Michael Uschold

Lives in United States Seattle, WA, United States
Works as a Semantic Technology Consultant
Joined on Mar 22, 2009

Comments

Total: 48, showing: 1 – 20
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On article This vibrant hyper-lapse shows off New York in 8K (64 comments in total)

It's 8K. OK. How could anyone tell? Does this footage in any way shape or form distinguish itself from what could have been done with 4K or HD? One thing might be the ability to zoom in, but how noticeable would that be? Would it be just showing off, or could it add significantly to the viewer's experience?

I recently made an 11x16 print from a Canon S45 4 megapixel camera. I was surprised at how sharp and vibrant it was. For that size, more megapixels only enables more cropping, not more quality.

So how does it work for 8K? What technology do you need to notice a significant difference?

Link | Posted on Aug 27, 2016 at 18:42 UTC as 7th comment | 1 reply

It works both ways. I find that my enjoyment of everyday things skyrockets if I try to photograph them - e.g. an orange peel lying on the counter (http://www.dpreview.com/galleries/0383714938/photos/3106194/appeeling-light)

Conversely, I generally no longer take photographs of fireworks displays, because it makes it impossible to just look around and enjoy the full experience. There are always exceptions, but I hypothesize that for most people, trying to photograph their experience of making love would worsen the experience.

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2016 at 00:00 UTC as 26th comment
On article Nikon D5 real-world low light, high ISO samples (281 comments in total)

This is great low light performance, however the ISO numbers are painful to make any sense of.

POP QUIZ: How may stops bigger than ISO 102000 is ISO 3,280,000?

You have to keep count of how many times you have to multiply the smaller number by 2 till you get the larger number. This is what log scales are for, and we already have one, we just have to start using it. For example, 100 speed is written as ISO 100/21°, One stop faster is written ISO 200/24°. It goes up by 3 for each doubling in speed.

So for the above quiz, the math is much easier if the speeds are written as ISO 102000/51° and ISO 3,280,000/66°. SUbtract 51 from 66 to get 15, and divide by 3 to get 5 stops. Viola.

And you dont have to do any math at all to get an intuitive grasp of the number. With the super high numbers, it is easy to get the number of 0s wrong.

See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Film_speed#DIN.

Link | Posted on Apr 1, 2016 at 00:19 UTC as 62nd comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

Banhmi: "This is sponsored content, created with the support of Canon" since when did this start happening? Is this only being mentioned now as a result of the Lord & Taylor vs. FTC legal dispute?

Perhaps so, but I did not see the signpost at all.

Link | Posted on Mar 16, 2016 at 16:56 UTC

This video is very good, but beware, it is as much or more about fishing as it is about the camera. All the information in the video that pertains to the camera could have been shown in a video in 3-4 minutes, rather than the 8.

I would love to know how the camera was protected from the rain and water.

Link | Posted on Mar 16, 2016 at 16:54 UTC as 11th comment | 4 replies

Can this adapter be used with any Canon EF lens without compromise, or just the Sigma lenses?

Link | Posted on Mar 2, 2016 at 17:57 UTC as 85th comment | 12 replies
In reply to:

JurijTurnsek: Lets use this oppurtunity to let the product planning team that we want new APS-C lenses!

YES, YES and YES. There is a real dearth of lenses for the NEX and subsequent Sony APS-C bodies.

Link | Posted on Feb 4, 2016 at 20:09 UTC

An iPhone photo could easily grace the cover of National Geographic, and noone would know the difference.

The line of reasoning for picking the a6000 as the best overall camera is fine and will be most helpful for beginning or intermediate photographers who are not sure what their specific interests are. The irony is, these 'best camera selections' that are not the best at any one thing, will generaly be a poor choice for the vast numbers of photographers who ARE clear on their priorities (e.g. action, low light, video, dynamic range)

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2016 at 20:48 UTC as 109th comment

I agree, it is unhelpful and misleading to say 'all cameras are great'. Better to say y"ou can get great pictures from any camera". But the best camera for a given individual depends on the kind of photography that is important to them.

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2016 at 20:30 UTC as 110th comment
On article What's missing? Ming Thein on the state of mirrorless (744 comments in total)

Nice blog article. I have an NEX 6, with a very annoying problem that was not mentioned in the article. Maybe all the other mirrorless models get it right?

The light is dim and I am shooting on tripod. I am using live view to get very precise focus by enlarging the view by 10x or so. BUT: at a small aperture, not enough light gets in, and the focus does not work, highly pixelated. So I have to open up the lens all the way, focus, and then close it back down again.

It is incredibly annoying and should not be necessary, there should be a setting that leaves it open the whole time, but still shoots at the smaller aperture.

Link | Posted on Nov 7, 2015 at 00:28 UTC as 88th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Michael Uschold: It is great to see an offering for photographers who care more about low light capabilities than making billboard-sized prints. I'd like to take it a step further, and have an offering for still photographers that leaves out all the fancyy video features. That might make the camera much more affordable, and a better fit for that [albeit possibly shrinking] market.

It is a bit ironic that they dramatically reduce pixels for stills, but still have the most possible for video. I wonder how much real value there is for 4K video, beyond marketing. Hardly anybody has 4k screens.

To: BrianHalcYoN
I have a NEX 6, and was amazed at how good the EVF is, I expected it to be dubiuos. You may have more exacting needs that mine.

Link | Posted on Sep 13, 2015 at 22:57 UTC

It is great to see an offering for photographers who care more about low light capabilities than making billboard-sized prints. I'd like to take it a step further, and have an offering for still photographers that leaves out all the fancyy video features. That might make the camera much more affordable, and a better fit for that [albeit possibly shrinking] market.

