yukonchris

yukonchris

Lives in Canada Whitehorse, Canada
Works as a Educator/Artist
Has a website at http://www.wheeler.ca
Joined on Nov 9, 2007

Comments

Total: 44, showing: 1 – 20
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Not interested in any of these cameras, frankly, but I enjoy the debate and the information so I checked the DxO scores. As good as the top three must be, the one item from that list that immediately caught my eye was how good the Pentax K1 was at half the price. I shoot Olympus and don't own any modern Nikon, Pentax or Sony gear, but if I was in the market, and if I was really interested in what DxO had to say about things, I'd give Pentax a good long look. I think it makes sense to support companies that are offering value for money, and helping to keep things competitive to some degree on that front, and yeah, I imagine someone will raise the lens issues but whatever...

Link | Posted on Oct 7, 2017 at 19:42 UTC as 67th comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

yukonchris: There are definitely things we humans do to animals that are very wrong and shameful, but that is not the case with bears at a dump. I live in Canada's north and I can tell you that bears are scavengers - it is very natural for them. For bears, a dump is a kind of smörgåsbord of goodness. They'll pick through garbage and find what they want. Unlike animals that are caged up, no one forced the bears to go to the dump. They went there because they liked what they were smelling. In fact, for older bears that have lost the ability to fend for themselves in the wilderness, the dump may even be a lifeline of sorts. If that dump was located in Canada's north, there would probably be thousands of miles of unspoiled forest all around. The bear may well have a choice.

In northern Canada, the environment is generally quite healthy, and while I agree with you regarding the issues with plastics, we have very active recycling programs in place, at least in the Yukon. Bears, still visit dumps unless the dump is surrounded by an electric fence, and even then they will occasionally get in. Bears, like people, use their environment to their own best interest. Last year, we had a very good year here resulting in lots of bear cubs surviving the winter and a minor population explosion. Now, those bears are competing for territory - they are very territorial. Weaker animals will get forced out by stronger, or more established bears. Is that our fault? Where will those bears go? Just like human's, animals can overpopulate existing territory. Anyway, yes, we need to do our best to look after the environment and get rid of plastics properly, but this photo is probably not telling the story that some think it is. That bear may feel quite pleased with itself.

Link | Posted on Oct 7, 2017 at 19:18 UTC

There are definitely things we humans do to animals that are very wrong and shameful, but that is not the case with bears at a dump. I live in Canada's north and I can tell you that bears are scavengers - it is very natural for them. For bears, a dump is a kind of smörgåsbord of goodness. They'll pick through garbage and find what they want. Unlike animals that are caged up, no one forced the bears to go to the dump. They went there because they liked what they were smelling. In fact, for older bears that have lost the ability to fend for themselves in the wilderness, the dump may even be a lifeline of sorts. If that dump was located in Canada's north, there would probably be thousands of miles of unspoiled forest all around. The bear may well have a choice.

Link | Posted on Oct 7, 2017 at 17:16 UTC as 143rd comment | 11 replies
On article The Sony a9 is a 24MP sports-shooting powerhouse (1909 comments in total)

While I've never been a big fan of Sony cameras, it seems proper to give credit where credit is due. Sony continues to lead and push the curve in sensor design, and like Olympus, they are also working to impress in terms of camera features, especially speed, size, and responsiveness. Other makers take note - pull up your socks or you may risk becoming largely irrelevant, at least in the field of photography.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2017 at 03:07 UTC as 40th comment

Interesting photos and good lens choice. though I too wonder why the photographer would intentionally compensate under in snowy conditions. Living in the Yukon, where snow is the order of the day for almost half the year, compensation by +0.7 - +2.0 is much more likely to result in good images in winter conditions. As for the toughness of the camera, I have little doubt that it performed well. Over the years, I have found Olympus cameras to be consistently the most reliable in cold weather conditions of all the brands I've used. Well done.

