light_bulb

Lives in Germany Ruhr Area, Germany
Works as a Researcher
Joined on May 30, 2008

Comments

Total: 14, showing: 1 – 14
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1241 comments in total)
In reply to:

light_bulb: Nice review, however it lacks comparison of the high resolution shot mode with higher specced cameras in terms of resolution like has been performed by imaging resource, or have I missed something?

What exactly is not confusing about the menue of e.g. a D800?
The more capable a camera is in terms of features and customisation, the bulkier the menue has to be. In particular with functions you do not use that often, some menue diving will be required unless you learn the menue structure by heart. After more than three years of extensive use of D800/D800e cameras I would not say that I am exactly feeling at home in the menue.
Whether you find yourself at home in the menue, is largely a matter of taste. Personally, I prefer functions that are available but somewhat buried in the menue over those that are simply unavailable.
Cheers Andreas

Well, I have now found some mention of the high resolution shot mode in the paragraph on image stabilisation. Even though IBIS seems to be the only way to achieve this, I would have expected to find it in the chapter refering to image quality. Thus not only menues might look fuzzy ;-)
The examples provided by imaging resource of Olympus images made using this mode demonstrate that you get pretty close to results that can be achieved using a Canon 5DSR in terms of resolution and noise which deserves quite some mention, given the widespread view that such image quality inevitably requires larger sensors.
By the way it demonstrates another advantage of IBIS over the fact that it is more user friendly when IS is upgraded for all lenses with a new camera than if you have to buy new lenses for each iteration of IS: IBIS offers high resolution as a side-effect which cannot be had by IS in lenses.

Link | Posted on Nov 26, 2016 at 16:52 UTC
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1241 comments in total)

Nice review, however it lacks comparison of the high resolution shot mode with higher specced cameras in terms of resolution like has been performed by imaging resource, or have I missed something?

What exactly is not confusing about the menue of e.g. a D800?
The more capable a camera is in terms of features and customisation, the bulkier the menue has to be. In particular with functions you do not use that often, some menue diving will be required unless you learn the menue structure by heart. After more than three years of extensive use of D800/D800e cameras I would not say that I am exactly feeling at home in the menue.
Whether you find yourself at home in the menue, is largely a matter of taste. Personally, I prefer functions that are available but somewhat buried in the menue over those that are simply unavailable.
Cheers Andreas

Link | Posted on Nov 26, 2016 at 09:52 UTC as 60th comment | 2 replies
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1241 comments in total)
In reply to:

marike6: Back when the original EM5 was reviewed, DPR may have confused a lot of users when they said that IQ was, more or less as good as APS-C, and that you needed to go to FF to see a dramatic improvement in IQ. Yeah, well no. I've been shooting with the EM10 for the last few months to see what all the fuss is about, and it's a good shooter, but honestly IQ really doesn't compete well with my D7100 or the Fujifilm cameras I've owned. FF isn't even part of the discussion, I'm not sure why forums are filled with some many comparisons threads. Sure you can make great images with the Olympus and Panasonic cameras, but for subjects like landscape where you want low ISO RAW files to have as little noise and as much DR and bold colors as possible, other systems have a clear advantage. That said, for people already invested in m43, this camera should make a lot of people happy.

This is not true. Take a look at the comparison with the 5DS with the very innovative Olympus high resolution shots at imaging resource to know better. This camera ticks a combination of boxes that requires several cameras from other makes.

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2016 at 18:24 UTC
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1241 comments in total)
In reply to:

lzeppelin: Through the years physics do not change. the image quality in critical light conditions and resolution are directly proportional to the sensor diagonal size. This is theory of signals and Studio Scene confirms this. As long as I can shot very still subjects and use low ISO, it's okay, but if you need to freeze the moment, and have to raise the ISO, this sensor size is still too far from the full format performance, to be taken seriously by professionals. Micro 4/3 estimators should live with it, that format was wrong from the beginning, and now we can all forget it. The low performances of this new camera in low light prove it. Damn that time when I let your clamor convince me and I bought a pen-f, which is just good looking camera and nothing more!

This has been discussed ad nausea. I have Nikon D800s and also FT lenses and may add this camera for having more options. Think about it.

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2016 at 17:42 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: when studio lenses retire (202 comments in total)

I guess a lot of this is about either a nostalgic trend (the hipster has to shoot old and dirty) or experiences of old farts and their feelings about lenses they have used for quite bit of time. For the most part it does not make sense to artificially cripple high resolution sensors with lenses that are not up to the task.
But to each his/her own.
It you want to save money combine such lenses with a D700. But beware of the 'clinical' look at the pixel level ;-) because with this kind of resolution their 'character' might disappear.
BTW I have plenty of old lenses. The old Olympus OMs really look like jewels with their shiney rubber focussing rings. Nikkors simply cannot compare in this regard.
But they cannot be used on my D800E and are waiting for a Sony A7RII. Will they be good enough for this camera? I guess most will not except for the macro.
I like to use a Pentax FA 120/4 macro adapted to a D800E. Is that old enough to qualify for this thread?
Cheers Andreas

