fortwodriver

Lives in Canada Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Works as a Network Service Operations
Joined on Dec 29, 2007
About me:

Wow, I haven't heard the term 'plan' since the Unix days!
Anyway, I've got a modest kit - a Canon 7d, 17-40L, 10-20 EF-S, Sigma 30mm 1.4, 100-300 (the cheap one without IS), 580EXII, and some gadgets like flash bracket, remote cords and such. I've been lurking on here for years. So I guess you could say that my 'plan' is to contribute more to the discussions here.

I'm always looking to learn...

Comments

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In reply to:

PKDanny: 35 mm Edit

Leica I, 1925

Argus C3, 1939

See also: History of 135 film
A number of manufacturers started to use 35mm film for still photography between 1905 and 1913. The first 35mm cameras available to the public, and reaching significant numbers in sales were the Tourist Multiple, in 1913, and the Simplex, in 1914.[citation needed]

Oskar Barnack, who was in charge of research and development at Leitz, decided to investigate using 35 mm cine film for still cameras while attempting to build a compact camera capable of making high-quality enlargements. He built his prototype 35 mm camera (Ur-Leica) around 1913, though further development was delayed for several years by World War I. It wasn't until after World War I that Leica commercialized their first 35mm Cameras. Leitz test-marketed the design between 1923 and 1924, receiving enough positive feedback that the camera was put into production as the Leica I (for Leitz camera) in 1925. The Leica's immediate popularity spawned a number of competitors, most notably the Contax (introduced in 1932), and cemented the position of 35 mm as the format of choice for high-end compact cameras.

Kodak got into the market with the Retina I in 1934, which introduced the 135 cartridge used in all modern 35 mm cameras. Although the Retina was comparatively inexpensive, 35 mm cameras were still out of reach for most people and rollfilm remained the format of choice for mass-market cameras. This changed in 1936 with the introduction of the inexpensive Argus A and to an even greater extent in 1939 with the arrival of the immensely popular Argus C3. Although the cheapest cameras still used rollfilm, 35 mm film had come to dominate the market by the time the C3 was discontinued in 1966.

The fledgling Japanese camera industry began to take off in 1936 with the Canon 35 mm rangefinder, an improved version of the 1933 Kwanon prototype. Japanese cameras would begin to become popular in the West after Korean War veterans and soldiers stationed in Japan brought them back to the United States and elsewhere.

TLRs and SLRs Edit
See also: History of the single-lens reflex camera

A historic camera: the Contax S of 1949 — the first pentaprism SLR

Asahiflex IIb, 1954

Nikon F of 1959 — the first Japanese system camera
The first practical reflex camera was the Franke & Heidecke Rolleiflex medium format TLR of 1928. Though both single- and twin-lens reflex cameras had been available for decades, they were too bulky to achieve much popularity. The Rolleiflex, however, was sufficiently compact to achieve widespread popularity and the medium-format TLR design became popular for both high- and low-end cameras.

A similar revolution in SLR design began in 1933 with the introduction of the Ihagee Exakta, a compact SLR which used 127 rollfilm. This was followed three years later by the first Western SLR to use 135 film, the Kine Exakta (World's first true 35mm SLR was Soviet "Sport" camera, marketed several months before Kine Exakta, though "Sport" used its own film cartridge). The 35mm SLR design gained immediate popularity and there was an explosion of new models and innovative features after World War II. There were also a few 35mm TLRs, the best-known of which was the Contaflex of 1935, but for the most part these met with little success.

The first major post-war SLR innovation was the eye-level viewfinder, which first appeared on the Hungarian Duflex in 1947 and was refined in 1948 with the Contax S, the first camera to use a pentaprism. Prior to this, all SLRs were equipped with waist-level focusing screens. The Duflex was also the first SLR with an instant-return mirror, which prevented the viewfinder from being blacked out after each exposure. This same time period also saw the introduction of the Hasselblad 1600F, which set the standard for medium format SLRs for decades.

