Fotogeneticist

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Mar 27, 2011

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On article Nikon dominates World Press Photo 2018 camera breakdown (388 comments in total)

Wow, D700 still representing! I got my first magazine cover with my now dead D700. What a workhorse!

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2018 at 09:11 UTC as 16th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Fotogeneticist: Long time Nikon user here only because I'm more busy shooting than worrying about the "market". It takes about 2 generations or more improvement for upgrades to be worth it for me. Started with D100 and kept it until the D700 came out, and I only upgraded to a D750 last month. When my D700 was considered outdated, I took a photo that made 2 magazine covers, a service wide calendar cover, and had other photos published in various community publications. But really, there are more "market experts" here on these forums than photographers. In the end, it's the photographers who decide what camera is the best. Don't listen to market experts, but rather photographers who actually use cameras. That being said, I've always known that there is a natural tendency toward higher capability, smaller form factor. Phone cameras will one day make even FF cameras obsolete. I only use my DSLR nowadays when I need extremely shallow DOF or single frame low light photos. That could change one day.

I've been spoiled by my leaf shutter cameras. My Ricoh GR-D allows me to use fill flash in harsh midday light. I bought an old D50 solely because of it's high speed flash synch up to 1/500 sec for the same capability. I like to use wide apertures to get bright, creamy backgrounds with fill flash in the middle of the day. I used to have to use ND filters to do the same. It's just a look that I like.

Link | Posted on Jan 25, 2018 at 11:29 UTC
In reply to:

rhlpetrus: I wished the news report included the actual sales figures n units, and a comparison to Dec 2016’s data. The news is expected, and maybe the diff between Nikon and Sony was just very small. Can’t DPR buy the report and publish such figures here?

Anyway, well done Nikon, the D850 is indeed an awesome camera, likely the best ever made when all aspects are taken into account. As a Nikon dslr user, I hope they keep it on track, release a good ML system soon, and concentrate on quality photographic items. That’s their long time tradition, including optics, their original activity, which brought them world-wide recognition whe DD Duncan first put a Nikkor on his Leica IIIc rf back in 1950, to cover the Korean war.

Here’s an interesting read with a Nikkor 5cm on a IIIc, from a Leica site:

http://leicaphilia.com/tag/david-douglas-duncan/

Only people who don't know any better get compact cameras these days. Phone cameras are smaller, have equally if not better IQ, and they incur no extra cost. Nikon probably needs to get out of the compact camera business gracefully. The only good compact camera would be a jean front hip pocketable FF (or APS-C) camera like the Ricoh GR series. That gives you something an iPhone can't (yet).

Link | Posted on Jan 24, 2018 at 15:06 UTC
In reply to:

Eddie G963: Kudos to Nikon in creating the blockbuster 850 it is truly an amazing camera!!! I wish Canon who I'm using for a number of years would wake up and listen.

They will, and then Nikon will answer Canon's blockbuster, and then Canon will create another. In that time period, either those who don't know anything about how to take good photos or those that are so good at it and make enough money to afford the marginally best will have swapped brands several times. Meanwhile, those who choose to focus on things like learning composition and lighting will not worry about these things and get equally improved results. It takes me between two and three updates of photography products (doubling of resolution with twice better high ISO is my standard) before I even consider updating or switching.

Link | Posted on Jan 24, 2018 at 14:55 UTC
In reply to:

Fotogeneticist: Long time Nikon user here only because I'm more busy shooting than worrying about the "market". It takes about 2 generations or more improvement for upgrades to be worth it for me. Started with D100 and kept it until the D700 came out, and I only upgraded to a D750 last month. When my D700 was considered outdated, I took a photo that made 2 magazine covers, a service wide calendar cover, and had other photos published in various community publications. But really, there are more "market experts" here on these forums than photographers. In the end, it's the photographers who decide what camera is the best. Don't listen to market experts, but rather photographers who actually use cameras. That being said, I've always known that there is a natural tendency toward higher capability, smaller form factor. Phone cameras will one day make even FF cameras obsolete. I only use my DSLR nowadays when I need extremely shallow DOF or single frame low light photos. That could change one day.

