Jose Francisco Salgado

Jose Francisco Salgado

DPReview Contributor
Lives in United States Chicago, IL, United States
Works as a Astronomer and Visual Artist
Has a website at josefrancisco.org
Joined on May 11, 2016
About me:

José Francisco Salgado is an Emmy-nominated astronomer (BS in Physics, Univ. of Puerto Rico; PhD in Astronomy, Univ. of Michigan), experimental photographer, visual artist, and public speaker who creates multimedia works that communicate science in engaging ways. As the Executive Director and co-founder of KV 265, a non-profit science and arts education organization, Dr. Salgado collaborates with orchestras, composers, and musicians to present films that provoke curiosity and a sense of wonder about the Earth and the Universe.

His work was first featured on DP Review in this in-the-field feature of the Nikon D810a.

Comments

Total: 62, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

tsteinphoto: Jose, Thankyou for the fantastic review. I really appreciate the Astrophotography insight and how creative you have been with this lens. I have been looking at the Sigma 16mm, f1.4 lens for Astrophotography. Although, it is not an ART lens it has good reviews. Do you have any experience with this lens? Do you have any guides or tutorials on your astrophotography techniques? Thankyou so much again for sharing your skills.

Hi there! I decided to check on messages and found yours. Thank you for your kind words. You made me curious about the Sigma 16mm F1.4 but I see that it is for cropped sensors and all cameras I use these days are full frame. I'll be using the Sigma 20mm F1.4 Art so I should have impressions soon. I'll be writing more articles here so be on the lookout. Clear skies!

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2019 at 23:12 UTC
On article Review: Color night vision with the SiOnyx Aurora (65 comments in total)
In reply to:

John Koch: If the shutter speed can be no slower than 1.5 seconds, it presumably impairs any ability to capture time lapse of the milky way. At most latitudes there are no aurora to be seen.

Any samples of moonless night shots of people or animals? The shots of the sneaky armadillo were favored by street lighting.

Hi John. I agree with your first statement. Nevertheless, I'm looking forward to shooting video with the Galactic bulge in the background. I'm afraid that a moonless night with no auroras and with no other obvious light source (natural or artificial) will be extremely challenging for this, and many, cameras. Actually, I would like to shoot with the Moon as the only or main light source. Cheers!

Link | Posted on Nov 27, 2018 at 05:32 UTC
On article Review: Color night vision with the SiOnyx Aurora (65 comments in total)
In reply to:

gianstam: Dear DPR, thanks not only for the article/review but also because it's always wonderful to contribute with persons like JF Salgado (and many other of course).

Special thanks to Mr Salgado.

You are welcome and thank you very much for your kind words. Here's to more contributions from yours truly!

Link | Posted on Nov 25, 2018 at 23:01 UTC
On a photo in the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Astrophotography Samples sample gallery (2 comments in total)
In reply to:

Nien: Stunning. Really amazing comp.

Thank you, Nien!

Link | Posted on Nov 13, 2018 at 05:32 UTC
In reply to:

StuartABell: Chromatic Aberration is a VERY SERIOUS problem with the TG-5. The built in lens profile distributed by Olympus does not correct, even slightly, the problem.

The only correction I can see is with the Olympus provided software - a difficult to use and time consuming application that does not fit in the Lightroom workflow.

The TG-t is nearly useless for bright light outdoor images when aberration is an issue - better to use a $50 snapshot camera for this unless you can find some reasonable way to correct the Chromatic Abberation.

453C, make that two bad units because as pointed in the article the CA on the TG-5 can be severe. Yes, it can also be corrected in Lightroom. Cheers!

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2017 at 19:08 UTC
On article How to photograph the northern lights (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lensmate: Great body of work Jose. Out of curiosity, did you ever see/capture proton arcs [possibly being renamed 'Steve'- an acronym meaning “Strong Thermal Emission Velocity Enhancement”] here's an example further south, near the 49 parallel -

https://www.flickr.com/photos/photosauraus_rex/23674640958/in/dateposted/

Something that I forgot to share in my comment above, Lensmate. It is not a proton arc but thermal emission from gas which is much hotter than the surrounding gas. Cheers!

