Jose Francisco Salgado

Jose Francisco Salgado

DPReview Contributor
Lives in United States Chicago, IL, United States
Works as a Astronomer and Visual Artist
Has a website at josefrancisco.org
Joined on May 11, 2016
About me:

José Francisco Salgado is an Emmy-nominated astronomer (BS in Physics, Univ. of Puerto Rico; PhD in Astronomy, Univ. of Michigan), experimental photographer, visual artist, and public speaker who creates multimedia works that communicate science in engaging ways. As the Executive Director and co-founder of KV 265, a non-profit science and arts education organization, Dr. Salgado collaborates with orchestras, composers, and musicians to present films that provoke curiosity and a sense of wonder about the Earth and the Universe.

His work was first featured on DP Review in this in-the-field feature of the Nikon D810a.

Comments

Total: 62, showing: 21 – 40
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On article How to photograph the northern lights (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

polizonte: These are beautiful shots, thanks for the informative article - I attempted to take photos like these and it wasn't so easy.

Thank you very much. I hope you get good shots next time! Please let us know if you have any questions.

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2017 at 23:14 UTC
On article How to photograph the northern lights (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

photophile: Superb images José and thanks for sharing your tips.

Thank you very much! Feel free to send us questions. Cheers!

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2017 at 16:07 UTC
On article How to photograph the northern lights (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

fyngyrz: > Anything wider than 24mm will work, though a 14mm or 16mm lens will allow for more dramatic shots.

This is *very* bad advice. A 24mm or 30mm lens will be just fine, as will a 50mm lens. For that matter, an 85mm lens can get you some superb detail. And as a bonus, they distort the scene less, although you can fix that in post at the cost of some of the edge detail.

The lens mm - its width, or magnification for this use - can vary according to the distance of the auroras being shot - they can be anywhere, from on the horizon, to right over your head.

This Montana gallery was taken with 24mm to 85mm lenses:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/fyngyrz/albums/72157621795614108

This shot was taken at 50mm:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/fyngyrz/14069655760/in/album-72157621795614108/

This one at 85mm:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/fyngyrz/2321665774/in/album-72157621795614108/

You want a fast lens, sure. But wide landscape shots are not the only good way to capture nice aurora photos.

I see where you are coming from but you are missing our point. If you are in Montana the auroras will look smaller (and close to the northern horizon) and a smaller FOV might be adequate. But our article and photographs concentrate on locations under the aurora oval. Of course, if you see that the auroras look small then you can use more magnification. We trust that people will use their own judgement regarding composition!

But what you say in no way describes aurora photography under the oval. There's no way that a 30mm lens will do the job unless it is a rare night (at least in Yellowknife) with auroras of small angular size --or if for some reason, you want to concentrate on a particular feature of the aurora. That's absolutely valid. I think I have shot auroras at 24 mm only a couple of times (perhaps never at > 24mm). See for yourself:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/josefranciscosalgado/albums/72157647463157014

Regarding lens distortion, I stand by my Nikon and Sigma 14mm lenses.

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2017 at 16:04 UTC
On article How to photograph the northern lights (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

Albert Valentino: The images are great but the video is incredible.

Thank you, Albert. It was great shooting it despite the sub zero temperatures!

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2017 at 15:46 UTC
On a photo in the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Astrophotography Samples sample gallery (7 comments in total)
In reply to:

SirSeth: Impressive. I'd like to get results anywhere close to this good and I just don't know how yet. Maybe I just need to try a faster wider lens, but I usually try to use my A7+OM28mm f3.5 and I either get star tails from rotation of the earth or not enough light to illuminate the foreground. Or too much noise, or Sony is sucking up stars with the star gobbler. I don't know. But these are inspiring and make me want to try again.

Thank you! F3.5 is too slow, I am afraid. Try at least with an F2.8 lens. All the best!

Link | Posted on Dec 5, 2017 at 03:52 UTC
On a photo in the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Astrophotography Samples sample gallery (7 comments in total)
In reply to:

huyzer: He held perfectly still for 25 seconds. Bravo.

I did! Thank you. :-)

Link | Posted on Jul 22, 2017 at 05:15 UTC
In reply to:

MedicineMan999: Wonder if infinity is at the infinity mark ???

Just slightly left of the middle of the infinity symbol. Cheers!

Link | Posted on Jul 20, 2017 at 06:04 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

JayEvans: This is a great review, and I do notice the level of aberration visible in your 10s f/1.8 image is the same as it was on my Sigma, which is disturbing if you want to be able to print your images. I didn't even see it corrected at f/2.8 putting it outside the capability of the other new contender in the marketplace so I returned it and opted for the cheaper but equally capable lens that has zero aberration at f/2.4.

Sigma has some stiff new competition in the Ultra Wide marketplace at the moment and my opinion is, they failed to deliver on their promises from the original demo images put out.

Hi Jay, it would be interesting to see at which brightness (magnitude) does the coma become a real problem. It did not bother me with stars but the distortion of Jupiter is way too much. In September I'll make some A-B comparisons with the Nikkor and report back. Thanks for your comment!

Link | Posted on Jul 20, 2017 at 02:28 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

Every Crook and Nanny: Astounding images, Jose. Been following your work since Paranal and coming from you, saying this lens is awesome means a lot regarding its optical quality.