In 1952 the Asahi Optical Company (which later became well known for its Pentax cameras) introduced the first Japanese SLR using 135 film, the Asahiflex. Several other Japanese camera makers also entered the SLR market in the 1950s, including Canon, Yashica, and Nikon. Nikon's entry, the Nikon F, had a full line of interchangeable components and accessories and is generally regarded as the first Japanese system camera. It was the F, along with the earlier S series of rangefinder cameras, that helped establish Nikon's reputation as a maker of professional-quality equipment

You may also wish to read up on the first 35mm cameras. The Ur-Leica wasn't actually the first. There were a few, from other countries, and one in particular, which you can look up, was actually mass marketed in 1913. Look up the "Tourist Multiple", which even used the "Leica" frame size of 24x36.

Leitz was a very conservative company, you really think they'd hedge a bet on inventing anything like that? They waited for others to get 35mm photography started.

Link | Posted on Nov 13, 2016 at 00:22 UTC
In reply to:

PKDanny: 35 mm Edit

Leica I, 1925

Argus C3, 1939

See also: History of 135 film
A number of manufacturers started to use 35mm film for still photography between 1905 and 1913. The first 35mm cameras available to the public, and reaching significant numbers in sales were the Tourist Multiple, in 1913, and the Simplex, in 1914.[citation needed]

Oskar Barnack, who was in charge of research and development at Leitz, decided to investigate using 35 mm cine film for still cameras while attempting to build a compact camera capable of making high-quality enlargements. He built his prototype 35 mm camera (Ur-Leica) around 1913, though further development was delayed for several years by World War I. It wasn't until after World War I that Leica commercialized their first 35mm Cameras. Leitz test-marketed the design between 1923 and 1924, receiving enough positive feedback that the camera was put into production as the Leica I (for Leitz camera) in 1925. The Leica's immediate popularity spawned a number of competitors, most notably the Contax (introduced in 1932), and cemented the position of 35 mm as the format of choice for high-end compact cameras.

Kodak got into the market with the Retina I in 1934, which introduced the 135 cartridge used in all modern 35 mm cameras. Although the Retina was comparatively inexpensive, 35 mm cameras were still out of reach for most people and rollfilm remained the format of choice for mass-market cameras. This changed in 1936 with the introduction of the inexpensive Argus A and to an even greater extent in 1939 with the arrival of the immensely popular Argus C3. Although the cheapest cameras still used rollfilm, 35 mm film had come to dominate the market by the time the C3 was discontinued in 1966.

The fledgling Japanese camera industry began to take off in 1936 with the Canon 35 mm rangefinder, an improved version of the 1933 Kwanon prototype. Japanese cameras would begin to become popular in the West after Korean War veterans and soldiers stationed in Japan brought them back to the United States and elsewhere.

TLRs and SLRs Edit
See also: History of the single-lens reflex camera

A historic camera: the Contax S of 1949 — the first pentaprism SLR

Asahiflex IIb, 1954

Nikon F of 1959 — the first Japanese system camera
The first practical reflex camera was the Franke & Heidecke Rolleiflex medium format TLR of 1928. Though both single- and twin-lens reflex cameras had been available for decades, they were too bulky to achieve much popularity. The Rolleiflex, however, was sufficiently compact to achieve widespread popularity and the medium-format TLR design became popular for both high- and low-end cameras.

A similar revolution in SLR design began in 1933 with the introduction of the Ihagee Exakta, a compact SLR which used 127 rollfilm. This was followed three years later by the first Western SLR to use 135 film, the Kine Exakta (World's first true 35mm SLR was Soviet "Sport" camera, marketed several months before Kine Exakta, though "Sport" used its own film cartridge). The 35mm SLR design gained immediate popularity and there was an explosion of new models and innovative features after World War II. There were also a few 35mm TLRs, the best-known of which was the Contaflex of 1935, but for the most part these met with little success.

The first major post-war SLR innovation was the eye-level viewfinder, which first appeared on the Hungarian Duflex in 1947 and was refined in 1948 with the Contax S, the first camera to use a pentaprism. Prior to this, all SLRs were equipped with waist-level focusing screens. The Duflex was also the first SLR with an instant-return mirror, which prevented the viewfinder from being blacked out after each exposure. This same time period also saw the introduction of the Hasselblad 1600F, which set the standard for medium format SLRs for decades.

In 1952 the Asahi Optical Company (which later became well known for its Pentax cameras) introduced the first Japanese SLR using 135 film, the Asahiflex. Several other Japanese camera makers also entered the SLR market in the 1950s, including Canon, Yashica, and Nikon. Nikon's entry, the Nikon F, had a full line of interchangeable components and accessories and is generally regarded as the first Japanese system camera. It was the F, along with the earlier S series of rangefinder cameras, that helped establish Nikon's reputation as a maker of professional-quality equipment

Watch your language. Leitz didn't have their own 50mm. They copied the Zeiss Planar. The Planar was introduced in 1933. Only after Leitz copied that lens did they gain any significant sales, and they did so by selling their cameras and lenses for LESS than Zeiss did. The Ur-Leica doesn't really count because a) it wasn't mass produced, and b) it was prone to failure, and c) it didn't even have most of the modern Leica design elements that started with the III series.

In 1936, Leitz FINALLY designed their own 50mm lens that was faster than f2.5. It was cheaper than a Planar, too. Even so, it was a design licensed from Schneider.

Good luck with those research skills.

Link | Posted on Nov 13, 2016 at 00:03 UTC
In reply to:

PKDanny: 35 mm Edit

Leica I, 1925

Argus C3, 1939

See also: History of 135 film
A number of manufacturers started to use 35mm film for still photography between 1905 and 1913. The first 35mm cameras available to the public, and reaching significant numbers in sales were the Tourist Multiple, in 1913, and the Simplex, in 1914.[citation needed]

Oskar Barnack, who was in charge of research and development at Leitz, decided to investigate using 35 mm cine film for still cameras while attempting to build a compact camera capable of making high-quality enlargements. He built his prototype 35 mm camera (Ur-Leica) around 1913, though further development was delayed for several years by World War I. It wasn't until after World War I that Leica commercialized their first 35mm Cameras. Leitz test-marketed the design between 1923 and 1924, receiving enough positive feedback that the camera was put into production as the Leica I (for Leitz camera) in 1925. The Leica's immediate popularity spawned a number of competitors, most notably the Contax (introduced in 1932), and cemented the position of 35 mm as the format of choice for high-end compact cameras.

Kodak got into the market with the Retina I in 1934, which introduced the 135 cartridge used in all modern 35 mm cameras. Although the Retina was comparatively inexpensive, 35 mm cameras were still out of reach for most people and rollfilm remained the format of choice for mass-market cameras. This changed in 1936 with the introduction of the inexpensive Argus A and to an even greater extent in 1939 with the arrival of the immensely popular Argus C3. Although the cheapest cameras still used rollfilm, 35 mm film had come to dominate the market by the time the C3 was discontinued in 1966.

The fledgling Japanese camera industry began to take off in 1936 with the Canon 35 mm rangefinder, an improved version of the 1933 Kwanon prototype. Japanese cameras would begin to become popular in the West after Korean War veterans and soldiers stationed in Japan brought them back to the United States and elsewhere.

TLRs and SLRs Edit
See also: History of the single-lens reflex camera

A historic camera: the Contax S of 1949 — the first pentaprism SLR

Asahiflex IIb, 1954

Nikon F of 1959 — the first Japanese system camera
The first practical reflex camera was the Franke & Heidecke Rolleiflex medium format TLR of 1928. Though both single- and twin-lens reflex cameras had been available for decades, they were too bulky to achieve much popularity. The Rolleiflex, however, was sufficiently compact to achieve widespread popularity and the medium-format TLR design became popular for both high- and low-end cameras.

