DMillier

Lives in United Kingdom london, United Kingdom
Joined on Aug 5, 2001

Comments

Total: 94, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »

I noticed Jupiter was peeking out between 2 of the neighbour's houses last night (a rare clear sky). I grabbed my Skymax 127 Mak and had a quick look. A 5mm wide yellow blob with one faint line discernible that swam in an out of focus constantly. 3 nice moons all in a line, though.

The reality of amateur astronomy compared to these Hubble photos kind of makes it pointless until you read a story like this.

Link | Posted on Sep 17, 2021 at 16:27 UTC as 34th comment | 6 replies

I'm keener on the shots spotted out in the world using a good photographic eye, than the abstract stock-style shots that are contrived from scratch/imagination in the studio. I always feel that, as clever and imaginative as they can be, those studio shots sit more in the realm of graphic design than photography. Just my taste, I suppose.

Link | Posted on Aug 25, 2021 at 09:21 UTC as 7th comment
In reply to:

MikeRan: ………

Waiting for the conspiracy arguments…. In 3, 2, 1, …

@craig from nevada

The main bodies in the solar system fall into 4 groups sharing similar features:

Inner rocky bodies Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars
Outer gas worlds Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune
Kuiper belt icy bodies

Pluto was the first Kuiper object discovered, long before the nature of the Kuiper belt was understood.

Recently there has been an avalanche of similar worlds discovered starting with Eris, Makemake, Haumea. There are potentially millions of these small worlds in the belt. Along with small bodies in the asteroid belt they are thought to be remnants of the formation of the solar system and hold vital clues to that process.

Scientists were faced with a choice of an ever expanding list of planets as more are found or rationalising the system. They chose to rationalise the system by demoting Pluto to be the first of the Kuiper belt discoveries. It may annoy people who learned 9 planets as small boys but the alternative is a solar system of thousands+ of planets.

Link | Posted on Jul 31, 2021 at 11:33 UTC
In reply to:

Ruby Rod: Not an f-ing clue how to even use this in Windows. Doesn't understand/expose the Windows file system. No doubt I'll figure it out eventually but why would one bother when there are great inexpensive editors like Affinity and Luminar. It doesn't print so get Qimage, which can also do a certain amount of editing. I'm a big fan of open source and shareware but these Linux ports just aren't mainstream. But pay no attention- I don't like GIMP either.

I would say the same about photoshop. It is unintuitive and impossible to use. But somehow millions of people have bitten the bullet and learned to use it.

One approach (the one I use) is (now that you can entirely customise modules into different panels), to strip it down and simplify it to a small number of processing modules. Hide all the complicated stuff until you know how to use it. It seems a lot less scary when you are using 10 modules rather than 50.

I have a dual boot machine with windows and ubuntu. I have darktable installs on both and the neat thing is because the edits are saved in sidecar files, you can easily keep the two versions in synch. I think of the ubuntu as the master but because the computer is also the family computer, I can leave it on windows, edit in windows, then when I get the chance to boot into Ubuntu, I can work on the same files because the windows edits also synch to the Ubuntu version. Very convenient.

Link | Posted on Jul 7, 2021 at 19:00 UTC
In reply to:

photoaddict: I want it "compared to..." to today's consumer Nikon camera!

Forget comparing to Nikon cameras, just compare to google streetview!

https://www.google.com/maps/@50.8248474,-0.1395936,3a,75y,198.93h,88.87t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sI0dsL-MX5As1ejsQFFUNww!2e0!7i16384!8i8192

Link | Posted on Jul 6, 2021 at 21:51 UTC

I still have my first digital camera, a slightly newer Coolpix 950 which I got back in '99, I think. It's in pristine condition and can still take decent pics, including IR with an appropriate filter.

Link | Posted on Jul 6, 2021 at 21:47 UTC as 26th comment
In reply to:

Raist3d: I think a Foveon FfF will come out 2024 or 2025- and no sooner.

Barring any other sensor tech, I do think they will try to make it. Photon counting sensor are still years away but May make everything we know now obsolete.

