Jose Francisco Salgado

Jose Francisco Salgado

DPReview Contributor
Lives in United States Chicago, IL, United States
Works as a Astronomer and Visual Artist
Has a website at josefrancisco.org
Joined on May 11, 2016
About me:

José Francisco Salgado is an Emmy-nominated astronomer (BS in Physics, Univ. of Puerto Rico; PhD in Astronomy, Univ. of Michigan), experimental photographer, visual artist, and public speaker who creates multimedia works that communicate science in engaging ways. As the Executive Director and co-founder of KV 265, a non-profit science and arts education organization, Dr. Salgado collaborates with orchestras, composers, and musicians to present films that provoke curiosity and a sense of wonder about the Earth and the Universe.

His work was first featured on DP Review in this in-the-field feature of the Nikon D810a.

Comments

Total: 62, showing: 41 – 60
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On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ultimatumini: Inspiring work! Really makes me want to head to the Badlands now!

Thank you! That was my second visit and its not going to be my last. Cheers!

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 16:13 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

Will B Milner: Looks like a great lens, it would be cool to see the astigmatism in the corners when stopped down to f/2.8-f/4 and mounted on a sidereal tracker. My AF-S 18-35G is terrible at all apertures in the corners... but still produces workable results at f/4. https://www.dpreview.com/galleries/6796454585/photos/3635272/durdle-door-at-night

Beautiful work, Will. Thanks for sharing!

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 16:12 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

WebmasterNeal: I rented the lens and tested it out last night as well. If you're going to buy it to use it at f1.8 for astro, I wouldn't recommend it as the coma too much for my liking. Like the author said, at f2.8 it was fine, but then it's in the same range as the Rokinon lenses and it's another $1,000 for this lens.
The other two issues I had was it's really heavy and with my MC-11 adapter, it eventually stopped working and my shutter stopped working for some reason with this lens after about 10 shots. I put my 14mm Rokinon on after that and it worked fine.

Thanks for sharing your experience. I am used to the weight of the Nikkor 14-24mm so, personally, weight is not much of an issue. I think the real advantage for me will be when I photograph auroras next time since its light gathering power will be a great advantage. When people are looking at beautiful aurora stills and time-lapse sequences no one pays attention to stars near the edges. Having said that, take a look at the posted full-res images, coma is an issue only on the very bright stars. Thanks again!

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 16:10 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

Martin JC: An excellent, thoughtful and clear review. Thank you José....

Thanks for reading it and sharing your opinion, Martin!

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 16:02 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

FuhTeng: How neat, thank you Dr. Salgado. Your video with the D810A is one of my favorites from that wonderful series DPR has done. I hope this will be a good tool for you.

I have a technical question - Why not use a little motor-mount to keep exposures really long by letting the motor move the camera with the rotation of the earth? I've never used one but I'd like to have the opportunity to try it.

Hi FuhTeng, please call me José Francisco. I thoroughly enjoyed my participation in the production of the D810A video. I am glad you liked it. I have one of those clock drives (it was featured in the D810A video) but should experiment with it more. The landscape would be motion blurred but one could always expose for the it separately with the motor off (even take the mean of a series of exposures to reduce noise) and make a composition using a mask. Perhaps material for a future article. Thanks for your comments!

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 16:01 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mikity: Thanks for the great, detailed review José!
Although I am not sure why you insist on having "PhD" on all your watermarks... I'm a fellow astronomer, and neither I nor any of my colleagues tend to be that ostentatious about our titles ;)

Thanks, Mikity! There are pros and cons which can be discussed in a different forum. Sadly, a con is the possibility of being considered ostentatious. ;-) I don't insist at all. That is simply a credit label and it is mine. The only thing I ask (not insist) is being called José Francisco because I prefer it to simply José. I am glad you enjoyed the article. All the best!

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 15:49 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

Alexey Kulachatov: I would like to see a direct comparison with Nikkor 14-24. I probably will be the only one who did not like the quality of the picture in the corners.

Me too. I plan to do that in September on a Nikon body. Stay tuned!

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 15:12 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

Greg VdB: Very nice to see an astro-centric product review on DPR! Thanks for the interesting samples and evaluation, Jose.

The lens looks good - not perfect, but in an UWA f/1.8 lens, it is one heck of a balance act to optimize sharpness and the different optical aberrations. According to the LensTip review, the situation looks even better on APS-C...