A similar revolution in SLR design began in 1933 with the introduction of the Ihagee Exakta, a compact SLR which used 127 rollfilm. This was followed three years later by the first Western SLR to use 135 film, the Kine Exakta (World's first true 35mm SLR was Soviet "Sport" camera, marketed several months before Kine Exakta, though "Sport" used its own film cartridge). The 35mm SLR design gained immediate popularity and there was an explosion of new models and innovative features after World War II. There were also a few 35mm TLRs, the best-known of which was the Contaflex of 1935, but for the most part these met with little success.

The first major post-war SLR innovation was the eye-level viewfinder, which first appeared on the Hungarian Duflex in 1947 and was refined in 1948 with the Contax S, the first camera to use a pentaprism. Prior to this, all SLRs were equipped with waist-level focusing screens. The Duflex was also the first SLR with an instant-return mirror, which prevented the viewfinder from being blacked out after each exposure. This same time period also saw the introduction of the Hasselblad 1600F, which set the standard for medium format SLRs for decades.

In 1952 the Asahi Optical Company (which later became well known for its Pentax cameras) introduced the first Japanese SLR using 135 film, the Asahiflex. Several other Japanese camera makers also entered the SLR market in the 1950s, including Canon, Yashica, and Nikon. Nikon's entry, the Nikon F, had a full line of interchangeable components and accessories and is generally regarded as the first Japanese system camera. It was the F, along with the earlier S series of rangefinder cameras, that helped establish Nikon's reputation as a maker of professional-quality equipment

Clearly reading comprehension is beyond you.
They undercut Zeiss IN the early 30s to sell more cameras.
Before that, they barely sold any cameras.

Link | Posted on Nov 12, 2016 at 00:43 UTC
In reply to:

PKDanny: 35 mm Edit

Leica I, 1925

Argus C3, 1939

See also: History of 135 film
A number of manufacturers started to use 35mm film for still photography between 1905 and 1913. The first 35mm cameras available to the public, and reaching significant numbers in sales were the Tourist Multiple, in 1913, and the Simplex, in 1914.[citation needed]

Oskar Barnack, who was in charge of research and development at Leitz, decided to investigate using 35 mm cine film for still cameras while attempting to build a compact camera capable of making high-quality enlargements. He built his prototype 35 mm camera (Ur-Leica) around 1913, though further development was delayed for several years by World War I. It wasn't until after World War I that Leica commercialized their first 35mm Cameras. Leitz test-marketed the design between 1923 and 1924, receiving enough positive feedback that the camera was put into production as the Leica I (for Leitz camera) in 1925. The Leica's immediate popularity spawned a number of competitors, most notably the Contax (introduced in 1932), and cemented the position of 35 mm as the format of choice for high-end compact cameras.

Kodak got into the market with the Retina I in 1934, which introduced the 135 cartridge used in all modern 35 mm cameras. Although the Retina was comparatively inexpensive, 35 mm cameras were still out of reach for most people and rollfilm remained the format of choice for mass-market cameras. This changed in 1936 with the introduction of the inexpensive Argus A and to an even greater extent in 1939 with the arrival of the immensely popular Argus C3. Although the cheapest cameras still used rollfilm, 35 mm film had come to dominate the market by the time the C3 was discontinued in 1966.

The fledgling Japanese camera industry began to take off in 1936 with the Canon 35 mm rangefinder, an improved version of the 1933 Kwanon prototype. Japanese cameras would begin to become popular in the West after Korean War veterans and soldiers stationed in Japan brought them back to the United States and elsewhere.

