Jeff Peterman

Jeff Peterman

Lives in United States USA, MD, United States
Joined on Jul 4, 2002

Comments

Total: 160, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Artem Holstov: What is this lens equivlent to in FF terms then?

That can't be it. A 135mm lens has the equivalent focal length, allowing for crop, of 135mm on a full frame body. If the lens elements are big enough for it to also work with sensors larger than full frame, then its equivalent focal length on the larger format sensor will be less than 135mm - if the elements are not large enough, to avoid vignetting the image will have to be cropped closer to what would be seen on a full frame. If used on a smaller sensor, the reduction in capture area will mean "cropping" such that an image viewed at the same final size as one from the full frame will appear to have been taken with a longer lens.

Having said that. most of the posts in this discussion do not make much sense.

Link | Posted on Nov 15, 2017 at 22:30 UTC
In reply to:

Artem Holstov: What is this lens equivlent to in FF terms then?

This discussion implies that the image is cropped even on full frame. Is that true? And if it is cropped, it would act as if LONGER than 135mm, not shorter, so I am confused by this discussion. Anyone wish to clarify?

Link | Posted on Nov 15, 2017 at 21:47 UTC
In reply to:

Artem Holstov: What is this lens equivlent to in FF terms then?

Why would it be anything other than 135mm?

Link | Posted on Nov 15, 2017 at 21:09 UTC

Let's hope it isn't windy, especially when the legs are extended to 41 inches!

Link | Posted on Nov 9, 2017 at 16:38 UTC as 38th comment

So, in reality, what is the difference between a photo score of 98, 99, 100, or 101. Probably nothing anyone will notice.

Link | Posted on Nov 7, 2017 at 16:53 UTC as 63rd comment | 1 reply
On article Meet the Canon PowerShot G1 X III (327 comments in total)

It looked great. Until I saw that the lens was F2.8-5.6. It probably closes down pretty quickly so that the f2.8 is only at the wide end too.

Link | Posted on Oct 16, 2017 at 23:41 UTC as 99th comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

noisephotographer: I think it is a very bad decision that they haven't implemented a dual camera. Maybe too expensive for them? 26 or 27mm is not good for portraits and moreover digital zoom won't compete with Apple's and Samsung's dual camera zoom.

Ah, OK. Never mind.

Link | Posted on Oct 5, 2017 at 11:53 UTC
In reply to:

noisephotographer: I think it is a very bad decision that they haven't implemented a dual camera. Maybe too expensive for them? 26 or 27mm is not good for portraits and moreover digital zoom won't compete with Apple's and Samsung's dual camera zoom.

From what has come out so far, it looks like dual camera configurations require a large phone (such as the Note 8 and the larger iPhone 8 version), which means ultimately make two models of phones: smaller for most people (single camera) and larger for those who can tolerate the size (dual camera).

Maybe Google didn't want to deal with two phones.

Link | Posted on Oct 4, 2017 at 20:02 UTC
In reply to:

ric h: Your opinion...what is the "lowest" compact camera that still beats these phones in image quality? In other words, you would rather carry this camera than those phones to take pics. "Lowest" here means, the point in which they haven't surpassed that particular camera.

The best camera is the one you have with you. If you know you will take real photos, any good P&S will probably be better (and cost a lot less than either phone). On the other hand, I have several DLSRs and typically carry a Canon S110 in my work bag, and yet most of the photos I've taken over the last year (except at events where photography was important) were with my Note 5 - where I often wished for optical zoom, like I now have with my Note 8.

Link | Posted on Oct 4, 2017 at 16:35 UTC
In reply to:

Photography Matters: My takeaway: For action and wildlife, I want the Android. For portrait and landscape, give me the Apple. And if video matters to you, go with Apple.

"For portrait and landscape, give me the Apple. "

Why? On the wide side they are close, and both have false DOF for portraits, with the Samsung giving you control over the amount of false DOF.

Link | Posted on Oct 4, 2017 at 01:25 UTC

I've just started playing with mine and so far I'm impressed (for a smartphone).

Link | Posted on Oct 4, 2017 at 01:22 UTC as 43rd comment
In reply to:

Och Elo: I ditched sub-1 inch sensor compacts about 3-4 years ago. Started using 1-inch sensor compacts (RX100 to start, last one being LX10), but I've fully embraced smartphones for casual photography in the last couple of months and recently sold the LX10. Even with my "older" iPhone 6s, I still get good enough shots for just casual shooting. For me I wanted the dedicated compact camera to just take with me all the time, but I realized it was still a superfluous gadget I wasn't carrying around as much as I thought. But the phone I always had with me. So the compact camera was increasingly occupying a weird grey area and not getting much use. For more dedicated photography outings, I was taking my Fuji cameras. A dedicated camera (esp 1 inch sensor) has advantages, notably for me in low light and ability to zoom, but I realized for casual snaps those things just weren't that important. YMMV.