Link | Posted on Dec 23, 2016 at 06:09 UTC as 6th comment
On article DPReview Asks: What was your first camera? (766 comments in total)

My first camera was a Kodak Brownie Starmite. It was a great little unit for a kid. I couldn't afford colour film so it was always 127 B&W film on a spool packing a whopping twelve potential exposures. I spent every cent I could cobble together from whatever odd jobs I could find to buy the film and process the pictures. In retrospect, the best part was probably the expectation as you waited the two or three weeks that it would take for the film to be sent out processed in the "big city" and returned to the local drug store. I must have driven the clerks crazy since I would go in pretty much every day and ask if my photos were back. It was a great camera because that gift from my mum spawned a life long love affair with photography that still endures more than forty years later.

Link | Posted on Nov 12, 2016 at 04:50 UTC as 22nd comment
On photo Sagrada Familia in the Your City - Interior of a monumental building challenge (17 comments in total)

Stunning image!

Link | Posted on Apr 13, 2016 at 21:49 UTC as 1st comment

I have been evaluating Lightroom 4 for the past week. I have tried it along with DxO Optics Pro and Capture One pro in the past, but I keep coming back to ACDSee Pro 6 for its truly beautiful usability, efficiency and feature set. While I feel that Lightroom may have a slight edge in terms of image quality (if you look very closely), I feel it looses in many of the categories you've examined here when compared to ACDSee Pro 6. The only thing that really puzzles me is why, ACDSee Pro 6 is never included in these RAW software comparisons. In my opinion, it really should be. Frankly, I think it is a better match for Lightroom and Capture One than DxO.

Link | Posted on Mar 26, 2013 at 05:32 UTC as 37th comment
On article ACD Systems issues ACDSee Pro 6 and ACDSee 15 (75 comments in total)
In reply to:

Artak Hambarian: I do not know any better viewer that also has very instant editing capability. I admire the possibility to use the mouse wheel at full screen to scroll the pictures, organize folders. The Pro 5 added instant or automatic view of the maps if the pics are geotagged. Which other soft has that? Keen to know. Will upgrade to 6 soon.

I do quite well with my photo workflow without a single piece of Adobe software and that is the way I hope to keep it. ACDSee Pro, and a couple of other editing products give me as much range and capability as I need. I work efficiently and am able to produce high quality results without buying into the dominant graphics ecosystem or their pricing model. Suits me just fine.

Link | Posted on Dec 27, 2012 at 23:01 UTC
On article ACD Systems issues ACDSee Pro 6 and ACDSee 15 (75 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dean Baird: ACD is the company that bought Canvas (from Deneba), then discontinued it on the Mac platform. I would never trust them with anything ever again. I can only presume that they will--on a whim--decide to discontinue a product.

With Canvas X, they wouldn't support it and they wouldn't sell it to anyone who would. They've made enemies of everyone on the Mac OS Canvas-using community.

If you choose to throw in with this company, you've been warned. If you're a Mac user, you're begging for trouble. That's the one thing ACD can be counted on to deliver.

A lot of software companies discontinued Mac software versions back when Apple had around 2% market share and who can blame them. Last time I checked they weren't charities. Now that the Mac is doing much better, I believe many of these same businesses are moving, or have moved, onto the platform again including ACDSee who recently released a Mac version of ACDSee Pro.

Link | Posted on Oct 27, 2012 at 07:11 UTC
On article ACD Systems issues ACDSee Pro 6 and ACDSee 15 (75 comments in total)
In reply to:

english_Wolf: http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1000&message=42606320

Please read, found an important flaw that can lead to total destruction of data. I canceled my pre-order after I found it.

Basically ACDSee demands that you place the 'file delete' confirm at the OS level (recycle bin option) vs leaving it as an option limited to ACDSee image review manipulation.

Before we could select tools-option-file management confirm delete behavior on/off. Now this being set at the OS level. This means that if you accidentally select 'delete' when at the disk level or while opening a file (any program), say good bye to your data until you retrieve it from the recycle bin.

I am an IT consultnt and system administrator and ACDSee is now off my list of recommendation for those I consult for and definitively barred from the network I administer.

Note this information (use recycling option) came from ACDSee tech support.