To quote Ricardo: "Photon counting sensor are still years away but May make everything we know now obsolete."

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2021 at 21:36 UTC
In reply to:

Raist3d: I think a Foveon FfF will come out 2024 or 2025- and no sooner.

Barring any other sensor tech, I do think they will try to make it. Photon counting sensor are still years away but May make everything we know now obsolete.

What about Eric Fossum's QIS technology?

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2021 at 17:17 UTC
In reply to:

David Rosser: I know I should have kept my Leica M4 kit (M4 and 3 lenses) but I sold it in early 1970s to fund expanding my Nikon outfit. Ah well 😠😢
Dave

Have you seen his pictures? Lots of blurriness...

Link | Posted on May 20, 2021 at 18:29 UTC
In reply to:

ch71: Pictures displayed remind me of those weirdish mushy shots tricked with Cokin filters in the 80s. Not my taste, and I'm not sure if anyone who purchases this will use it more than twice.... But, well, anyone's choice.

But what bothers me is the claim it gives true medium format effect !!
NO !!
That's lying to customers and to your audience ! 😠

Ch71

i understand the limitations, but for those occasions where stitching is viable, I can't see any reason why it won't produce a MF look. There is no difference between one shot MF and simulated multishot MF in terms of what the image looks like as long as nothing moves.

Link | Posted on May 19, 2021 at 12:22 UTC
In reply to:

ch71: Pictures displayed remind me of those weirdish mushy shots tricked with Cokin filters in the 80s. Not my taste, and I'm not sure if anyone who purchases this will use it more than twice.... But, well, anyone's choice.

But what bothers me is the claim it gives true medium format effect !!
NO !!
That's lying to customers and to your audience ! 😠

I still don't understand you. The difference between 35mm and medium format is that the MF sensor has a larger area. Flat stitching simulates the larger area by shooting 4 quarters which are then stitched together to create a MF sized frame. The end result should look exactly like a single frame from MF. If you disagree please explain (technically) why this is not true. I can see no reason why it it isn't true. There are specialist photographers the world over similating large format by stitching FF and MF images into larger frames using technical cameras with stitching backs. This is just another specialised way of achieving this.

Link | Posted on May 18, 2021 at 18:10 UTC
In reply to:

DMillier: I have a Mir-38B 65mm medium format lens that is fitted to an Arax shift adaptor. The shift adaptor has a Nikon F mount. The shift adaptor also rotates around click stops.

If i fit this to a A7rii, I will have a shifted 65mm MF lens on a rotating adaptor.

Is this effectively the same thing as the Vertex?

I can rotate my camera by 90 degree increments on my arax adaptor.

Link | Posted on May 18, 2021 at 15:34 UTC
In reply to:

ch71: Pictures displayed remind me of those weirdish mushy shots tricked with Cokin filters in the 80s. Not my taste, and I'm not sure if anyone who purchases this will use it more than twice.... But, well, anyone's choice.

But what bothers me is the claim it gives true medium format effect !!
NO !!
That's lying to customers and to your audience ! 😠

Why wouldn't it?

Link | Posted on May 18, 2021 at 15:33 UTC

I have a Mir-38B 65mm medium format lens that is fitted to an Arax shift adaptor. The shift adaptor has a Nikon F mount. The shift adaptor also rotates around click stops.

If i fit this to a A7rii, I will have a shifted 65mm MF lens on a rotating adaptor.

Is this effectively the same thing as the Vertex?

Link | Posted on May 18, 2021 at 10:29 UTC as 14th comment | 3 replies
On article Sony introduces compact FE 14mm F1.8 GM ultra-wide lens (212 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: While the term is relative, that's not what I'd call "compact".

to my mind the term "compact" goes out of its way to make a point about small size - to which I expect a 200g lens that's 2 inches long. But that's just me, old fashioned. The modern breed of high quality lenses means that a 50mm f/2 that is smaller than a 400mm tele is considered "compact" even when in 1975 it would have been called "huge". I have a couple of Contax G primes i would call compact. They have 46mm filter threads. Including the tele lens. Times are a-changing...