Many P&S models gave up on viewfinders years ago (unfortunately) - my Canon S110 lacks one. Using the volume controls to trigger the photo, rather than the button on the screen, makes it a lot easier to take a photo with a phone - an option with many phones.

I found I was never really happy using even a decent P&S for real photos - the sensor size just wasn't good enough, so if a photo really matters I'll take a DSLR or an equivalent mirrorless camera. For the rest of the time, the camera on a high end phone can be good enough.

I'm looking forward to getting my Note 8 next week, with a true optical zoom and optical IS, after which I'll probably try to find a new home for my S110.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2017 at 20:21 UTC
In reply to:

Och Elo: I ditched sub-1 inch sensor compacts about 3-4 years ago. Started using 1-inch sensor compacts (RX100 to start, last one being LX10), but I've fully embraced smartphones for casual photography in the last couple of months and recently sold the LX10. Even with my "older" iPhone 6s, I still get good enough shots for just casual shooting. For me I wanted the dedicated compact camera to just take with me all the time, but I realized it was still a superfluous gadget I wasn't carrying around as much as I thought. But the phone I always had with me. So the compact camera was increasingly occupying a weird grey area and not getting much use. For more dedicated photography outings, I was taking my Fuji cameras. A dedicated camera (esp 1 inch sensor) has advantages, notably for me in low light and ability to zoom, but I realized for casual snaps those things just weren't that important. YMMV.

I bought a Canon S110 as my go-anywhere camera, but I must admit that I've been using it very little since getting my Note 5. The main thing I miss is the zoom, but the new Note 8 will deal with that.

I expect to use the Note 8 camera a lot, pulling out my travel SLR (an SL1) when I need something better and leaving the S110 at home.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2017 at 19:40 UTC

The real competitor for the iPhone 8 is the Note 8, and it is a shame that this isn't on the list yet. Especially because my Note 8 arrives next week.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2017 at 19:36 UTC as 112th comment | 2 replies
On article Canon EOS Rebel SL2 / EOS 200D Review (563 comments in total)

I love my SL1, bought specifically to use as a travel body. I can put the body in one pocket and a lens in another, and carry this combinations where my 7D or 6D are just not practical. I've taken the SL1 all over the world this way - on trips where photography was secondary and size/weight where critical.

The SL2 adds some nice features, but in a larger size. Not by much, but I need to see if the body will still fit in a coat pocket - and wait for the price to drop a little more.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2017 at 21:57 UTC as 76th comment
In reply to:

Najinsky: Good luck Apple.

This is a brave move and one many photographers will eventually thank you for when all the flack has died down (and boy will there be flack, lol).

I'm really looking forward to saying goodbye to 8 bit color and hello to higher quality 10bit color. I just hope camera makers are fast to realize this and the many other benefits it brings and get on board sooner rather than later.

That all depends on the licensing fee charged by Apple. Most other companies will be reluctant to use the new format if they have to pay a fee to integrate it into their hardware/software.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2017 at 13:32 UTC
In reply to:

Jeff Peterman: Sounds a lot like they are trying to catch up with the 8 series from Samsung - the X looks a lot like the Note 8 (including the dual cameras, optical image stabilization, and one with optical zoom, but without the Stylus).

My Note 8 is due in 10 days ... (I'll keep a fire extinguisher nearby for the first few days).

Link | Posted on Sep 13, 2017 at 00:40 UTC

Sounds a lot like they are trying to catch up with the 8 series from Samsung - the X looks a lot like the Note 8 (including the dual cameras, optical image stabilization, and one with optical zoom, but without the Stylus).

Link | Posted on Sep 12, 2017 at 23:46 UTC as 128th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Jeff Peterman: What about for 6D users? Many of us with the older model who don't shoot video are struggling to determine if the upgrade is worth it.

Unfortunately, none of these responses helps. Yes, the MKII has a relative limited spread of good focus points, but the I only use the center one original so the limited spread is still a big improvement. Low ISO DR is not critical to me, but high ISO is and I haven't seen good comparisons of real-world use of the 6D and 6D II in low light. The improvements in AF spots could be enough to justify the upgrade - if the high ISO is at least as good as on the original.

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2017 at 14:56 UTC

What about for 6D users? Many of us with the older model who don't shoot video are struggling to determine if the upgrade is worth it.

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2017 at 04:30 UTC as 43rd comment | 8 replies
Total: 160, showing: 1 – 20
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