Donthuis

Donthuis

Lives in Netherlands near The Hague, Netherlands
Works as a mgt consultant ICT (retired)
Joined on Aug 12, 2010

Comments

Total: 23, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Arek Halusko: Do people actually upload their photos to Flickr and not keep local copies?

Never in a lifetime, Flickr was once an extra to multiple local backups in the years when hosting or cloud services were still in their infancy. And it was early with facilities for compiling albums. Nowadays, with Google foto's keeping any picture from your smartphone or Tablet for free and Microsoft jumping the bandwagon with Windows 10, the world is changed. Album facilities are included. If Flickr folds I will regret this because of its past, at present I've no longer any urgent use for it, so no subscription from my side. BTW even with picture processing I do not want any Cloudbased solution on subscription basis, so exit Adobe for new functions after LR6 went to Creative cloud...

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2019 at 09:28 UTC

As storage goes, Google drive lets you store pictures for free if they are in high resolution. Somehow the strategic paths between Yahoo and present ownership on this storage issue crossed! Since I never did an upload to Flickr on a picture I did not store locally (once on the PC, with a tripled backup scheme) I'll just let Flickr delete half of my earlier pictures. They may even delete all but 1000 left is more than enough for me

Link | Posted on Feb 12, 2019 at 12:32 UTC as 6th comment
On article Lenovo Moto G5 Plus camera first impressions review (67 comments in total)

Lenovo just indicated 3 Gb RAM will be the standard offering in the Benelux. Maybe other markets will follow. I'm interested in the price difference 32 versus 64G storage, because the Android 6 and higher function to let the SD card work seemlessly as system memory is blocked my most manufacturers. On purpose of course, everybody is following Apple's pricing strategy on system memory, Android features or not.

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2017 at 09:24 UTC as 17th comment
On article DPReview Asks: What was your first camera? (758 comments in total)
In reply to:

rui oliveira: My first one was a TOPCON (don't remenber reference type)
Canon EF
Canon AE-1
Nikon F 601
Nikon FM1n
Nikon FE2
Mamya 645s
Nikon F70
Nikon F80
Nikon F100
Nikon D70
Nikon D300
Nikon D600 and Fuji X-M1

Topcon camera's carried the (restrictive) Exakta lens mount...

Link | Posted on Nov 6, 2016 at 12:32 UTC
On article DPReview Asks: What was your first camera? (758 comments in total)

The very first was a "boy box" camera for roll film aimed at kids (1952 I believe)
The first real camera was a SLR, the Exa IIb, which I soon traded in with extra payment for the traditional Exakta IIb with its removable prism (around 1965), to which I joined a Konica C35 for on my business travels abroad, starting in 1974. Shorty after came my first SLR with inbuil exposure control the Canon EF in 1975. Looking back in time, the Exakta period was the most active one, since all B&W picture processing was included by me, lots of darkroom usage included. As soon I started photographing with the versatile Canon I changed to transparencies, of which I still have over 3000 mounted in their frames and stored in the dark. With a fine Kodak Caroussel projector transparencies really came to life. After changing to color negatives + prints elsewhere some of this magic is gone. In my digital present Lightroom only partially restores it and its digital slideshow on my LCD TV is just OK to watch

Link | Posted on Nov 5, 2016 at 14:51 UTC as 185th comment

It is quite typical of a mature market, some would even say one in decline. Product differentiation, looking for market segments that still hold profits and compensating loss in turnover by cost-cutting measures. But let's not forget the P&S market is almost gone and even the upmarket camera's face ever stronger competition from everbetter smartphones, Sony included. Consumers use the camera they have with them!
I used to work in the Telecom industry which commoditized fast and lost high margins quickly, IT/PC industry experiences the same (Sony abandoned its Vaio laptop & may even drop their TV-line of business)
I do hope that the large, most innovative camerabuilders (Canon, Fuji, Nikon and Sony) will survive thanks to their innovation and workmanship, but I wouild never gamble on anyone's survival in the long run. 4K is a natural evolution, but not a gamechanger, nor will even higher sensor resolutions Drones come with 4K as a given nowadays..