I've been using ACDSee Pro for years and have a huge library of photos. I've never had a problem with inadvertently deleting photos and I'm not a Network Administrator. So, if I can use it without any worries, it seems odd to think that someone as tech savy as a network admin would be scared off. Frankly, I've tried many of the others (Lightroom, DxO, PhaseOne), and ACDsee still wins for me. It does what it does, and seems to do it quite well - easy peazy, as they say.

Link | Posted on Oct 27, 2012 at 06:51 UTC

I prefer the focussed photo-centric character of Flickr, perhaps because I do most of my socializing face to face or through forums such as this, and use Flickr as a venue specifically to share and discuss the art of photography.

For photo-sharing, Flickr suits me far better than Facebook, where it feels like an add on of secondary importance to the pseudo socializing that defines it (my opinion), but as they say, whatever floats your boat...

Link | Posted on Jul 20, 2012 at 07:19 UTC as 65th comment
On article Ricoh to make 16MP APS-C GXR zoom module (136 comments in total)

The more I look at the GXR, the more I like it. Sometimes it takes people a while to realize that the established way of doing things isn't necessarily the best way - interchangeable lenses vs an interchangeable module for instance. As each new mirrorless camera model finds some fundamental way to disappoint me, I realize that the GXR has it pretty much all covered. The flexibility of the design seems quite good!

I hope Ricoh/Pentax continue to develop this concept. I wonder if the addition of one or two more lens mount units allowing one to conveniently reuse that old Nikon, Canon, Olympus, or Pentax glass might be a consideration? Also, given that no one other than Leica has bothered to consider a larger than APS-C option in the mirrorless market, I can't help but wonder if any such units could go that route...

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2012 at 14:58 UTC as 1st comment

Why don't these camera makers simply provide a tapped cable hole on the shutter button any more - at least as good, if not better, than an electronic cable release in most circumstances. An example of one of those things that wasn't broken but got fixed anyway I guess...

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2012 at 00:52 UTC as 7th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

locke_fc: Looks nice, but overpriced to me. Lens selection sucks, specially since the 18mm is mediocre, from what I've read, and there are no zooms.

Fuji, call me back when the price drops well under $2000 and there's at least one decent option at the wide end.

HowaboutRAW:

Frankly, I don’t care about the NEX7. My comment was about the potential commercial success of the Fuji.

While there seems little doubt that the X-Pro 1 is capable of producing remarkable photographs, for most users the difference between an X-Pro 1 image and those produced by an OMD or NEX will be hardly noticeable. What other advantages does the Fuji offer? An established system? No! Advanced image stabilization? No! A weather sealed body? No! Exceptionally fast frame rate? No! Best in class X-sync? No!

Beyond its image quality potential and innovative sensor, X-Pro 1 is an APS-C camera that makes more feature-rich competitors look like bargains. Consumers may recognize this and simply wait for Olympus, Panasonic, Sony or Samsung, among others, to implement similar sensor design in their offerings. It will happen!

Fuji needs to take advantage of every possibility, including value, if they want to establish the X-Pro system. I hope this clarifies my thoughts.

Link | Posted on Apr 7, 2012 at 20:04 UTC
In reply to:

locke_fc: Looks nice, but overpriced to me. Lens selection sucks, specially since the 18mm is mediocre, from what I've read, and there are no zooms.

Fuji, call me back when the price drops well under $2000 and there's at least one decent option at the wide end.

Good lenses, reasonably priced. The body is another matter. I think Fuji made a strategic error here. As the genesis of a new system, the X-Pro 1 is relying on hype, looks, and Press to carry the day. Its raison d'être shouldn’t be margin but market penetration. Fuji needs to leverage everything it can, including perceived value.

While much of the recipe is correct, the price is a disadvantage compared to the OM-D E-M5 and the NEX7. Potential buyers who find themselves stretched by cost will either opt for one of the others or take it in the ribs but expect performance equal to their sacrifice. Shortcomings, especially compared to the Olympus and Sony, may become contentious and result in disaffected adopters.