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2017 at 18:43 UTC
On article How to photograph the northern lights (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

rico7578: The most difficult part of aurora shots is the white balance setting in post-processing, but this article does not talk about that... :(

Hi Rico. As Peter pointed out, if you set the camera to RAW then in post you can choose the WB that, for example, best represents what your eyes perceived (if this is your intention). Personally, I tend to agree with my Nikon WB auto setting values but when processing a time-lapse sequences I set all exposures to the same Temp/Tint values in order to avoid color flickering. Now, what is actually difficult is to set the WB when your image contains both auroras and artificial lights. That is why it is best to avoid light pollution as much as possible. Clear skies!

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2017 at 18:37 UTC
On article How to photograph the northern lights (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ad B: Hi,

It's one of the most beautiful "events" to take photos of.
We tried it 2 years back in Northern Finland (Ivalo), but it was the whole week very cloudy. Damn, damn, damn.
Last year we went to Island, we had a little cottage in the middle of nowhere, 35 Mls above Reykjavik.
Our fireworks on New Years eve was... YES!!!
https://flic.kr/p/RPvH8K
https://flic.kr/p/REtW7V
It moved quite slowly, so it wasn't difficult to make pics.

Thanks for sharing!

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2017 at 18:27 UTC
On article How to photograph the northern lights (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

747Skipper: Great pictures, but a plea to those shooting video professionally. Don't always speed it up. I've witnessed both northern and southern lights from th3 air and they move at their own speed beautifully. So often on TV you see hours of subtle changes shoe-horned into 30 seconds.
Take your time and enjoy.
David

I agree, David. When it comes to time-lapse photography, it all comes down to how short your exposure can be which depends upon aurora brightness (which in turn is correlated to how fast the auroras change), lens aperture, and the camera's performance at high ISO. As technology advances we can take shorter and shorter exposures leading closer to real-time frame rates. I have started experimenting with real-time video and it is apparent that during some substorms slow motion photography is actually needed to show the intricacies of the phenomenon.

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2017 at 18:23 UTC
On article How to photograph the northern lights (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

MOmair: I have shot this timelapse 2 years ago in Norway Tromso.
https://youtu.be/IMFzZ3vc9P8

Good job, Muhammad! The geomagnetic activity was definitely high during your visit. Thanks for sharing!

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2017 at 18:14 UTC
In reply to:

Dante Birchen: The Nikon is worse than an average smartphone camera. The Oly is great for it's sensor size.

Yes, that was my experience regarding the Coolpix.

Link | Posted on Dec 17, 2017 at 18:45 UTC
On article How to photograph the northern lights (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

SantaFeBill: Great article, but I suggest one caution: Don't do what the photographer in the photo has done, extending the camera up by the single column. That configuration is less stable than having the camera rest directly at the top of the tripod itself.

Your last statement about stability is correct but the center column on Gitzo tripods can be safely raised if the air is still (like on that night) and the legs are completely extended (wider base). Photographers need to consider several factors but this is in no way a black-and-white situation.

Link | Posted on Dec 17, 2017 at 17:16 UTC
In reply to:

Steven Lyons: Wow, who thought it was a good editorial decision to publish a review article using Puerto Rico as a location (regardless of when the photos were shot). Much of the island likely does not exist as it is being portrayed in the photos. Many lives were lost, people are still suffering with power and water in short supply and the natural environment has been forever altered. Stunningly tone deaf.

Steven, Puerto Rico is my country of origin. My parents, extended family, and friends live on the island. If I had thought that to publish this review were insensitive I would have asked DP Review to cancel the publication altogether.

One of the things that Puerto Rico needs is visitors so its tourism and economy can recover. To treat Puerto Rico like it has disappeared would be a far greater disservice.

I'll leave you with the first two sentences of a newswire published just 5 days ago: "Puerto Rico is open for tourism as it kicks-off its winter season on December 20th and just in time for the holidays. More than 100 hotels are open and operating."
https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/puerto-rico-declares-it-is-officially-open-for-tourism-300569867.html

Finally, it was the idea of the editors to add a link to one of the relief campaigns. I thank them for their thoughtfulness!

Link | Posted on Dec 17, 2017 at 06:25 UTC
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: And how did this bit of touristing and nightsky photography aid Puerto Rico in recovery from the devastation of hurricane? Don't answer: "monies spent at the hotel went to locals"?

What did José Francisco Salgado do about restoring the electric grid, and citizen's access to potable water? If he can't say, he really shouldn't have visited PR.

Not only the word summer but you obviously missed the Editor's Note (in bold) at the top of the article as well.

