LuFra72

Joined on Jun 24, 2014

Comments

Total: 27, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

thoth22: Bread and circuses for the masses = pro entertainment/sports.

yawn

Link | Posted on Sep 21, 2015 at 19:53 UTC
In reply to:

Tungsten Nordstein: Interesting subjects. I'm no fan of the processed photo-style. I can imagine how lovely these would have looked taken on 35mm slide film.

I honestly don't understand what's the point on giving an underhanded comment. I simply don't understand why there's a need for people to essentially say "yea nice, but this could have been better if it would have been done in a way I'm thinking would be better." You've already invested quite a bit of your time on something you supposedly don't like.

Link | Posted on Sep 21, 2015 at 04:18 UTC

Laters, Instasize!

Link | Posted on Aug 28, 2015 at 05:15 UTC as 12th comment
On photo Lee in the Expecting challenge (20 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cane: Looks like she's grabbing her you know what and her you know what. If that's what you are going for, very hot picture.

"Unfortunate that our society still cannot deal with the human body and a demure pose without indulging in puerile schoolboy commentary."

Let's take it back further than that! Iin the old days, swapping wives and having sex with both male/female servants was considered 'the norm'. Frescos of sexual positions were typically found in living rooms too. Now that said, how would you take it if someone commented with something like "Beautiful pregnancy shot, and what a sexy view of her inner thigh; I'd love to see what her hand is hiding" - would you consider a comment like that inappropriate?

Also, art is all about perception - you can't tell people how to react to art. For me, this shot's caption is: "Hahaha, what if I try to pull the baby out of here now, in my back yard!?"

Link | Posted on Jul 22, 2015 at 00:13 UTC
On article Canon EOS Rebel T6i Review (310 comments in total)
In reply to:

IvanM: I would argue high DR is almost essential for amateurs or beginners...people that dont want/have the skill to expose properly. But having said that those types of photographers are probably not going to have access to post production tools like LR etc, so does it really matter, like you rightly asked? The flipside is that all Canons come with the 'free' DPP software, and if one has the patience to try it out there are some very good options in there to 'fix' poorly exposed images....but then one would have to shoot RAW, and how many beginners actually do that, or need to do that....thats maybe why Canon entry level cameras sell so well. My cousin just bought a 760D, his first 'serious' camera and his purchase was made because he perceived the Canon 760 to be 'easy to use', he trusted and knew the brand and he thought the Nikon would be too complicated...no mention of DR or noisy sensors....

Thanks Rishi, I didn't realize that the sensors of these other Nikon cameras didn't suffer from the same noise problems as these "budget" Canons. Still, the fact that it (dual iso) improves noise for my camera over what it would do out of the box with the stock firmware is ultimately what's important.

Link | Posted on Jul 7, 2015 at 20:54 UTC
On article Canon EOS Rebel T6i Review (310 comments in total)
In reply to:

IvanM: I would argue high DR is almost essential for amateurs or beginners...people that dont want/have the skill to expose properly. But having said that those types of photographers are probably not going to have access to post production tools like LR etc, so does it really matter, like you rightly asked? The flipside is that all Canons come with the 'free' DPP software, and if one has the patience to try it out there are some very good options in there to 'fix' poorly exposed images....but then one would have to shoot RAW, and how many beginners actually do that, or need to do that....thats maybe why Canon entry level cameras sell so well. My cousin just bought a 760D, his first 'serious' camera and his purchase was made because he perceived the Canon 760 to be 'easy to use', he trusted and knew the brand and he thought the Nikon would be too complicated...no mention of DR or noisy sensors....

Rishi, I said "it's like putting a jet engine on a duck." The $2,000 Nikon D750 is no "duck". Please remember we're talking about an EOS camera here (if you're going to bring up Nikon, please use a comparable model for comparison). Which (comparable model) Nikon gives you 14 stops of DR?

Link | Posted on Jul 7, 2015 at 18:39 UTC
On article Canon EOS Rebel T6i Review (310 comments in total)
In reply to:

IvanM: I would argue high DR is almost essential for amateurs or beginners...people that dont want/have the skill to expose properly. But having said that those types of photographers are probably not going to have access to post production tools like LR etc, so does it really matter, like you rightly asked? The flipside is that all Canons come with the 'free' DPP software, and if one has the patience to try it out there are some very good options in there to 'fix' poorly exposed images....but then one would have to shoot RAW, and how many beginners actually do that, or need to do that....thats maybe why Canon entry level cameras sell so well. My cousin just bought a 760D, his first 'serious' camera and his purchase was made because he perceived the Canon 760 to be 'easy to use', he trusted and knew the brand and he thought the Nikon would be too complicated...no mention of DR or noisy sensors....

...also, I'm not sure if you've implied that shooting RAW allows the same level of post processing capabilities as Dual ISO (it does not). I was shooting RAW on my T3i for over a year before ML/Dual ISO and already had a bit of experience with RAW in post. Dual ISO is like putting a jet engine on a duck. Some Nikon users know this (I've seen a few of them ask for ML in Nikon on the ML forums, but have been politely reminded that it's a Canon project only).