Premium pricing is a two edged sword. Fuji may find it cuts the wielder as keenly as the target. If this model was priced competitively, I’d buy one in a heartbeat, but as it is, I’m waiting… Hopefully, price doesn’t prove to be the Achilles heel of a promising system.

Link | Posted on Apr 7, 2012 at 00:30 UTC
In reply to:

Hooplapdx: I didn't see any mention of the slanted top where the controls are. It really does work in pushing your elbow in to a more stable position. It is a very clever feature.

I've only held a pre-production model (at CES) and it seemed unnecessarily large and heavy. I know it is less than an M9, but would people really take it less seriously if it was a bit more compact. For street photography, I'd prefer smaller and a bit lighter.

While some may prefer a smaller or a larger camera, size is only one variable in the search for good ergonomics. I have no doubt that a camera can be made quite small, or even quite large and still offer an exceptionally comfortable feel.

Link | Posted on Apr 6, 2012 at 23:08 UTC

The X-Pro 1 is very close to what I've been waiting for; a digital camera that produces clean almost analogue looking images. It dispenses with the one thing that has always bothered me about digital cameras: the anitaliasing filter. The problem for me is that it is far more expensive than I think is warranted, and by all reports the autofocus is slooowww, something one shouldn't have to contend with in a camera at this price point.

Given the way that one good idea leads to another in our technological world, I have little doubt that Fuji's big innovation in sensor design will be mirrored by similar advances from the other manufacturers in the very near future. With that in mind, "the system" one buys into once again becomes the most important issue. Which system to embrace? Given that Fuji seems unwilling to offer X-Pros at a truly attractive price point, I will likely wait again for a more competitive answer from one of the other makers.

Link | Posted on Apr 6, 2012 at 18:44 UTC as 13th comment
On article Just Posted: Olympus OM-D E-M5 test samples (456 comments in total)
In reply to:

Anfy: IMHO it holds remarkably well against the bigger sensor Sony NEX-5n even at 3200 ISO.

My son purchased the Sony NEX-5 about a year ago. Despite taking good care of it, the contacts inside the battery compartment are showing signs of corrosion and the non-glare coating on the LCD has mostly worn off, leaving quite a mess. Beyond all that, he has experienced consistent problems with dust spots on the sensor despite only owning two lenses. He's now looking at replacing it with the OM-D E-M5.

My experience with Olympus cameras has been nothing short of stellar when it comes to construction quality and longevity. I own a number of lenses and am constantly changing them in the field to suit my needs yet have never had a problem with the sensor accumulating dust. Having a reliable camera the just works is highly underrated. There certainly is more to a camera than the sensor!

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2012 at 03:51 UTC
On article DxO Labs announces Optics Pro 7 with faster performance (166 comments in total)
In reply to:

yukonchris: I downloaded DxO yesterday and ran a whole pile of RAW photos through it today, while watching tutorials and trying to get a sense of how it works. So far, I feel rather mixed about it.

As a long time user of ACDSee Pro, I can't help but compare the two. In terms of positive impressions, DxO does an amazing job of automatically correcting photos for distortions that are typical for a particular camera/lens combination, as long as it is supported (my E-30 and all its lenses are, but my E-330 not so much) This is something that ACDSee Pro doesn't handle at all really so it's a real plus for DxO.

The other positive I noticed with DxO is that it's presets, especially the single image HDR sets and their associated fine adjustments seem to work quite well on my landscape images, facilitating some very nice results that, at least at normal magnifications, seem to offer better results than ACDSee Pro can with its "Lighting" module.

So far, so good... See my reply for the not so good...

The last thing I'd like to add is that ACDSee Pro offers an excellent database facility for cataloguing classifying and ultimately finding your images. I haven't had time to ascertain whether DxO Optics Pro offers similar functionality, but if they do it isn't obvious.

On first blush, Optics Pro feels like an excellent RAW converter that just isn't quite well rounded enough or finished enough for me to commit to. Still, I have thirty more days to play so perhaps my opinion will change...

Link | Posted on Feb 19, 2012 at 06:14 UTC
Total: 44, showing: 1 – 20
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