SkvLTD

SkvLTD

Works as a Freelancer
Has a website at http://skvoraltdphoto.com
Joined on Apr 3, 2013

Comments

Total: 22, showing: 1 – 20
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On photo Dragonfly in Flight Close Up in the Best picture of the Week challenge (41 comments in total)

Very nicely done! Did anyone who critiqued even try one of these shots, ever? They're very bloody difficult.

Link | Posted on Sep 5, 2017 at 01:47 UTC as 4th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Edmond Leung: They didn't get the right people to run the business.
They should learn more from Canon how to successfully run such conglomerate before going to this business.

Nikon*

Link | Posted on Jul 6, 2017 at 14:57 UTC
In reply to:

PRohmer: The only Samsung products I was ever satisfied with were a vacuum cleaner and a fridge.

Agreed. After Galaxy S2, everything else turned into progressive garbage. Some TVs were ok too.

Link | Posted on Jul 6, 2017 at 14:56 UTC
On article Pentax KP Review (665 comments in total)

Grips are cool, the pancakes are probably one Pentax piece of glass I'll forever personally like, but good GOD this thing is ugly. Nothing can touch the Df in terms of aesthetics.

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2017 at 01:42 UTC as 10th comment | 1 reply
On article Nikon D5600 review: making connectivity a snap? (369 comments in total)
In reply to:

Iloveaircraftnoise: These 5000 series Nikons are fantastic little machines. I love the pictures they take. I really want to buy this 5500 or 5600 for its big 3.2 inch screen. I owned the d5100 previously which also took fantastic photographs. The only thing that lets the 5000 series down is the tiny viewfinder. Its just way too small. You can barely see anything through it. The the viewfinders in the canon rebels (or whatever they're called) are bigger & brighter.

IMO the real plague of the oldies is the lower rez LCD that makes focus checking much, much less accurate than the newer bodies.

Link | Posted on Mar 2, 2017 at 05:00 UTC
In reply to:

Patcheye: XT-2 looks very similar to my old Asahi Pentax K1000 - which is still used occasionally - wonder whether this one will still be usable in 30 - 40 years time?

Also almost all electronics rely on solder point which wear and deteriorate over time as well, so there are FAR too many limiting factor to the ageing process than of the old mechanical beasts.

Link | Posted on Feb 8, 2017 at 05:46 UTC
In reply to:

Gordon7373: All this fuss over aesthetics! As a retired professional I always (as one should) put aesthetics a long, long way behind form and function, after all a camera is a tool.
Yes, sorry, I do want to make a point here. My career started way back in the analogue days and I truly thought the black body cameras were head and shoulders above the silver ones in looks. But I always bought the silver model. Why? Try reading the dials and navigating the controls of an all black camera in very low light. now try it with a silver camera - chalk and cheese!

Unless that graphite is basically a paint coat that can get scuffed off, and good luck touching up that vs just black.

Link | Posted on Feb 8, 2017 at 05:44 UTC
On article Shaking up the market: Pentax K-70 Review (366 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike Hiran: It seems unfair that you will compare this to mirrorless cameras in things like weight, but when it comes to battery life you call the k70 worst in class though the same mirrorless cameras you compare the k70 to earlier have less battery life than the k70. Quite the double standard.

Was that in conclusion or what? The first page pits it against its own competitors and it's not exactly shining aside from the price.

Link | Posted on Nov 16, 2016 at 03:08 UTC
On article Shaking up the market: Pentax K-70 Review (366 comments in total)
In reply to:

joelfoto: My very first camera was a solid Pentax KX with a razor sharp 50 f1.8 and i took great photos with it. Traded it for a Nikkormat (a lovely hunk!) then a Canon dslr and still took great photos but missing that Pentax "feel". I am going to czech this K-70 out!

Er, bloody comment section shifted..

Link | Posted on Nov 16, 2016 at 03:07 UTC
On article New kid on the block: YI M1 review (712 comments in total)

4/3 and only contrast-detect? Ehhhhh........

Link | Posted on Oct 18, 2016 at 04:24 UTC as 115th comment | 2 replies
On article The long, difficult road to Pentax full-frame (609 comments in total)

Seems like this is more of a poor man's medium-esque-ish format camera than a competitive semi/pro's choice, so Pentax is still looking away from their best possible customers - pros!

Link | Posted on May 12, 2016 at 09:46 UTC as 3rd comment
On article First Impressions: Metabones Speed Booster (356 comments in total)

So this thing gives you the worst of crop sensor combined with the worst of a full frame, but sounds very appealing. The ~$4-600 these things cost are usually about what you'd need to just get a proper FF body and get the best of all worlds.