I forgot to mention... DSLRs are still not obsolete yet also due to high speed flash sync. But again, maybe that will change too one day.

Link | Posted on Jan 24, 2018 at 14:41 UTC
In reply to:

Focus Shift Shooting: This is very good news for Nikon, who needed a boost after restructuring. Their D850 gamble really did well. 5 Months from release and it's still sold out.

The Mirrorless Z-Mount might be their golden ticket, and now they stand tall enough to make that effort. Good luck Nikon! Well deserved.

Mirrorless Z-Mount needs to include an F-Mount adapter with it. Otherwise, it probably wouldn't be small enough to replace my DSLR. But for others not already invested in DSLRs, it just may be the thing they're looking for. Actually, there's one thing I might upgrade for... high speed flash sync. If Z-Mount enables a high speed flash sync (1/500 sec or higher like my D50 and Ricoh GR) then I just might go for it. For me, that's the game changer.

Link | Posted on Jan 24, 2018 at 12:30 UTC

Long time Nikon user here only because I'm more busy shooting than worrying about the "market". It takes about 2 generations or more improvement for upgrades to be worth it for me. Started with D100 and kept it until the D700 came out, and I only upgraded to a D750 last month. When my D700 was considered outdated, I took a photo that made 2 magazine covers, a service wide calendar cover, and had other photos published in various community publications. But really, there are more "market experts" here on these forums than photographers. In the end, it's the photographers who decide what camera is the best. Don't listen to market experts, but rather photographers who actually use cameras. That being said, I've always known that there is a natural tendency toward higher capability, smaller form factor. Phone cameras will one day make even FF cameras obsolete. I only use my DSLR nowadays when I need extremely shallow DOF or single frame low light photos. That could change one day.

Link | Posted on Jan 24, 2018 at 11:51 UTC as 47th comment | 4 replies

The main problem with the DL series is that it was an attempt to make multiple cameras for different lenses rather than a single camera that could accept multiple lenses. Just by the nature of that logic, it would have to cost more to develop. The interchangeable lens concept is already tried and tested. The only way a DL system would be successful as a camera in and of itself is if the DL were significantly smaller and lighter than an interchangeable lens camera with the respective lens attached. Also, the price of buying all 3 DLs would have to be cheaper than buying the equivalent interchangeable lens camera body with all 3 lenses, minus some weighted percentage given the smaller size of the sensor as compared to a full frame or APS-C sized sensor. It's simple math.

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2017 at 07:20 UTC as 109th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

John Roy: Nikon's handling of the one inch sensor cameras should have provoked mass seppuku among the managers responsible for the fiasco. It has been incompetence from start to finish.
I was looking forward to upgrading my V2 but the V3 came out with a detachable EVF and the deal-breaker: Micro-SD cards. So I still have my V2 and it's looking very very old.

I agree that the handling of the one-inch sensor cameras has been sad, especially given the great potential. The V series should have a low profile EVF (like the original V1 that I still shoot with). But I see the detachable EVF as an elegant solution except for the hotshoe flash issue.

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2017 at 07:09 UTC

We need to stop using the term "mirrorless" to name these latest cameras. Imagine if we called cars "horseless carriages". The image follows a different path from the scene to the sensor to the finder. We used to call cameras with two lenses Twin Lens Reflex. Then Hasselblad ushered in the Single Lens Reflex. I propose Digital Sensor Reflex (DSR). The image goes directly to the sensor through the lens and the sensor "reflexes" the image to the finder. TLR --> SLR --> DSLR --> DSR.

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2016 at 14:40 UTC as 81st comment | 6 replies
On article Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (807 comments in total)

1/2000 sec flash synch! That's what I'm talking about. I'm a flash synch snob. Leaf or electronic shutters, all the way! Fill flash in broad daylight without ND filters. You don't know what you're missing if you don't know what I'm talking about. Name a FF DSLR that can do that. Not that many.

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 07:22 UTC as 138th comment | 3 replies
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1175 comments in total)

Congratulations Hasselblad! First to realize the first rule of good camera design: sensor size to camera size. Who would have ever imagined a medium format camera that's smaller than a 35mm format camera?