Hi! I photographed Mauna Kea before Paranal but in Paranal was where I started doing this work more seriously so for you to bring that work is highly appreciated! Can't wait until I photograph auroras with this. Thanks for following my work! All the best!

Link | Posted on Jul 20, 2017 at 02:23 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

LDunn1: Excellent to see a comprehensive review of this lens espeecially with its strong slant towards nightscape use. Many thanks for taking the time & trouble to do this for the community.

The section on Vignetting and lens flare I've had to read multiple times, & I still 'don't get it' though. specifically these comments:-

"On site, it was apparent how much brighter the image at F2.8 appeared on the LCD screen compared to the one shot at F1.8" &

"the image at F2.8 is 27% brighter than the one at F1.8 due to the effect of vignetting"

I don't understand this at all. an image taken at f1.8 should be brighter than one at f2.8, for the same iso & shutter speed/duration. The sample photos don't seem to support these statements to my eyes either, with the f1.8 shots being brighter. Maybe I am missing something.

However, apart from the above it was great, I particularly appreciated the focus on coma, as this is often a weakness with this sort of lens & night sky work.

Many thanks!

Hi LDunn1! Sounds counterintuitive, right? The key is the following statement in the previous section:

"Next, let's take a look at another scene shot at F1.8 and stop down the lens to F2.8 in 1/3 f-stop increments while *increasing* the exposure times accordingly in order to keep the same EV."

So I am comparing F1.8 10 sec with F2.8 25 sec. The vignetting makes the F1.8 with the *corresponding* shorter exposure time look darker.

Please let me know if this clears things up. Thanks for your comments and question!

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2017 at 07:41 UTC
In reply to:

Hannu108: Several incredible shots—thanks for posting! Quite some softness in the corners at f/1.8, though.

Thank you. All the best!

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2017 at 07:19 UTC
In reply to:

Astrophotographer 10: Great images. What white balance did you use - daylight or auto?

Greg.

Thank you. Auto since I shoot RAW and then select the WB in Lightroom.

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2017 at 07:17 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

dash2k8: Pretty strong endorsement for this lens to replace the venerable Nikon. I was already sold and now have peace of mind that I made the right choice.

Without a doubt I'll continue using the Nikkor lens for astrophotography, for daytime shots when f/1.8 is not necessary, and whenever I would benefit from the focal length range but the Sigma lens will become my main lens for the Northern Lights.

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2017 at 05:48 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

Kabalyero: My Samyang 14mm f/2.8 is now crying in envy...but on a more serious note...thank you for the well rounded review. Looking forward for the aurora sequences! Cheers bro!

Thank you! Yes, I hope to write something about that experience. All the best!

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2017 at 04:17 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

WebmasterNeal: I rented the lens and tested it out last night as well. If you're going to buy it to use it at f1.8 for astro, I wouldn't recommend it as the coma too much for my liking. Like the author said, at f2.8 it was fine, but then it's in the same range as the Rokinon lenses and it's another $1,000 for this lens.
The other two issues I had was it's really heavy and with my MC-11 adapter, it eventually stopped working and my shutter stopped working for some reason with this lens after about 10 shots. I put my 14mm Rokinon on after that and it worked fine.

Thanks for the input, Matthew. Best of luck with the tests, Neal!

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2017 at 01:02 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

Boeing skipper: Excellent and complete review, thanks a lot Jose, exactly what I was looking for!

I'm glad. Thanks for reading it and sharing your opinion. All the best!

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2017 at 00:50 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

Achiron: Is the banding I see is natural? You see this green/purple hue change with other cameras/eyes? If so, is that natural?!

I think I know what you are talking about. Most prominent in image 2 of 13, right? That is airglow, a natural atmospheric phenomenon. Take a look at its wikipedia article. It's normally too faint to see with the naked eye. Cheers!

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 22:57 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

matthew saville: The coma / astigmatism looks like little gnats, which is better I suppose than the albatross wings that the 24 Art and 20 Art exhibited.

Still, considering that it's not actually flawless, I'm not liking the price tag or the weight. I'd probably stick with a Nikon 14-24, unless I truly needed the added brightness for something like video by moonlight, or a "drivelapse" etc.

I think we are getting closer but flawless it is not. When companies compete consumers win so let's see if this pushes the other companies to improve. Cheers!

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 20:24 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dan_168: Nice !!! Just can't want for my Pre-ordered Nikon Mount 14 Art to arrive, the Canon version is already available here.....waiting game continues.......if It's not here by end of the month, I will go buy the Canon version, I don't mind to own both version as I shoot multiple systems anyway, I have those Samyang in both platform too, It will be a lens to replace my 2X Samyang 14 + 2X Samyang 24 1.4, Nikon 14-24 + Zeiss Batis 18, not a bad deal at all. I do see some Coma there but where do I find another 14mm with wide open F1.8 with less Coma ????

Exactly. Have fun with all your gear. Thanks for sharing!

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 16:24 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

PBR Streetgang: Hi Jose Francisco, thanks for the article. Could you tell us what time lapse interval you used? It seems the exposures were 13 or 15 seconds, but how much time between shots? Thanks

Hi PBRS, just one second in between shots which is my standard for this kind of time-lapse sequences. That way, I can always combine them to make star trails with no big gaps in between. Cheers!

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 16:23 UTC
Total: 62, showing: 21 – 40
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