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2021 at 16:25 UTC
On article Sony introduces compact FE 14mm F1.8 GM ultra-wide lens (212 comments in total)
In reply to:

babart: I'm sure this is an excellent lens, but it s NOT compact.

It's certainly a lot bigger than my 6.5mm Meike :-) :-) :-)

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2021 at 16:20 UTC
In reply to:

bdbender4: "Perseverance recently released the launch lock on its onboard Ingenuity helicopter, which is a momentous occasion and a big accomplishment for the team."

Oh puh-leeze. Just do it. "Momentous"? It's taking a month +/- just to set the darn thing on the ground and push the go button. After all the hyperventilating PR it's going to be a bit unfortunate (but mildly amusing) if it just slowly topples over with inadequate lift.

If you were the project manager, would you leap into action with a coffee in one hand and casually jab the button? Oops, boss, broke it, sorry, I'll call Amazon and get a replacement.

Be more reasonable and less impatient.

Link | Posted on Apr 1, 2021 at 06:29 UTC
In reply to:

snapa: Wow, all that time, money, engineering, R&D to take pictures of brown dirt. To think if all of those resources could have been spent on taking care of more important issues one earth. Sometimes it makes me wonder what some people think are more important.

Do you really think the money that is spent on research you don't consider a priority would have been specifically targeted to something you do think is a priority? It's not like there isn't plenty of money sitting in offshore accounts doing the world no good at all, is there? And if you got your way, where do you think we would be now? Still living in the tech and scientific equivalent of the 16th century. And you wouldn't be posting messages like this on the internet. Research is the foundation for civilisation.

And even if the cash had been redirected, do you think the amounts involved would be more than a drop in the ocean in the big scheme of things?

And it's not like the cash has vanished to Mars with the rover. It's been paid to suppliers and employees who circulate it back into the economy via their purchases.

Link | Posted on Apr 1, 2021 at 06:26 UTC
On article DPReview TV: Sigma fp L first impressions (160 comments in total)
In reply to:

41mm: SIGMA, the philosophy of AIZU, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fdF3RG0DDYw is about handmade and crafted by passion and not for the New York Stock Exchange. It is private, family based and the products are not for the mass market. There are a lot of companies who have to grow and grow and grow. SIGMA is different. Think differently. Let the company alone – they know what they are doing - for sure. Thanks to the CEO Mister Kazuto Yamaki. And for the rest, there are SONY, CANON, NIKON, and so on. That is fine for ALL.

Take it or leave it. Thats the way for luckiness.

And the SONY A7IV has no Director's viewfinder mode. Just ONE example.

Take care, stay safe and have fun

Post Scriptum https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MkXGjp8uxAM

I get you are a fan and you like all that business philosophy stuff but at the end of the day, it's a camera in a competitive market and it clearly has a bunch of inconveniences and irritations that some other cameras don't. It will live or die by its practicality, not its philosophical underpinnings. I can see it could be a reasonably effective camera and it has a good sensor, but other models just seem to come without all the caveats and inconveniences. Sorry, I think it is yet another Sigma mis-step. The SD10 was good, though.

Link | Posted on Mar 27, 2021 at 22:02 UTC
In reply to:

LHMF: Same studio as 1969?
No, just kidding. It's good that the moon becomes more intresting by research. After the Apollo-Programm there was the ISS etc. in the center of astronautics and then landing on mars. But I think the moon was a bit neglected.

I'll offer a Pascalian variation on this: Why not just accept it at face value? That way, there is science to learn. Even if conspiracy theorists' favourite targets one day turn out in some extraordinarily unlikely turn of events to be have been true, so what? The ridiculous amount of energy exerted supporting these theories would still be a ridiculous - years of your life wasted just so you can say "Told you so". Better to just go with the science. I am highly confident that conspiracy theories are so much nonsense, but even for the believers it's an appalling waste of time and energy with nothing to gain. Spend the time learning physics instead. Or photography.

Link | Posted on Dec 4, 2020 at 15:46 UTC
Total: 94, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »