Jose Francisco Salgado

Jose Francisco Salgado

DPReview Contributor
Lives in United States Chicago, IL, United States
Works as a Astronomer and Visual Artist
Has a website at josefrancisco.org
Joined on May 11, 2016
About me:

José Francisco Salgado is an Emmy-nominated astronomer (BS in Physics, Univ. of Puerto Rico; PhD in Astronomy, Univ. of Michigan), experimental photographer, visual artist, and public speaker who creates multimedia works that communicate science in engaging ways. As the Executive Director and co-founder of KV 265, a non-profit science and arts education organization, Dr. Salgado collaborates with orchestras, composers, and musicians to present films that provoke curiosity and a sense of wonder about the Earth and the Universe.

His work was first featured on DP Review in this in-the-field feature of the Nikon D810a.

Comments

Total: 71, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Lan: Thank you for posting that; an interesting look at a device I never knew existed!

Do you have any timelapses taken with it, but not in split screen?

Lan, check out the developer's videos at: https://vimeo.com/elijahparker/videos/

Link | Posted on Feb 19, 2020 at 02:46 UTC
In reply to:

matthew saville: The bulk of this article reads more like a promotion than a review, but I did notice a few "What we'd like to see improved" items at the very end. Unfortunately, the final Pros/Cons didn't answer the few questions I had:

First, can this device just set exposure only, not fire the shutter, so a separate motion timelapse system can control the interval and triggering?

Is it limited to 1/3 EV increments, or can it take advantage of the smaller increments that have become possible in recent years, namely with auto-ISO and exposure fine-tuning on certain cameras? (Some Nikons' built-in timelapse features have extremely smooth exposure transitions, because they go beyond 1/3 EV increments now.)

Maybe I missed this, but can you view the most recent histogram and/or a blinking highlight warning on the device, and not just a thumbnail image?

Can you ramp the interval, from, say, 5 sec at around sunset, and then smoothly transition to 35 sec intervals after astronomical twilight?

@Radek P. Thank you very much. I'm glad you enjoyed it!
@Matthew saville. You are welcome!
@Elijah Parker. Thanks for the additional information.

Link | Posted on Feb 19, 2020 at 02:44 UTC
In reply to:

kkoba: Small error in article: that's not a Micro-B USB port.

The Micro-B USB mentioned in the article is for charging the unit and it is not the one pictured in the photos above.

Link | Posted on Feb 19, 2020 at 02:39 UTC
In reply to:

Lan: Thank you for posting that; an interesting look at a device I never knew existed!

Do you have any timelapses taken with it, but not in split screen?

You are welcome, Lan. Thank you very much! I'm currently traveling but I should be able to add the Devils Tower sequence in full screen.

Link | Posted on Feb 18, 2020 at 03:10 UTC
In reply to:

Gesture: Excellent article.

I am glad you thought so, Gesture. It was a long article but I enjoyed sharing my experience using both components. All the best!

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2020 at 21:41 UTC
In reply to:

matthew saville: The bulk of this article reads more like a promotion than a review, but I did notice a few "What we'd like to see improved" items at the very end. Unfortunately, the final Pros/Cons didn't answer the few questions I had:

First, can this device just set exposure only, not fire the shutter, so a separate motion timelapse system can control the interval and triggering?

Is it limited to 1/3 EV increments, or can it take advantage of the smaller increments that have become possible in recent years, namely with auto-ISO and exposure fine-tuning on certain cameras? (Some Nikons' built-in timelapse features have extremely smooth exposure transitions, because they go beyond 1/3 EV increments now.)

Maybe I missed this, but can you view the most recent histogram and/or a blinking highlight warning on the device, and not just a thumbnail image?

Can you ramp the interval, from, say, 5 sec at around sunset, and then smoothly transition to 35 sec intervals after astronomical twilight?