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2017 at 15:02 UTC
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: And how did this bit of touristing and nightsky photography aid Puerto Rico in recovery from the devastation of hurricane? Don't answer: "monies spent at the hotel went to locals"?

What did José Francisco Salgado do about restoring the electric grid, and citizen's access to potable water? If he can't say, he really shouldn't have visited PR.

1. As the article clearly states, we visited Puerto Rico in the summer prior to (i.e., BEFORE) Hurricanes Irma and María.
2. If you need to know, we stayed at locally owned hotels.

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2017 at 14:36 UTC
On article How to photograph the northern lights (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

jande9: Beautiful pictures.
You may want to mention to people who are planning a trip to see the Northern Lights, that they should avoid dates around the full moon.
I went to Whitehorse and saw them there, but the full moon reduced their impact somewhat.
https://www.dpreview.com/galleries/0902336007/photos/3154527/aurora1

Thank you, Jande9. You are absolutely right. It is a point we could have mentioned. A little bit of moonlight can illuminate the landscape very nicely but a Full Moon will overpower the auroras. I always plan accordingly by looking at the phase of Moon and its altitude in the sky. Clear skies!

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2017 at 06:25 UTC
On article How to photograph the northern lights (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

Paul B Jones: Wonderful article. Thank you for making your knowledge available in such an accessible way. Focussing on a bright star in live view is a great tip.

I am glad that you found the article useful, Paul. Please let us know if you have any questions. Clear skies!

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2017 at 02:53 UTC
On article How to photograph the northern lights (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lensmate: Great body of work Jose. Out of curiosity, did you ever see/capture proton arcs [possibly being renamed 'Steve'- an acronym meaning “Strong Thermal Emission Velocity Enhancement”] here's an example further south, near the 49 parallel -

https://www.flickr.com/photos/photosauraus_rex/23674640958/in/dateposted/

Hi Lensmate! Thank you. I know people who have seen it in Alberta but I haven't seen it from Yellowknife. I think it has only been recently observed south of the aurora oval. Nevertheless, I briefly talked about it in this lecture I gave recently at the U. of Michigan. Clear skies!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXXxJKcL0gQ

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2017 at 01:03 UTC
On article How to photograph the northern lights (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

TheVoid: Thanks for taking the time to write this out and share your knowledge. Like many photographic techniques and experiences, this can seem simple at first glance, but the wide disparity in quality of Aurora photos "out there" proves again that experience and practice, not just gear and knowledge, will make a better outcome. Planning and luck are necessary for the best conditions I assume. I appreciate your discussion about focusing here. I think that's the part a lot of novices are getting wrong - so much color in the sky can overwhelm a photographer and make them rush through frame after frame, afraid to miss the spectacle, only to find later that the focus was not carefully tuned for maximum sharpness.

Maybe one day I'll get the chance to be the novice, learn from my mistakes, and eventually get some great aurora shots of my own. Thanks again for your knowledge so I can use it when that day comes.

Thank you for sharing your perspective. It was a pleasure to share our knowledge. Feel free to ask us for advice. Clear skies!

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2017 at 23:26 UTC
On article How to photograph the northern lights (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cato Kristiansen: As someone living in what is classified as middle latitudes, I regularly see northern lights. Of course, not as often as those who live further north, but often several times per month. The season is between late August to end of March. The area I live in is quite light-contaminated. Norway's capital city, Oslo lies to the north, about 40 mi / 60km. Despite this, it is quite possible to take pictures of the Northern Lights, even with a 6 year old APS-C camera. I have uploaded some to Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/62257300@N02/

I think the need for dark skies is exaggerated. The northern lights are much more powerful than the stars. In Scandinavia, where you do not have to go far out of a city to get good conditions, much better than in my Flickr photos.

As net1994 pointed out, pics of Aurora itself look alike and they need a foreground. The west coast of Norway is full of dramatic scenery that will make great forground to the Aurora.

Hi Cato. Yes, you can see the auroras with some light pollution. The biggest problem will is when clouds in your composition reflect artificial lights. This will make color balance more difficult to deal with (even when post-processing RAW images) and personally, I think it looks hideous. It's a matter of personal taste but a general rule of thumb when enjoying the night sky is to stay away from artificial lights as much as possible. Clear skies!

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2017 at 23:23 UTC
Total: 62, showing: 1 – 20
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