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2015 at 12:41 UTC as 8th comment
On article Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path (1622 comments in total)
In reply to:

wsalopek: Full frame is, generally speaking, for ONE thing...best low-light / hi-iso / sports performance, (and to a lesser extent, for max subject isolation (but there are work-arounds for smaller sensors to achieve much the same isolation)).

If a person doesn't need that, then APS-C or MFT, or even smaller-sized sensors, do FANTASTIC, and at the same time, you almost certainly spend less money, and have much smaller/lighter hardware to haul around, which is HUGE in getting the picture you want, as the best camera is the one you have WITH you.

Haha, right? And plenty phones are waterproof today as well.

Link | Posted on Jan 21, 2015 at 11:37 UTC
On article Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path (1622 comments in total)
In reply to:

jrkliny: When I started DSLR photography, I opted for an APS-C camera and lenses. I like the smaller size, lower weight and lower cost. To me full frame is a case of high cost for diminishing returns. I am still looking to upgrade but not to something bigger. I am looking forward to the time when we can get even small lighter gear with better image quality and better capabilities. That day seems to be coming rapidly especially since we are seeing only minimal improvements in DSLR technology.

Its just like cars - unless you're a pro racer, you don't need a race car that will guzzle your money in one sitting. Sure its nice to have, but without a return on that investment its utterly unnecessary.

Link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 03:58 UTC
On article Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path (1622 comments in total)
In reply to:

obsolescence: I started with Olympus Four Thirds, which is now basically obsolete and the lenses are not worth much. Obsolescence (that's my moniker) is the lifeblood of the tech industry, including photography. It's also very likely the future of the human species on this degraded planet, so we had better enjoy what we have while we still can. That means not spending all our discretionary money on photo gear just to have the latest and greatest.

All nice for a hobby.

Link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 03:55 UTC
On article Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path (1622 comments in total)
In reply to:

mosc: You know, Metabones keeps the truth in the upgrade path for people who are willing to give it a go. Get a speed booster and an E-mount body and you have yourself FF glass utilized on a less expensive body.

Are these signal boosters still a way of cutting corners on getting the proper equipment for the purpose or are they relatively substantial in what they do? Else, FOV remains the same, right?

Link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 03:53 UTC
On article Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path (1622 comments in total)
In reply to:

SmilerGrogan: There is only one minor quibble I have with this well-written and well thought out essay.

The "but" is that while micro 4/3rds people have lots of great f/2.8 lenses, owners of Nikon and Canon APS-C cameras don't really have much of an upgrade path...If you've grown beyond your variable aperture kit zooms, there is really nothing from either Nikon or Canon once you've bought a 17-55 f/2.8 (both of which are gigantic, but perhaps that's what it takes to get decent performance from a lens like that).

Neither Nikon nor Canon make an f/2.8 wide angle prime or f/2.8 wide angle zoom for the image circle of APS-C cameras. Yes there are nice third party lenses, but some people prefer to stick with mfr lenses for a variety of reasons.

And finally, neither company makes a telephoto option for those wishing to move up to an APS-C circle f2.8 70-200 zoom. So for those of us who own Nikons or Canons, we are stuck with either going full frame, or switching to Olympus, Panasonic, or Fuji.

Well micros /need/ higher apertures to achieve the same performance as larger sensors, so it's more of a necessity in that realm to still be competitive with the rest of the market.

And APS-C really honestly caps off at the enthusiast level these days since pros need bigger and better by the minute, so it makes perfect sense that the companies aren't investing into a cheaper market. They can make that 11-24/2.8, but costing often more than 2x the camera itself, majority of their market will never pick one up.

Link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 03:51 UTC
On article Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path (1622 comments in total)

Its like a Honda vs Porsche debate for a daily driver- both will get you to work, just one significantly faster and more reliable at high speeds than the other. If you're an ER surgeon, that 5 minute difference makes or breaks your job. Otherwise there are simple enthusiasts who seek that cream of the crop without price being a question.

Link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 03:44 UTC as 195th comment | 4 replies
On article Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path (1622 comments in total)
In reply to:

wsalopek: Full frame is, generally speaking, for ONE thing...best low-light / hi-iso / sports performance, (and to a lesser extent, for max subject isolation (but there are work-arounds for smaller sensors to achieve much the same isolation)).

If a person doesn't need that, then APS-C or MFT, or even smaller-sized sensors, do FANTASTIC, and at the same time, you almost certainly spend less money, and have much smaller/lighter hardware to haul around, which is HUGE in getting the picture you want, as the best camera is the one you have WITH you.

Definitely. If you encounter adverse environments enough, you want the best gear possible, but otherwise it really is unnecessary.

Link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 03:42 UTC
In reply to:

lera ion: My next FX will not be Nikon.

Honestly, I like my day/week long lasting batteries and OVF to even begin considering mirrorless. And the boot up time?

Link | Posted on Jan 11, 2015 at 21:16 UTC
Total: 22, showing: 1 – 20
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