TLRs and SLRs Edit
See also: History of the single-lens reflex camera

A historic camera: the Contax S of 1949 — the first pentaprism SLR

Asahiflex IIb, 1954

Nikon F of 1959 — the first Japanese system camera
The first practical reflex camera was the Franke & Heidecke Rolleiflex medium format TLR of 1928. Though both single- and twin-lens reflex cameras had been available for decades, they were too bulky to achieve much popularity. The Rolleiflex, however, was sufficiently compact to achieve widespread popularity and the medium-format TLR design became popular for both high- and low-end cameras.

A similar revolution in SLR design began in 1933 with the introduction of the Ihagee Exakta, a compact SLR which used 127 rollfilm. This was followed three years later by the first Western SLR to use 135 film, the Kine Exakta (World's first true 35mm SLR was Soviet "Sport" camera, marketed several months before Kine Exakta, though "Sport" used its own film cartridge). The 35mm SLR design gained immediate popularity and there was an explosion of new models and innovative features after World War II. There were also a few 35mm TLRs, the best-known of which was the Contaflex of 1935, but for the most part these met with little success.

The first major post-war SLR innovation was the eye-level viewfinder, which first appeared on the Hungarian Duflex in 1947 and was refined in 1948 with the Contax S, the first camera to use a pentaprism. Prior to this, all SLRs were equipped with waist-level focusing screens. The Duflex was also the first SLR with an instant-return mirror, which prevented the viewfinder from being blacked out after each exposure. This same time period also saw the introduction of the Hasselblad 1600F, which set the standard for medium format SLRs for decades.

In 1952 the Asahi Optical Company (which later became well known for its Pentax cameras) introduced the first Japanese SLR using 135 film, the Asahiflex. Several other Japanese camera makers also entered the SLR market in the 1950s, including Canon, Yashica, and Nikon. Nikon's entry, the Nikon F, had a full line of interchangeable components and accessories and is generally regarded as the first Japanese system camera. It was the F, along with the earlier S series of rangefinder cameras, that helped establish Nikon's reputation as a maker of professional-quality equipment

You're misreading. Leica got a major foothold when they began undercutting Zeiss. Before that, very few were in the hands of the public.

Link | Posted on Nov 11, 2016 at 13:49 UTC
On article Canon is selling a gray version of the Rebel T6 (146 comments in total)
In reply to:

left eye: The only way this is going to look any good is if Canon duplicate their whole lens range in silver-gray.

They tried that in the 90s. The silver lenses didn't sell well. Most bought the silver rebels with black lenses.

Link | Posted on Nov 11, 2016 at 13:44 UTC
In reply to:

PKDanny: 35 mm Edit

Leica I, 1925

Argus C3, 1939

See also: History of 135 film
A number of manufacturers started to use 35mm film for still photography between 1905 and 1913. The first 35mm cameras available to the public, and reaching significant numbers in sales were the Tourist Multiple, in 1913, and the Simplex, in 1914.[citation needed]

Oskar Barnack, who was in charge of research and development at Leitz, decided to investigate using 35 mm cine film for still cameras while attempting to build a compact camera capable of making high-quality enlargements. He built his prototype 35 mm camera (Ur-Leica) around 1913, though further development was delayed for several years by World War I. It wasn't until after World War I that Leica commercialized their first 35mm Cameras. Leitz test-marketed the design between 1923 and 1924, receiving enough positive feedback that the camera was put into production as the Leica I (for Leitz camera) in 1925. The Leica's immediate popularity spawned a number of competitors, most notably the Contax (introduced in 1932), and cemented the position of 35 mm as the format of choice for high-end compact cameras.

Kodak got into the market with the Retina I in 1934, which introduced the 135 cartridge used in all modern 35 mm cameras. Although the Retina was comparatively inexpensive, 35 mm cameras were still out of reach for most people and rollfilm remained the format of choice for mass-market cameras. This changed in 1936 with the introduction of the inexpensive Argus A and to an even greater extent in 1939 with the arrival of the immensely popular Argus C3. Although the cheapest cameras still used rollfilm, 35 mm film had come to dominate the market by the time the C3 was discontinued in 1966.

