.

Hence we have dis-empowerment

Kickstarter allows the investor to directly invest in a project they feel is socially and economically important. It is a half done attempt and even that half isn't very well thought out.

Link | Posted on Aug 10, 2016 at 14:37 UTC
In reply to:

Sirandar: Normal investment venues are about disempowering investors

KickStarter is about empowering investors

Neither work because investment is really about treating investors like prostitutes and visa versa.

To tr573

You are so well trained you cannot even see the dis-empowerment.

Traditional investment: You press a button on you computer and it goes to some magic entity called a company. Then you watch magic numbers on your computer that tells you the value of your investment. Then once a quarter or year you get a report from the company with all sorts of pretty pictures of people that probably don't even work for the company and charts and graphs which may or may not be accurate and representative. You believe that some government agency is actually ensuring the accuracy and truth of these claims. You forget that in 2008 almost the entire financial industry was caught with its hand in the cookie jar.

Investors will always be dis-empowered unless they can invest in PROJECTS not companies unless they have enough big money to make a deal directly with a company and sign a contract giving them SAP level access to information. Functionally nobody does this .....

Link | Posted on Aug 10, 2016 at 14:26 UTC

Normal investment venues are about disempowering investors

KickStarter is about empowering investors

Neither work because investment is really about treating investors like prostitutes and visa versa.

Link | Posted on Aug 10, 2016 at 01:41 UTC as 18th comment | 5 replies

This type of thing happens in every city, more or less. I had two visiting Brazilian students who were quite convinced that every single person in Brazil gets robbed or is a victim of theft sooner or later, but on further examination they admitted that have never been robbed, but have been the victim of theft.

It should also be noted that robbery and theft is only the beginning of a long chain of criminal activity. The stolen goods will need a safe storage location and then they must be fenced which is also a criminal activity. Then the stolen good are moved to another geographic location. Finally there is a person who buys the stolen goods, often knowingly or at least partially knowingly. Also a crime.

Then there is the insurance companies that claim to protect from theft, but when you read the fine print really doesn't.

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2016 at 19:12 UTC as 71st comment
In reply to:

Charlie Jin: I think that it is a matter of view point. They would call it "redistribution", not robbery.

But not if it happens to them .... then it would be grounds for homicide.

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2016 at 18:50 UTC
In reply to:

Roadrunner123: I think this is theft not robbery. There was no violence or even the threat of violence. This is really shoddy, illiterate reporting.

You are correct .... it is theft of property not robbery. Both are criminal behavior

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2016 at 18:43 UTC
In reply to:

mcshan: Sorry but this would not have happened to me.

So trust and a second inattention is justification for thievery? Would it be justification for murder and kidnapping too?

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2016 at 18:37 UTC
In reply to:

Gesture: I wouldn't want it known that I had succumbed to that rouse.

Blame the victim not the thief ..... so if he was robbed at gunpoint it would have been better? Thievery is thievery .... at least this time it didn't end in murder.

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2016 at 18:34 UTC
In reply to:

Tord S Eriksson: This video is a lovely one, very professionally made, and made almost entirely with a7s cameras.

But that was not the impression it gave silly ol' me.

It, sadly, gave me the impression that it was made with the help of the a6000, the camera the movie was about. But that was not so, Barnaby tells us. Now.

How easily we are fooled.

LOL ..... ins't this just like Huawei shooting their smartphone advertisement pictures on a sDLR?

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2016 at 13:22 UTC
On article Samyang teases 'summer blockbuster' lens announcements (124 comments in total)
In reply to:

Krich13: I think that the first release clarifies the things quite a bit.

1. "5 lenses for 5 weeks" means one lens (or a variation of an existing lens such as a cine version) a week in 5 mounts.
2. No dedicated mirrorless designs. There aren't 5 mirrorless mounts out there (or am I wrong? E-mount, m43, Fuji FX -- anything else? Meaning, SLR lenses with built-in adapter tubes for mirrorless cameras.
3. We are all excited about Samyang announcement of AF lenses for E-mount. But for 5 mounts at the same time? Not a chance.

Bottom line, large and heavy MF lenses (again). Some blockbuster indeed.

The manufacturers just refuse to release decent sized and decent priced prime lenses above 100mm for M4/3. I would love a cheap light 150mm F3 for my Oly system. Their 75-300 lens is actually really good, but far to slow for many situations,

It is like an embargo. Which makes no sense for Pano or Oly as they have no FF or dSLR line to worry about,

Yes Pana makes a superb 40-150 Pro and a 300mm prime .... far too heavy and expensive. I did buy the 12-40 oly pro and it is a great lens worth it on sale, but partly because its weight is offset by that it replaces quite a few of my other lenses and it handles well..... and overall a fantastic lens.

Link | Posted on Aug 1, 2016 at 16:29 UTC
In reply to:

Sirandar: interesting.... but I can't see how these infrared images can detect planetary size mass objects unless that means a star which has a decent probability of having a planet ... which is misleading

Google is my friend .... lazy me...