Thanks for reading it! I agree, Greg. It is very impressive for such a wide angle.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 15:11 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

silentstorm: I really dig the timelapse! Beautiful stuff! Thank you! :D

I am glad you did! Thank you very much.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 15:08 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

biza43: Seems like a winner of a lens. Great photos too, thanks for the article.

Thanks for reading it!

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 15:08 UTC
On article Cinetics Lynx motion control system review (10 comments in total)
In reply to:

otto k: Great work! Nice change of pace from typical review, like the updates suggestions.

Thanks for your feedback, Otto.

Link | Posted on Mar 8, 2017 at 04:23 UTC
On article Cinetics Lynx motion control system review (10 comments in total)
In reply to:

Xentinus: Such an awesome review. I love that "updates I'd like to see" part very much. Thanks for your effort!

Thanks for your input, Xentinus! I hope to review more gear soon.

Link | Posted on Mar 8, 2017 at 04:22 UTC
On article Heavenly bodies: Nikon D810 & D810A field test (111 comments in total)
In reply to:

BasilG: Can't figure out the cover shot of the video. It looks like Moebius arch, but if memory serves me right, that one is too small for a human to stand inside it. What am I missing...?

Hi Basil. It is the Mobius Arch. It's not huge but it is big enough for one to stand up inside. Google it and you'll find other photos with people. Take a look at the video if you haven't done so already. Cheers!

Link | Posted on May 16, 2016 at 07:14 UTC
On article Heavenly bodies: Nikon D810 & D810A field test (111 comments in total)
In reply to:

KL Matt: OMG you got to shoot with SALGADO!!!! Oh wait. It's not THAT Salgado.

Hey, I would get excited about shooting with *that* Salgado! ;-)

Link | Posted on May 12, 2016 at 15:07 UTC
On article Heavenly bodies: Nikon D810 & D810A field test (111 comments in total)
In reply to:

HD Knucklehead: Quote, “these tools engage people and will make some young boy or girl to follow a career in science,” not realistic, these tools are too expense for a young boy or girl to purchase.
Interesting video though.

True, @Barney, @Thematic.

Link | Posted on May 12, 2016 at 06:48 UTC
On article Heavenly bodies: Nikon D810 & D810A field test (111 comments in total)
In reply to:

AnakChan: I was expecting a D810 vs D810A Ha comparison too :D. I have the D810A like it. Here's a timelapse I did a few months back.

https://vimeo.com/151637949

I usually dislike planes but I must say that they add a cool factor to your sequence, especially with that filter.

Link | Posted on May 12, 2016 at 06:21 UTC
On article Heavenly bodies: Nikon D810 & D810A field test (111 comments in total)
In reply to:

yuiop: Jose, go blue.

I need to share this with my former professors, Go Blue! ;-)

Link | Posted on May 12, 2016 at 05:08 UTC
On article Heavenly bodies: Nikon D810 & D810A field test (111 comments in total)
In reply to:

HD Knucklehead: Quote, “these tools engage people and will make some young boy or girl to follow a career in science,” not realistic, these tools are too expense for a young boy or girl to purchase.
Interesting video though.

You have a point, HD, and I had a similar thought after I said that but then I remembered that when I was teenager I worked many hours at the local shopping mall so I could buy my first telescope (a Meade DS-10). Back in the 80s $1000 was a lot of money but I did it so this is not that unrealistic, especially if parents and grandparents help :). I'm glad you found the video interesting. Thanks for your comment!

Link | Posted on May 12, 2016 at 05:04 UTC
On article Heavenly bodies: Nikon D810 & D810A field test (111 comments in total)
In reply to:

AnakChan: I was expecting a D810 vs D810A Ha comparison too :D. I have the D810A like it. Here's a timelapse I did a few months back.

https://vimeo.com/151637949

Good job. I'm assuming you used a fog filter, right? Cheers!

Link | Posted on May 12, 2016 at 04:57 UTC
On article Heavenly bodies: Nikon D810 & D810A field test (111 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lars V: Beautiful, entertaining and informative, thanks for sharing.
Any chance you could tell more about the time lapse setups used?

Hi Lars, for the time-lapse sequence of the Mobius Arch shot with the D810A I used the following settings: 20 sec, ƒ/2.8, ISO 6400. I pulled more information from the shadows using Adobe LR6. Finally, I panned the sequence vertically in post using Adobe After Effects and rendered the movie at 30 fps. The other sequences shown were shot in Chile in 2009 back when my main camera was a D3. Please feel free to write for other details. Cheers!

Link | Posted on May 11, 2016 at 21:51 UTC
Total: 62, showing: 41 – 60
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