Link | Posted on Nov 2, 2015 at 15:51 UTC as 3rd comment | 3 replies
On article Hands-on with Canon's 'not-coming-to-USA' EOS M3 (544 comments in total)

I once had a look at the Powershot Pro 1 ages ago. It did not focus well and was never really improved upon (just a FW update nothing really helping).
Then the EOS-M raised my interest, again a focus failing product, only improved upon in Asia. IMO explicitlly far away from DSLR enthousiasts elsewhere
Now this M3 is another halfway product to suggest real competition to their own line of DSLR, but probably restricted in performance for commercial reasons.
Panasonic did the same in partially "castrating" the GH4 electronics inside the LX100 to eliminate internal competition. In the mean time I just bought the Canon Powershot G7X, so this other Canon product is too late for me anyway.

Link | Posted on Feb 7, 2015 at 17:18 UTC as 85th comment
On article High-end pocketable compacts roundup (2013) (261 comments in total)
In reply to:

Tripodasaurus: The most convenient camera for a shirt pocket is a smartphone! I have the Nokia Lumina 1020. 34Mpx so can digitally zoom in if required. Picture detail quality can be breathtaking. Colour rendition is lovely too. It's slim with touch screen controls.
Includes manual control options for Flash, White Balance, ISO, Shutter Speed, Exposure Compensation (brightness).
Not to mention text messaging, internet (free at home and cafe WiFi hot spots etc) maps, GPS, sat nav. and apps galore if you want. Only £267 on Amazon UK today.

So a pocketable camera has to offer a much better camera shooting experience and or better image quality than a smartphone to justify carrying it in addition to the phone most people carry with them anyway.
For more serious photography with viewfinders and larger controls etc. I'd choose a larger camera anyway.
I'm my humble opinion the only way the pocketable cameras can survive is to take a leaf out of smart phones' book and include a phone circuit.

Welcome to the club. My MOTO G LTE is by far inferior to your excellent NOKIA, but I still use it much more often than I expected. My present ISXUS 300HS is just as small, but lets me down in low light situations on filming when zooming in, so I will buy another more capable one. Either just as small (Sony RX100III or CANON G7X), or by contrast to my phone slightly larger like the LX100, knowing that I will NOT carry it along very often. Lots of other people may wait for smartphone camera's to come better and better instead. Even people with SLR's I see using smartphones more and more nowadays

Link | Posted on Dec 2, 2014 at 11:41 UTC
On article High-end pocketable compacts roundup (2013) (261 comments in total)
In reply to:

Donthuis: I find more and more that while taking your smartphone with you is a given, taking a camera along with you is far from being an automatic action. So as a longtime amateur photographer I find me taking lots of shots with my MOTO G, even when realising that this model is a fine model as processing and HD-screen go, but not for taking pictures in low light. But it's always in the pocket and this is what counts. I wonder how fast and to what extend smartphones will drive consumertype digital camera's out. Advanced smaller ones my be the last ones to go? SLR is a different story, but I see them lying unused in family circles with the -in this case expensive- smartphone in action for pictures and video's

RAW is superior to JPEG, but that is not what I'm debating. It is that smartphones are like wristwatches, you always carry them with you. And smartphone software whether Apple or Android come with lots of camera apps, photo improvement included. Since the phone is often or even constantly connected to the internet all kind of cloud storage and processing functions are at your fingertips. So next to carrying another device, the software is also much cheaper and easier to use. Camera 360 is one of the most capable camera app (but also featurerich, so more complicated to use than Instagram or Picasa). What smartphones still miss still zoomlenses, but NOKIA used to compensate this by digital zooming on high Mpx sensors. Microsoft is killing this development now they absorbed them to promote Windows phone sale

Link | Posted on Dec 2, 2014 at 11:00 UTC
On article High-end pocketable compacts roundup (2013) (261 comments in total)
In reply to:

Donthuis: I find more and more that while taking your smartphone with you is a given, taking a camera along with you is far from being an automatic action. So as a longtime amateur photographer I find me taking lots of shots with my MOTO G, even when realising that this model is a fine model as processing and HD-screen go, but not for taking pictures in low light. But it's always in the pocket and this is what counts. I wonder how fast and to what extend smartphones will drive consumertype digital camera's out. Advanced smaller ones my be the last ones to go? SLR is a different story, but I see them lying unused in family circles with the -in this case expensive- smartphone in action for pictures and video's

Yes you are completely right on the JPEG issue, but most camera's only provide HDR-functions on the JPEG setting, while smartphones offer HDR as included standard in the camera app. Another one: I always improve my normal HQ pictures in Adobe Lightroom, a capable but expensive software package. Pictures taken via smartphones can be improved automatically by Google, adapted by myself in Instagram or Camera 360 app etc.. all for free or almost nothing. I still will buy my next advanced small camera, but maybe it is the last one for me. Carryng around 3 kilograms of SLR + lenses like I did years ago is gone forever for me as modern consumer..