A planetary-mass object (PMO), planemo[101] /ˈplænᵻmoʊ/, or planetary body is a celestial object with a mass that falls within the range of the definition of a planet: massive enough to achieve hydrostatic equilibrium (to be rounded under its own gravity), but not enough to sustain core fusion like a star.[102][103] By definition, all planets are planetary-mass objects, but the purpose of this term is to refer to objects that do not conform to typical expectations for a planet. These include dwarf planets, which are rounded by their own gravity but not massive enough to clear their own orbit, the larger moons, and free-floating planemos, which may have been ejected from a system (rogue planets) or formed through cloud-collapse rather than accretion (sometimes called sub-brown dwarfs)"

Makes perfect sense now

Link | Posted on Jul 12, 2016 at 21:01 UTC

interesting.... but I can't see how these infrared images can detect planetary size mass objects unless that means a star which has a decent probability of having a planet ... which is misleading

Link | Posted on Jul 12, 2016 at 15:48 UTC as 12th comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

Sirandar: If they were really trying to cheat they would have wiped the EXIF. It is probably a simple case of the photographic work being contracted to the lowest bidder who may have then purchased the image elsewhere.

Or they flew that model into Shanghai to take the picture with a DSLR, did the shoot and then left the EXIF info in.

The right hand often has no clue what the left is doing in many companies.

PS .... my 2 previous posts are mostly tongue and cheek because I found your comment below strangely comforting:

"So, if a bank or corporation is large enough, large enough for the "right hand - left hand" confusion you describe, we should all give it a free pass to trample ethics? Your parents and teachers might be wincing to know you said this."

Link | Posted on Jul 12, 2016 at 05:12 UTC
In reply to:

Sirandar: If they were really trying to cheat they would have wiped the EXIF. It is probably a simple case of the photographic work being contracted to the lowest bidder who may have then purchased the image elsewhere.

Or they flew that model into Shanghai to take the picture with a DSLR, did the shoot and then left the EXIF info in.

The right hand often has no clue what the left is doing in many companies.

Since you like to think about ethics ... Huawei is a Chinese corporation and objectively corruption and lack of "ethics" is rampant in China. Employees grey incomes often dwarf above the table incomes. But in China corruption is systemic and expected and part of doing business so it is relatively self limiting and has social boundaries.

The really big payoffs for corruption and lack of ethics is when nobody is expecting it, like the leadup and actuality of the 2008 financial collapse.

My fav peeve is "When I click buy on Itunes, why doesn't it say how much the Label gets and how much Itunes gets and how much the artist gets, is it technically impossible??"

Simple answer "Itunes and the Labels don't want you to know" You can try to figure it out second hand sort of 9cents of 99...... proper SAP could do it.

Link | Posted on Jul 12, 2016 at 04:41 UTC
In reply to:

Sirandar: If they were really trying to cheat they would have wiped the EXIF. It is probably a simple case of the photographic work being contracted to the lowest bidder who may have then purchased the image elsewhere.

Or they flew that model into Shanghai to take the picture with a DSLR, did the shoot and then left the EXIF info in.

The right hand often has no clue what the left is doing in many companies.

Justification ...... not a word I like or use. I wasn't attempting to justify or divert blame, simply stated what probably happened. Ethics, a nice word trampled currently on a mass scale and throughout history. Right now photographers worldwide have felt the boot of corporate ethics. The milk is practically free! Except wedding milk, which tends to sour quickly sometimes unless the photographer is also a magician.

I think I might purchase some Axe cologne so 10 supermodels will fall into my arms. And BTW, Coke and coffee are really really good for you, its just a coincidence that they are addictive and profitable, and the models in their commercials are so beautiful/healthy looking.

PS .. most of my teachers are from the generation just before me, and try as I might, I can't achieve their level of lack of ethics. As my fortunes slowly dwindle due to corporate's fling with permanent "temporary" contract employment (among other things) , I may need to eventually up my game.

Link | Posted on Jul 12, 2016 at 04:14 UTC
In reply to:

Sirandar: Like in all aspects of life, trying to detect cheating after the fact only selects for people better at cheating.

An interesting analogy, but limited.

If there was an obvious indicator that there was something in your house that would make someone famous, your front door lock wouldn't be picked but it would be stolen almost immediately. Breakins are usually a desperate measure as there is no way know how much benefit there is to be had, and then the goods need to be fenced.

Cheating is absolutely rampant in our current job culture and this is partially why the Internet is so ineffective at allocating true employment opportunity.

The reputation of the publisher is a very nebulous concept, very difficult to assess unless you actually know said publisher. The classic was WMD in Iraq, how many publishers dropped the ball there, or kept quiet until the deed was done.

Link | Posted on Jul 12, 2016 at 03:59 UTC

If they were really trying to cheat they would have wiped the EXIF. It is probably a simple case of the photographic work being contracted to the lowest bidder who may have then purchased the image elsewhere.

Or they flew that model into Shanghai to take the picture with a DSLR, did the shoot and then left the EXIF info in.

The right hand often has no clue what the left is doing in many companies.

Link | Posted on Jul 6, 2016 at 22:31 UTC as 17th comment | 4 replies

Like in all aspects of life, trying to detect cheating after the fact only selects for people better at cheating.

Link | Posted on Jul 6, 2016 at 22:15 UTC as 11th comment | 3 replies
Total: 254, showing: 1 – 20
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