It is a bit ironic that they dramatically reduce pixels for stills, but still have the most possible for video. I wonder how much real value there is for 4K video, beyond marketing. Hardly anybody has 4k screens.

Link | Posted on Sep 11, 2015 at 18:01 UTC as 100th comment | 3 replies
On article Sony reportedly shifting focus to full-frame cameras (447 comments in total)
In reply to:

Anastigmat: That is long overdue. Manufacturers have been profiteering from artificially high prices on FF DSLR cameras, refusing to lower the prices even though the sensors do not cost all that much to make. The old excuse made about 10-12 years ago was the FF sensors were prohibitively expensive. Sony has in fact successfully made even larger medium format CMOS sensors so economically that most manufacturers have switched to them. It takes a slump in the DSLR camera business for manufacturers to finally reduce prices on FF models, but only at the low end, and we are given plastic bodied low end FF models as punishment for not spending more money on more expensive FF models. FF cameras need to come way down in price, and APS-C cameras should be phased out completely. There is no reason for APS-C models since most DSLR cameras are large enough to accommodate FF sensors.

I disagree that there is no reason for APS-C models. Compact and light is a great reason. FF lenses have to be larger and heavier, no way around that. I love having large pixels for light gathering, but APS-C is more than enough for a lot of professional work.

And who really needs all those extra pixels? I was amazed at how sharp and beautiful a 11x17 print I got from a Canon S45 compact 4 megapixe cameral. I bet that 4 mega-pixels is plenty enough for a National Geographic cover photo too, which is half that size.

Link | Posted on Aug 5, 2015 at 18:40 UTC
On article Sony rides wave of US Mirrorless sales surge (733 comments in total)

I sure wish this would spawn the development of a wider seletion of affordable E-Mount lenses for NEX cameras. There are plenty of FE mount lenses coming on line, but their size and weight defeats the purpose of having small light camera.

Link | Posted on Jun 4, 2015 at 18:26 UTC as 77th comment | 5 replies

For those of you wondering whether you want to get the CC version or upgrade, here are some numbers. This is most relevant for those who already own a desktop version of LR, like to upgrade regularly and cannot or do not want to pay for a PS desktop version.

LR5 came out June 9, 2013, which is 681 days (22.37 months) before LR6 came out. It was only 461 days or 15.14 from LR4 to LR5.

1. CC: LR + PS $9.99/month

2a. Desktop: LR5 to LR6 average cost was $3.53/month ($79 / 22.37)
2b: Desktop: LR4 to LR5 average cost was $5.21/month ($79 / 15.14)
2c: Deskt op: LR4 to LR6 average cost was $4.21/month ($158/ 37.52)

So if having PS is worth $5.78 or so per month ($9.99 - $4.21) and you like small monthly payments, it may be worth considering PS + LR CC.

I generally don't like subscription software, but these numbers kind of surprised me. I don't happen to need PS, but for those that do, price does not seem to be a significant deterant from getting PS + LR CC.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2015 at 22:11 UTC as 95th comment | 13 replies

To get the $79 desktop upgrade, do this:
1. Paste this link into a browser: https://www.adobe.com/products/catalog/software._sl_id-contentfilter_sl_catalog_sl_software_sl_mostpopular.html
2. Scroll down to Photoshop Lightroom 6 and click Buy.
3. Next to the "I want to buy" change the dropdown from Full to Upgrade.
4. Select the version of LR you currently have.
5. Click "Add to Cart"

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2015 at 21:36 UTC as 99th comment

As an owner of a NEX 6, I get excited when I see a new Sony lens announced, but they all seem to be for full frame, some of which can also fit my NEX 6. But this is overkill in size, weight and cost for my needs. I bought the NEX-6 is to be compact and light. So what was meant to excite, disappoints.

Sigh... If only Canon had a decent mirrorless offering, I would have got one a couple years ago.

Link | Posted on Mar 5, 2015 at 00:41 UTC as 21st comment | 2 replies
On article Lytro plans to shed jobs as it shifts focus to video (506 comments in total)
In reply to:

Michael Uschold: Is anyone aware of a single person that is making serious use of this technology that goes beyond it being an amusing gimick? What would that use be? Is this person a lone wolf, or are there significant numbers of people that found a greate niche use for this camera? What would those niche's be? There was a lot of hoopla about the Segway, which many regard as a flop. It has had dramatically less impact than the inventors imagined, but I think there are some important use cases to justify continued production, e.g. large manufacturing floors, postal delivery and police officers.

Personally, I think Lytro will be very lucky to find any significant cadre of users for the camera, but people have boundless creativity, so who knows.

Sure, but auto-focus is 1) clearly useful to 2) a lot of people for 3) very obvoius reasons. Noone can say that for Lytro at this point.

Link | Posted on Mar 2, 2015 at 21:10 UTC
On article Lytro plans to shed jobs as it shifts focus to video (506 comments in total)

Is anyone aware of a single person that is making serious use of this technology that goes beyond it being an amusing gimick? What would that use be? Is this person a lone wolf, or are there significant numbers of people that found a greate niche use for this camera? What would those niche's be? There was a lot of hoopla about the Segway, which many regard as a flop. It has had dramatically less impact than the inventors imagined, but I think there are some important use cases to justify continued production, e.g. large manufacturing floors, postal delivery and police officers.

Personally, I think Lytro will be very lucky to find any significant cadre of users for the camera, but people have boundless creativity, so who knows.

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2015 at 21:51 UTC as 30th comment | 4 replies
On photo Watkins Glen - Rainbow Falls in whumber's photo gallery (2 comments in total)

beautiful light

Link | Posted on Jan 24, 2015 at 01:48 UTC as 2nd comment
Total: 48, showing: 1 – 20
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