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2015 at 20:00 UTC
On article Canon EOS Rebel T6i Review (310 comments in total)
In reply to:

IvanM: I would argue high DR is almost essential for amateurs or beginners...people that dont want/have the skill to expose properly. But having said that those types of photographers are probably not going to have access to post production tools like LR etc, so does it really matter, like you rightly asked? The flipside is that all Canons come with the 'free' DPP software, and if one has the patience to try it out there are some very good options in there to 'fix' poorly exposed images....but then one would have to shoot RAW, and how many beginners actually do that, or need to do that....thats maybe why Canon entry level cameras sell so well. My cousin just bought a 760D, his first 'serious' camera and his purchase was made because he perceived the Canon 760 to be 'easy to use', he trusted and knew the brand and he thought the Nikon would be too complicated...no mention of DR or noisy sensors....

Not important to me at all, really. I capture moving subjects like I did with my old SLR, by focusing on them and moving my camera along with their movement, and take the shot while I've got them in focus.

"as soon as you press the shutter button the box freezes, so if your subject is still moving, it won't focus on it."

-what happens if you follow the subject with the camera itself after you lock them in? I would think the little square would help the user "track" the subject on the screen (don't know as my camera doesn't do that).

Link | Posted on Jun 26, 2015 at 22:09 UTC
On article Canon EOS Rebel T6i Review (310 comments in total)
In reply to:

IvanM: I would argue high DR is almost essential for amateurs or beginners...people that dont want/have the skill to expose properly. But having said that those types of photographers are probably not going to have access to post production tools like LR etc, so does it really matter, like you rightly asked? The flipside is that all Canons come with the 'free' DPP software, and if one has the patience to try it out there are some very good options in there to 'fix' poorly exposed images....but then one would have to shoot RAW, and how many beginners actually do that, or need to do that....thats maybe why Canon entry level cameras sell so well. My cousin just bought a 760D, his first 'serious' camera and his purchase was made because he perceived the Canon 760 to be 'easy to use', he trusted and knew the brand and he thought the Nikon would be too complicated...no mention of DR or noisy sensors....

Rishi - I don't know what a "typical Rebel user" is. A lot of people buy these entry-level DSLRs and don't take them off Auto, then there are people like me, who start with the Auto modes and eventually progress to shooting in Manual and learn all of the features. ML requires this level of user - it is NOT for those who don't know what RAW is.

Rebels shoot in RAW as well, and starting with the T4i you have live focus tracking (to track the newborn in your example). The only difference between a Canon and a Nikon is you can only install ML on a Canon (which has several focus enhancements as well).

Link | Posted on Jun 26, 2015 at 15:56 UTC
On article Canon EOS Rebel T6i Review (310 comments in total)
In reply to:

IvanM: I would argue high DR is almost essential for amateurs or beginners...people that dont want/have the skill to expose properly. But having said that those types of photographers are probably not going to have access to post production tools like LR etc, so does it really matter, like you rightly asked? The flipside is that all Canons come with the 'free' DPP software, and if one has the patience to try it out there are some very good options in there to 'fix' poorly exposed images....but then one would have to shoot RAW, and how many beginners actually do that, or need to do that....thats maybe why Canon entry level cameras sell so well. My cousin just bought a 760D, his first 'serious' camera and his purchase was made because he perceived the Canon 760 to be 'easy to use', he trusted and knew the brand and he thought the Nikon would be too complicated...no mention of DR or noisy sensors....

BTW, here are some ML Dual ISO examples; tell me which ones look "weird" photoaddict:

https://www.flickr.com/search/?q=dualiso

Link | Posted on Jun 25, 2015 at 22:15 UTC
On article Canon EOS Rebel T6i Review (310 comments in total)
In reply to:

IvanM: I would argue high DR is almost essential for amateurs or beginners...people that dont want/have the skill to expose properly. But having said that those types of photographers are probably not going to have access to post production tools like LR etc, so does it really matter, like you rightly asked? The flipside is that all Canons come with the 'free' DPP software, and if one has the patience to try it out there are some very good options in there to 'fix' poorly exposed images....but then one would have to shoot RAW, and how many beginners actually do that, or need to do that....thats maybe why Canon entry level cameras sell so well. My cousin just bought a 760D, his first 'serious' camera and his purchase was made because he perceived the Canon 760 to be 'easy to use', he trusted and knew the brand and he thought the Nikon would be too complicated...no mention of DR or noisy sensors....

^^BS. I have a T3i and am running the latest nightly without any issues (almost a year now). I know people who run it on their older T2i's as well. With regards to your claim that it damages sensors - in the last two/three years that ML has been developing Dual ISO, there have been ZERO reports from anyone in the ML forums saying it damaged their sensor. Stop spreading BS.