The fledgling Japanese camera industry began to take off in 1936 with the Canon 35 mm rangefinder, an improved version of the 1933 Kwanon prototype. Japanese cameras would begin to become popular in the West after Korean War veterans and soldiers stationed in Japan brought them back to the United States and elsewhere.

TLRs and SLRs Edit
See also: History of the single-lens reflex camera

A historic camera: the Contax S of 1949 — the first pentaprism SLR

Asahiflex IIb, 1954

Nikon F of 1959 — the first Japanese system camera
The first practical reflex camera was the Franke & Heidecke Rolleiflex medium format TLR of 1928. Though both single- and twin-lens reflex cameras had been available for decades, they were too bulky to achieve much popularity. The Rolleiflex, however, was sufficiently compact to achieve widespread popularity and the medium-format TLR design became popular for both high- and low-end cameras.

A similar revolution in SLR design began in 1933 with the introduction of the Ihagee Exakta, a compact SLR which used 127 rollfilm. This was followed three years later by the first Western SLR to use 135 film, the Kine Exakta (World's first true 35mm SLR was Soviet "Sport" camera, marketed several months before Kine Exakta, though "Sport" used its own film cartridge). The 35mm SLR design gained immediate popularity and there was an explosion of new models and innovative features after World War II. There were also a few 35mm TLRs, the best-known of which was the Contaflex of 1935, but for the most part these met with little success.

The first major post-war SLR innovation was the eye-level viewfinder, which first appeared on the Hungarian Duflex in 1947 and was refined in 1948 with the Contax S, the first camera to use a pentaprism. Prior to this, all SLRs were equipped with waist-level focusing screens. The Duflex was also the first SLR with an instant-return mirror, which prevented the viewfinder from being blacked out after each exposure. This same time period also saw the introduction of the Hasselblad 1600F, which set the standard for medium format SLRs for decades.

In 1952 the Asahi Optical Company (which later became well known for its Pentax cameras) introduced the first Japanese SLR using 135 film, the Asahiflex. Several other Japanese camera makers also entered the SLR market in the 1950s, including Canon, Yashica, and Nikon. Nikon's entry, the Nikon F, had a full line of interchangeable components and accessories and is generally regarded as the first Japanese system camera. It was the F, along with the earlier S series of rangefinder cameras, that helped establish Nikon's reputation as a maker of professional-quality equipment

Are you sure about Leica coming before Contax? I thought Ansel Adams referred to the Leica as the "poor man's Contax" for years. Contax cameras and Zeiss lenses were almost completely out of reach. Leitz actually started by undercutting Zeiss in price.

Link | Posted on Nov 2, 2016 at 00:47 UTC
On article Narrative will stop selling its life-logging cameras (49 comments in total)
In reply to:

lattesweden: If we leave the issue aside if this was a good or bad product, again it shows that things that are dependent on cloud based servers, function wise, are getting crippled on the edge to useless for existing users once those servers are turned off.

That's not at all why it failed. People want to be in control of their picture-taking, and this thing was incredibly erratic, random, and left the owner with shots of their shadows, uncomfortable friends, and boring story-lines. Who wants that?

Link | Posted on Sep 30, 2016 at 23:48 UTC
On article ESPN publishes iPhone 7 Plus photos from US Open (354 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mindlessbuttonmasher: Those poor schmucks with their big expensive DSLR's, what were they thinking?!

They look like a bunch of photos taken with a smartphone to me; certainly not professional-looking images. The photojournalist is a great photographer (the edit on ESPN is a much better representation of his ability), but images shot on a smartphone look like images shot on a smartphone.

In the bad old days, many pros carried a film or digital point and shoot. Guys like Alex Majoli made entire careers out of point-and-shoot cameras, until a few of them got purchase-endorsements by companies like Leica.

Link | Posted on Sep 17, 2016 at 14:16 UTC
On article ESPN publishes iPhone 7 Plus photos from US Open (354 comments in total)
In reply to:

ttran88: A few more nails in the dslr coffin. Not completely shut yet but getting there.