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2016 at 20:14 UTC as 8th comment

Seemingly, imaging will develop similar to music consumption. In former times electronics companies could sell relatively big hifi installations to households even with vinyl records. With mp3 or streaming you can just use a smartphone and perhaps a WiFi-connected active speaker system or headphones which seem to be selling well. With lower mp3 qualities, a super hifi system does not make sense.
For many users smartphone cameras deliver what they need and by using them they can deal way better with display-based framing than many of the older DSLR-guys. This increases the likelyhood that if at all they will step up to enthusiast compact or mirrorless cameras.
Recent fullframe high resolution DSLR combined with up to the task lenses are far above what the average Joe will ever spend.
We have already seen the biggest innovations with DSLR and there is not much in it for new models of APS DSLR having reached 24mpix or even more combined with the usual kit lenses or superzooms.
The age of diminishing expectations has begun.

Link | Posted on Oct 29, 2015 at 19:22 UTC as 15th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Photato: Looking at the specs of this phone makes me puke.
This is one of the reasons Sony has been struggling with their Mobile division and keep losing money year after year.
Somebody there needs to understand the value of balance, optimization, restraint and user experience are more important than filling spec sheets with bigger numbers.
Meanwhile Apple has no problem selling their iPhones in record numbers at MSRP with "just" a 1080P screen and a 8MP camera.

... It is about many appleholics too who have no clue of specs.

Link | Posted on Sep 3, 2015 at 18:30 UTC
On article Phase One 645DF+ with IQ250 field test (138 comments in total)

Thanks for the review Damian.
However what you have written concerning highlight recovery/shadow lifting in post pretty much reminds me of my experience with the Pentax 645D and it would require further testing to demonstrate that this - at least at base ISO - is superior over a Nikon D8X0 or Canon 5DS/R.
Moreover there are not that many fast lenses for medium format and MF sensors are usually smaller than the respective film formats which results in not that shallow DOF than one might expect.
Generally larger sensors have been somewhat overrated taking into account that sensor development is focused on small sensors and high pixel densities which results in a trickle up of technical progress to larger sensors which eliminates some of their size-related advantages.
Thus the air for medium format has become somewhat thinner.

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2015 at 19:00 UTC as 5th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

light_bulb: It is one of the most obvious contradictions of our days that we see how insecure the internet is, while at the same time more and more business models are based on cloud storage and permanent internet access.
Every hardware that has significant resources to offer and is permanenty online is just an invitation to NSA and other hackers to apply their malware.
Farewell Adobe!

I did not suggest that CC requires a computer that is permanently online (how often do you have to to qualify for using a service you have paid for?) or that you have to store your files in the cloud. I was referring to a general trend and Adobe has done a first step into that direction that you may or may not like.

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2015 at 08:17 UTC

It is one of the most obvious contradictions of our days that we see how insecure the internet is, while at the same time more and more business models are based on cloud storage and permanent internet access.
Every hardware that has significant resources to offer and is permanenty online is just an invitation to NSA and other hackers to apply their malware.
Farewell Adobe!

Link | Posted on Jun 25, 2015 at 15:19 UTC as 14th comment | 5 replies
On article CP+ 2015: Canon shows off prototype 120MP CMOS sensor (255 comments in total)

What they did not tell is that this sensor has been designed on behalf of the NSA.

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2015 at 19:26 UTC as 26th comment | 2 replies
On article Best Camera of 2012: And the Winner is... (1414 comments in total)
In reply to:

adrianf2: OK. Olympus won 'fair and square'. But what exactly did they win? A popularity contest among the visitors to this site from a pre-determined list that excluded many excellent cameras.

I have bought a D800 and voted for it. However if the OMD were able to properly AF my FT lenses I do not know what I would have done.

In a side by side comparison with low dof shots (D800 85 1.8 G versus OMD 45 1.8) the OMD was the clear winner. With its image stabilisation and face recognition it was good for so many keepers, while the D800 setup was a lot of miss and seldom hit. The focus sensors are simply to big for this kind resolution/low dof and focusing accuracy seems to lack too.

This OMD technology is what every low dof portrait shooter would like to have instead of fiddling with focus sensors. You can even choose which eye the camera should focus on.

Thus the D800 certainly has its strong points but the OMD is a much smaller package combined with very good image quality and some compelling innovations.

Link | Posted on Jan 2, 2013 at 11:38 UTC
On article Just posted: Sigma 35mm F1.4 DG HSM lens review (182 comments in total)

Sigma has managed to do some serious overhaul with their lenses.
I am using the Sigma 120-300 2.8 OS and am very happy. No reason to go for a 5k $ Nikkor.

Link | Posted on Dec 22, 2012 at 16:23 UTC as 23rd comment
Total: 14, showing: 1 – 14