Link | Posted on Jun 25, 2015 at 19:23 UTC
On article Canon EOS Rebel T6i Review (310 comments in total)
In reply to:

IvanM: I would argue high DR is almost essential for amateurs or beginners...people that dont want/have the skill to expose properly. But having said that those types of photographers are probably not going to have access to post production tools like LR etc, so does it really matter, like you rightly asked? The flipside is that all Canons come with the 'free' DPP software, and if one has the patience to try it out there are some very good options in there to 'fix' poorly exposed images....but then one would have to shoot RAW, and how many beginners actually do that, or need to do that....thats maybe why Canon entry level cameras sell so well. My cousin just bought a 760D, his first 'serious' camera and his purchase was made because he perceived the Canon 760 to be 'easy to use', he trusted and knew the brand and he thought the Nikon would be too complicated...no mention of DR or noisy sensors....

"If I do the same with Canon, I see ugly color noise with no details."

LOL! Two words for you (which you can't know about if you shoot with Nikon): Dual ISO

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2015 at 20:18 UTC
On article Canon EOS Rebel T6i Review (310 comments in total)

Cool! Can't wait for the price to drop on the T5i so I can get a used one and put Magic Lantern on it (I love my T3i with it, but now I want a touch screen).

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2015 at 16:17 UTC as 94th comment
In reply to:

Nimbifer: yes DSLRs are quickly becoming a niche product. And the niche will be much smaller than most would believe. DSLR users will be soon be as small a minority as medium format camera users or as vinyl LP users today.

It does matter a lot, whether a digital camera has unnecessary mechanically moving parts in the light path or not. Mirrorless will truly kick mnirrorslappers butt, as soon as global electronic shutter reaches prime time and both mirror and mech shutter are finally history.

As far as styling and body size goes, this is just an artefact of ultra-conservative old people in japanese camera makers top management teams. Plus a few old farts on the user side. But again, in reality those are about as many as vinyl LP listeners and medium format photogs today.

@String -

Since when? Since 2006. It's not a "maybe" either - look it up.

Link | Posted on Jun 19, 2015 at 21:15 UTC
In reply to:

LuFra72: Last year, I installed ML on my T3i and it's almost like a brand new camera. So, no new camera in the horizon for me. I recently bought a wide angle and upgraded my kit lens so I'm just interested in composing and taking better shots (I've seen some amazing pictures taken by much more skilled photographers using the same camera I own, so that's an inspiration to put the gear lust down and get better with what I've already got instead). Sorry, I know this isn't what a manufacturer would like a typical consumer to feel, but I'm more interested in capturing better pictures at the end of the day.

EDIT: That last picture isn't very good, to be honest. I obviously can't tell if it was taken with a mirrorless camera or not, but it definitely didn't have a lens hood! (flare in the image)

Not just the sides, you can prevent flares from shots where the sun is overhead as well, here's an even more extreme example than the shot above, with more flare, sun almost directly overhead and how it's completely gone by using a lens hood (although I do agree that sometimes you simply can't avoid it):

http://www.adorama.com/catalog.tpl?op=article_012703

EDIT: As far as "wouldn't change the final image" I have to disagree. Even if you get some degree of flare from the sun being in the horizon like that, my experience is that images improve with a lens hood by reducing haze, and you can see in the image in this article that the picture is saturated quite a bit. With a lens hood, you're likely to get a shot that isn't so saturated.

Link | Posted on Jun 19, 2015 at 18:16 UTC
In reply to:

Nimbifer: yes DSLRs are quickly becoming a niche product. And the niche will be much smaller than most would believe. DSLR users will be soon be as small a minority as medium format camera users or as vinyl LP users today.

It does matter a lot, whether a digital camera has unnecessary mechanically moving parts in the light path or not. Mirrorless will truly kick mnirrorslappers butt, as soon as global electronic shutter reaches prime time and both mirror and mech shutter are finally history.

As far as styling and body size goes, this is just an artefact of ultra-conservative old people in japanese camera makers top management teams. Plus a few old farts on the user side. But again, in reality those are about as many as vinyl LP listeners and medium format photogs today.

Your vinyl LP analogy is a bit off, since vinyl sales continue to climb!

Link | Posted on Jun 19, 2015 at 17:10 UTC

Last year, I installed ML on my T3i and it's almost like a brand new camera. So, no new camera in the horizon for me. I recently bought a wide angle and upgraded my kit lens so I'm just interested in composing and taking better shots (I've seen some amazing pictures taken by much more skilled photographers using the same camera I own, so that's an inspiration to put the gear lust down and get better with what I've already got instead). Sorry, I know this isn't what a manufacturer would like a typical consumer to feel, but I'm more interested in capturing better pictures at the end of the day.

EDIT: That last picture isn't very good, to be honest. I obviously can't tell if it was taken with a mirrorless camera or not, but it definitely didn't have a lens hood! (flare in the image)

Link | Posted on Jun 19, 2015 at 16:26 UTC as 162nd comment | 2 replies
On article Astropad turns iPad into drawing tablet for Mac (117 comments in total)

No thanks! I'm still happy with my 1st gen Lenovo ThinkPad tablet running SketchBook Pro (the Lenovo stylus has pressure sensitivity).

Link | Posted on Feb 18, 2015 at 21:03 UTC as 22nd comment | 1 reply
Total: 27, showing: 1 – 20
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