Weddings are only a VERY SMALL market for photographers. For every wedding you can't shoot with an iPhone, there are millions of others you can.

Link | Posted on Sep 17, 2016 at 14:14 UTC
In reply to:

Toselli: Ok the old optical design, ok manual focus, ok the price (more or less), but why would I want a new (and pricy) lens that can only be used in stop down? For mirrorless it's ok, but it's not a great fun shooting on a reflex with dark viewfinder... Given that you can have the same shooting experience and lens character with something like 20 dollars...

I'm willing to bet the kickstarter lenses are nothing like the original MO lenses. These are modern retro-interpretations.

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2016 at 14:36 UTC

Back when Meyer-Optik was actually making lenses for cameras, their lenses were considered the "cheap and cheerful" of the German lens lines.

Their lenses were actually pretty poor performs but they came free with many german camera bodies, so nobody really complained much - until they bought a lens by any other German (or anything, really) manufacturer.

I thought the whole hipster thing was dying off. I was so happy that people with ironic beards were no longer lustily staring at my film cameras in the street.

;-)

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2016 at 14:34 UTC as 9th comment
On article Meyer-Optik Goerlitz launches 3-element 95mm F2.6 (124 comments in total)
In reply to:

keepreal: These lenses are very expensive. Does anything suggest there is a decent justification for this? I would not be interested even if they were giving them away. If three elements lenses can be that good, why are other top quality brands like Leica and Hasselblad not also producing them?

My suspicion is this is a case of the "King's new clothes", the marketing aiming at people who have too much money to know what to do with it, as I also suggested about the new exotic metal Trioplans.

What on earth is the point of forking out for this lens or those others? You cannot show it off like a Lamborghini.

It's not THAT expensive to coat optical lenses. It's down to an exact science. I HIGHLY doubt they coat their own lenses. They likely come ground, shaped, coated, and sealed from companies like Hoya. Whoever is behind the otherwise defunct Meyer-Optics name is just marketing.

Link | Posted on Jul 1, 2016 at 23:39 UTC
On article Meyer-Optik Goerlitz launches 3-element 95mm F2.6 (124 comments in total)
In reply to:

FelixCatana: That guy who keeps on claiming less lens elements gives you "a better 3D rendering" must be jizzing in his pants right now
http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/57590611

Well, he has "stumpled" so that explains his reasoning.
;-)

Link | Posted on Jul 1, 2016 at 23:35 UTC
On article Meyer-Optik Goerlitz launches 3-element 95mm F2.6 (124 comments in total)
In reply to:

jsimoespedro: This is borderline fraud.
The sample photos at manufacturer's website are soft. How the hell are the claimed 60MP going to be met?
The optical layout looks like a Cooke triplet with performance to match. This is simply the simplest, cheapest, lowest performance lens to make.

Actually, honest-to-goodness Meyer-Optic lenses of years gone by were soft and poor... So if they're pitching the name for poor quality, they're bang on. They obviously found a group of silly people who were willing to buy it for the price they set.

Link | Posted on Jul 1, 2016 at 23:33 UTC
On article Meyer-Optik Goerlitz launches 3-element 95mm F2.6 (124 comments in total)

People seem to be jumping on this as if it's a luxury brand. Meyer Goerlitz tended to make lousy camera optics. Most of their lenses were cheap-and-cheerful. Now they're recreating them and charging a fortune for them.

Link | Posted on Jul 1, 2016 at 13:08 UTC as 20th comment
On article Worth the wait? A look inside the Pentax K-1 (649 comments in total)
In reply to:

disasterpiece: AF only covering half of the frame's width? What time is it, 2004 maybe?

It's "loser" not "looser", bro.

Keep in mind that, like most contemporary PDAF systems, the boxes represent the centre of each focusing element. The detectors themselves likely extend outwards enough to detect focusing cues closer to the edge of the frame. Of course, you better not have any curvature of field in that lens you're using or you're in for a surprise, anyway.