Link | Posted on Dec 1, 2014 at 16:20 UTC
On article High-end pocketable compacts roundup (2013) (261 comments in total)

To add to earlier post: my shirt pocket used to be home to my IXUS 300HS, a small camera looking like a smartphone. Now I often carry my smartphone there. So even physically, smartphones are driving some camera's out. Of course smartphones tend to grow from 4"to 5" and larger screen models, which only just fit in trouser pockets, so maybe this trend will not continue?

Link | Posted on Dec 1, 2014 at 16:13 UTC as 20th comment
On article High-end pocketable compacts roundup (2013) (261 comments in total)

I find more and more that while taking your smartphone with you is a given, taking a camera along with you is far from being an automatic action. So as a longtime amateur photographer I find me taking lots of shots with my MOTO G, even when realising that this model is a fine model as processing and HD-screen go, but not for taking pictures in low light. But it's always in the pocket and this is what counts. I wonder how fast and to what extend smartphones will drive consumertype digital camera's out. Advanced smaller ones my be the last ones to go? SLR is a different story, but I see them lying unused in family circles with the -in this case expensive- smartphone in action for pictures and video's

Link | Posted on Dec 1, 2014 at 11:52 UTC as 21st comment | 5 replies
On article Week in review: Photokina is in the air... (63 comments in total)

I'm surprised that Panasonic not only missed its 16th of july deadline for the LX8 presentation, but also the "end of august" one. Now with Photokina approaching still no news on this competitor to Sony's R100 MKIII. Not watertight as promised, or is the 4k video-function not working as intended? Even design specs are missing now.
I wonder what the outcome will be, Fuji's X30 was presented in time

Link | Posted on Sep 7, 2014 at 17:50 UTC as 16th comment | 1 reply
On photo DSC00028 in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (1 comment in total)

Nice colours, I would've expected higher saturation from Sony, especially in red. PS The blue in the white eyes suggests a mid-day picture time

Link | Posted on Oct 14, 2012 at 12:20 UTC as 1st comment
On a photo in the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX1 Preview Samples sample gallery (1 comment in total)

Nice colours, I would've expected higher saturation from Sony, especially in red. PS The blue in the white eyes suggests a mid-day picture time

Link | Posted on Oct 14, 2012 at 12:20 UTC as 1st comment
On photo DSC00024 in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (4 comments in total)

Reminds me of Fuji-type colours and neutral 35mm films from way back...

Link | Posted on Oct 14, 2012 at 12:17 UTC as 1st comment
On a photo in the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX1 Preview Samples sample gallery (4 comments in total)

Reminds me of Fuji-type colours and neutral 35mm films from way back...

Link | Posted on Oct 14, 2012 at 12:17 UTC as 1st comment
On photo Sony29_16-50_DSC086 in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (5 comments in total)

Strange that almost all pictures are low-light situations. Now CA can not be evaluated, while NR comes up much stronger, in line wth higher ISO-values. Maybe this is a consequence of shooting in october?! Let's await more pics.

Link | Posted on Oct 14, 2012 at 12:13 UTC as 1st comment
On a photo in the Sony Alpha NEX-6 Preview Samples sample gallery (5 comments in total)

Strange that almost all pictures are low-light situations. Now CA can not be evaluated, while NR comes up much stronger, in line wth higher ISO-values. Maybe this is a consequence of shooting in october?! Let's await more pics.

Link | Posted on Oct 14, 2012 at 12:13 UTC as 1st comment
On article Lightroom 4 Review (460 comments in total)

Excellent review as always. Of course, going back to exposure and contrast brings LR closer to the old darkroom practice of fiddling with exposure and paper contrast, but we've finally learned to learn the other, LR1 & 3 way of working. It is almost as if another school of thought won the battle inside Adobe! Strange that saturation also seems to take a stronger role, I hardly use it in LR1.4 and 3.5, preferring "livening colors up" instead. Since I will continue with XP at least for another year, maybe even two, I will see what happens before moving over and will use my expensive LR books in the mean time. Windows 7 is only interesting for heavy applications like these and my MAGIX Video de Luxe versions in the 64 bit version, with its inbuilt support of higher capacity in RAM-memory. RAM puts the limits in image processing and video coding! But to end positively: LR price is finally brought down to OK.

Link | Posted on Mar 12, 2012 at 16:44 UTC as 49th comment
Total: 23, showing: 1 – 20
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