Hi Matthew. The review is not sponsored and it is based on me using it for actual work in a 2-year period. I'm sorry that some of your questions remained unanswered so I'll address them here to the best of my knowledge: (1) I did not use it with a motion control system but if the developer reads this he might provide additional information on this subject, (2) my understanding is that the smallest increment at this point is 1/3 EV, (3) see page 2 of this article for an app screenshot of thumbnail images and histograms, and (4) you can in an indirect way, you set the day and night intervals and the device will maximize the exposure time while keeping the ISO value low. Thank you very much for your comments and questions.

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2020 at 21:38 UTC
In reply to:

geekyrocketguy: Is this a sponsored post? The article reads like an advertisement.

Hi Sean. If it reads like one it is because after using these tools for 2 years they have proven to be great for my job and I wanted to explain in detail what it could do for others. Hence, the review/how-to nature of the article. Let me know if you have any questions about these tools. All the best!

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2020 at 21:00 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (88 comments in total)
In reply to:

primeshooter: Nice review here, I am just waiting on mine to arrive. I recon this will be a great lens alongside my other f/1.4 20, 24, and 50mm lens for astro. Because some times I don't want to moisaic every night sky shot! ;-)

Thank you. I hope you get great results!

Link | Posted on Sep 7, 2019 at 07:40 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (88 comments in total)
In reply to:

Deadthor132: Hey Jose. Awesome read. You mind me asking you a question on this? I’m a newbie to astro photography. Well I’ve always been at peace and kind of had an interested with stars, planets and the moon. However just recently started reading as much as I could on the subject (BTW thank you). So I was reading https://www.photographytalk.com/astrophotography-tips-for-beginners and picked up a Canon 60D. In that article they speak about reference a Nikon D850 and Canon t7i. What about a Canon 60D, did I make a good choice? Also what’s your opinion on star trackers? Speaking of which, which has the shortest learning curve?

I am glad you enjoyed the article! The ISO range of the Nikon D850 can be extended more than the range of those two Canon models but I'm sure that you will be able to take great astrophotographs, especially when combined with fast lenses like the one reviewed here. In terms of star trackers, I use the Vixen Polarie Star Tracker. It is is very easy to use and I'm pleased with the results so I recommend it. Clear skies!

Link | Posted on Sep 7, 2019 at 07:40 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (88 comments in total)
In reply to:

tsteinphoto: Jose, Thankyou for the fantastic review. I really appreciate the Astrophotography insight and how creative you have been with this lens. I have been looking at the Sigma 16mm, f1.4 lens for Astrophotography. Although, it is not an ART lens it has good reviews. Do you have any experience with this lens? Do you have any guides or tutorials on your astrophotography techniques? Thankyou so much again for sharing your skills.

Hi there! I decided to check on messages and found yours. Thank you for your kind words. You made me curious about the Sigma 16mm F1.4 but I see that it is for cropped sensors and all cameras I use these days are full frame. I'll be using the Sigma 20mm F1.4 Art so I should have impressions soon. I'll be writing more articles here so be on the lookout. Clear skies!

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2019 at 23:12 UTC
On article Review: Color night vision with the SiOnyx Aurora (65 comments in total)
In reply to:

John Koch: If the shutter speed can be no slower than 1.5 seconds, it presumably impairs any ability to capture time lapse of the milky way. At most latitudes there are no aurora to be seen.

Any samples of moonless night shots of people or animals? The shots of the sneaky armadillo were favored by street lighting.

Hi John. I agree with your first statement. Nevertheless, I'm looking forward to shooting video with the Galactic bulge in the background. I'm afraid that a moonless night with no auroras and with no other obvious light source (natural or artificial) will be extremely challenging for this, and many, cameras. Actually, I would like to shoot with the Moon as the only or main light source. Cheers!

Link | Posted on Nov 27, 2018 at 05:32 UTC
On article Review: Color night vision with the SiOnyx Aurora (65 comments in total)
In reply to:

gianstam: Dear DPR, thanks not only for the article/review but also because it's always wonderful to contribute with persons like JF Salgado (and many other of course).

Special thanks to Mr Salgado.

You are welcome and thank you very much for your kind words. Here's to more contributions from yours truly!