Link | Posted on Feb 22, 2016 at 16:46 UTC
On article Nikon's New D5 and D500 Push the Boundaries of DSLR (720 comments in total)
In reply to:

Boss of Sony: Unfortunately DSLRs are only really for pros nowadays. Nobody I know wants to lug around a dslr anymore. Even my friend who has been a full time pro photographer for 15 years has switched entirely to Fuji with the x-t1.

I think the point here is "never say never"... Never say you can't shoot a wedding with Mirrorless gear. Likewise, never assume someone with a D810 actually knows what they're doing... ;-)

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2016 at 17:47 UTC
On article Kodak revives Super 8 with part-digital cine camera (362 comments in total)
In reply to:

Stephen McDonald: Nest thing you know, Quadraphonic records will be back and maybe this time, they'll get it right, so you can actually hear something from those rear channels. And I can't wait to use my 8-Track recorder again.

Well, with stereo there's no real requirement that you sit absolutely still, in just the right spot to hear your music properly. Let's not even talk about having to have at least twice the number of speakers, twice the number of amplifiers, twice the preamps, twice the space to hold it all...

Even in the worst implementations, stereo provides a pleasing method of reproduction. There are ways of creating additional rear sound imagery with two speakers - that's pretty much what happens now. It was kind-of like how MiniDisc and DCC didn't take off... It just wasn't the right combo of practical and groundbreaking.

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2016 at 16:37 UTC
On article Nikon's New D5 and D500 Push the Boundaries of DSLR (720 comments in total)
In reply to:

Boss of Sony: Unfortunately DSLRs are only really for pros nowadays. Nobody I know wants to lug around a dslr anymore. Even my friend who has been a full time pro photographer for 15 years has switched entirely to Fuji with the x-t1.

You wouldn't photograph a wedding with a Fuji XT-1 because C-AF couldn't keep up? What kind of weddings do you attend? Ones where everyone is running away in chaos from each other?

People forget that some of the coolest baseball card shots were taken with 'Blads on the diamond. Apparently those guys with 800mm Zeiss manual focus lenses and focus tabs knew how to track a runner...

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2016 at 16:09 UTC
On article Behind the Camera: A conversation with Peter Hurley (64 comments in total)
In reply to:

papa natas: Well, I'll get hell back here from the teeming millions on account of what I think, and by the way, I NEVER write OMHO.. I'm not humble.
1- It's stupid to ass-u-me that we ALL have converted to 4K. That goes to whomever had the brilliant idea to post this video in 4K.
2- This Hurley guy, of which I never seen his work, may have or be rough talent. Then, I cannot help but to reminisce the Old talent: those guys such as Hamilton, Adams, Leidmann, Clarke, Newton, and the list goes on, who were issued from the Plastic Arts & Visual Media environment; then came to discover photography with MANUAL cameras.
They had to LEARN the trade the good old way: to master composition, f stop and shutter speed with a narrow window of 36 shots. Nowadays it will be a capital sin not to get a dozen of decent images out of 500 shots. It's like shooting fish in a barrel, mind you.
For these guys Bokeh wasn't an artistic expression.

So, here we see an example of someone who couldn't possibly get the photos Peter Hurley gets. Why? Because he spends time on DPReview trolling, and because he appears to be a grumpy individual.

Who cares about Gary Bernstein... We're not talking about him here. But he appears to be living quite comfortably in California. Certainly, shooting with a now obsolete film was his choice, not to make it harder on himself, but because it was easier for him to ship the film off to a local Kodachrome developing house and get his slides back and many of his clients (because of the times) simply wanted K64 slides.

Don't make it sound like film-photographers toiled in despair while those who choose digital cameras have it easy. You still have to be a nice person and be there.

Good luck.

Link | Posted on Dec 30, 2015 at 15:50 UTC
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