Link | Posted on Nov 25, 2018 at 23:01 UTC
On a photo in the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Astrophotography Samples sample gallery (2 comments in total)
In reply to:

Nien: Stunning. Really amazing comp.

Thank you, Nien!

Link | Posted on Nov 13, 2018 at 05:32 UTC
In reply to:

StuartABell: Chromatic Aberration is a VERY SERIOUS problem with the TG-5. The built in lens profile distributed by Olympus does not correct, even slightly, the problem.

The only correction I can see is with the Olympus provided software - a difficult to use and time consuming application that does not fit in the Lightroom workflow.

The TG-t is nearly useless for bright light outdoor images when aberration is an issue - better to use a $50 snapshot camera for this unless you can find some reasonable way to correct the Chromatic Abberation.

453C, make that two bad units because as pointed in the article the CA on the TG-5 can be severe. Yes, it can also be corrected in Lightroom. Cheers!

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2017 at 19:08 UTC
On article How to photograph the northern lights (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lensmate: Great body of work Jose. Out of curiosity, did you ever see/capture proton arcs [possibly being renamed 'Steve'- an acronym meaning “Strong Thermal Emission Velocity Enhancement”] here's an example further south, near the 49 parallel -

https://www.flickr.com/photos/photosauraus_rex/23674640958/in/dateposted/

Something that I forgot to share in my comment above, Lensmate. It is not a proton arc but thermal emission from gas which is much hotter than the surrounding gas. Cheers!

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2017 at 18:43 UTC
On article How to photograph the northern lights (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

rico7578: The most difficult part of aurora shots is the white balance setting in post-processing, but this article does not talk about that... :(

Hi Rico. As Peter pointed out, if you set the camera to RAW then in post you can choose the WB that, for example, best represents what your eyes perceived (if this is your intention). Personally, I tend to agree with my Nikon WB auto setting values but when processing a time-lapse sequences I set all exposures to the same Temp/Tint values in order to avoid color flickering. Now, what is actually difficult is to set the WB when your image contains both auroras and artificial lights. That is why it is best to avoid light pollution as much as possible. Clear skies!

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2017 at 18:37 UTC
On article How to photograph the northern lights (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ad B: Hi,

It's one of the most beautiful "events" to take photos of.
We tried it 2 years back in Northern Finland (Ivalo), but it was the whole week very cloudy. Damn, damn, damn.
Last year we went to Island, we had a little cottage in the middle of nowhere, 35 Mls above Reykjavik.
Our fireworks on New Years eve was... YES!!!
https://flic.kr/p/RPvH8K
https://flic.kr/p/REtW7V
It moved quite slowly, so it wasn't difficult to make pics.

Thanks for sharing!

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2017 at 18:27 UTC
On article How to photograph the northern lights (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

747Skipper: Great pictures, but a plea to those shooting video professionally. Don't always speed it up. I've witnessed both northern and southern lights from th3 air and they move at their own speed beautifully. So often on TV you see hours of subtle changes shoe-horned into 30 seconds.
Take your time and enjoy.
David

I agree, David. When it comes to time-lapse photography, it all comes down to how short your exposure can be which depends upon aurora brightness (which in turn is correlated to how fast the auroras change), lens aperture, and the camera's performance at high ISO. As technology advances we can take shorter and shorter exposures leading closer to real-time frame rates. I have started experimenting with real-time video and it is apparent that during some substorms slow motion photography is actually needed to show the intricacies of the phenomenon.

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2017 at 18:23 UTC
On article How to photograph the northern lights (80 comments in total)
In reply to:

MOmair: I have shot this timelapse 2 years ago in Norway Tromso.
https://youtu.be/IMFzZ3vc9P8

Good job, Muhammad! The geomagnetic activity was definitely high during your visit. Thanks for sharing!

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2017 at 18:14 UTC
In reply to:

Dante Birchen: The Nikon is worse than an average smartphone camera. The Oly is great for it's sensor size.

Yes, that was my experience regarding the Coolpix.

Link | Posted on Dec 17, 2017 at 18:45 UTC
Total: 71, showing: 1 – 20
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