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 16:36 UTC as 159th comment
On article Hasselblad to announce 'game changer' next week (454 comments in total)
In reply to:

Fotogeneticist: Go back to the roots of what made Hasselblad popular in the first place... MODULARITY.

Imagine a compact, modular sensor/lens/drive/finder camera with a medium format sized sensor. That's what I dream of.

Link | Posted on Jun 18, 2016 at 08:29 UTC
On article Hasselblad to announce 'game changer' next week (454 comments in total)

Go back to the roots of what made Hasselblad popular in the first place... MODULARITY.

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2016 at 20:21 UTC as 212th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Spectro: I have my share of P&S and smaller cameras and I just don't use them. It is either cellphone or FF for me. Gave away my panny gm1 because I just didn't use it enough and the nikon s1 (has an underwater case so why I kept it) is sitting around as with other P&S I gave away. The old S1's aptiva sensor is crap (worst sensor to grace nikkor lens) also, glad nikon went with with sony's BSI. Got to admit the 18-50 looks cool (too much for me now), maybe it will cause a j5 fire sale which I am interested in for hike (plus small telephoto lens).

That's only because the "small" P&S cameras are not small enough. Small enough means it can fit in your hip pocket. If you don't think there's a high quality P&S that can do this, just check out the Ricoh GR. It fits in my right hip pocket of my jeans but the quality from it is APS-C. Small is not small enough unless it's pocketable. If it's not pocketable, you may as well have a full frame camera.

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2016 at 10:38 UTC

Now make it with a CX mount and we'll finally have what we've been waiting for since the first V1 came out. Finally, Speedlight compatibility.

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2016 at 10:34 UTC as 30th comment
On article Pocketable APS-C: Fujifilm X70 real-world samples (218 comments in total)
In reply to:

Fotogeneticist: It's great to finally see a competitor to the Ricoh GR series. High image quality to camera size ratio. The Ricoh GR has been the only truly pocketable APS-C for years. I use mine for street photography as well as while I am cycling.

I looked at the Nikon CP A (as a long time Nikon user since the days of film), however, the customizability to facilitate the fastest operation for the controllable factors of exposure (shutter speed, aperture, ISO, ND filter, flash) were not there. On the other hand, my Ricoh allows me near instantaneous manipulation similar to my DSLR, but much smaller. Ricoh's interface is amazing and a result of listening to customer feedback. Ricoh can also go against the grain without worrying much through the creation of this excellent niche product. Next step should be full frame. Ultimately, it's all about IQ to camera size ratio. Find the innate quality of something and measure that against the innate utility factor (which is mainly "pocketability"--think how iPhone cameras are making compact cameras obsolete. That is the natural measure of progress of something. The first to understand this and get there wins.

Link | Posted on Feb 12, 2016 at 12:20 UTC
On article Pocketable APS-C: Fujifilm X70 real-world samples (218 comments in total)

It's great to finally see a competitor to the Ricoh GR series. High image quality to camera size ratio. The Ricoh GR has been the only truly pocketable APS-C for years. I use mine for street photography as well as while I am cycling.

Link | Posted on Feb 11, 2016 at 12:14 UTC as 9th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

TomasT: After 3 years it is still the smallest with an APS-C sensor.
And perhaps de sharpest. I just bought one!

If you think of cameras in terms of image quality (i.e., mainly sensor size) to camera size ratio, the Ricoh GR and GRII have little competition. I've owned the Ricoh GRD, GRDII, and the GR. Unlike some of the dinosaurs here, I'd rather like to see a full frame GRIII (as long as small size and max aperture are not compromised). I stopped upgrading my GRDs until the GR came out solely for that reason. Sony and Fuji understand this formula as well. Leica understood it way back when. It is where camera design naturally gravitates toward for mainstream use.

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2016 at 19:35 UTC
On article Video: Cristina Mittermeier delivers PIX 2015 keynote (51 comments in total)
In reply to:

Tronhar: I got two things out of this video: neither of which have anything to do with what equipment she uses or how well known she may or may not be. The significance of her messages is in their veracity.

1. I know we will not not destroy our planet, but it will change to the point where life as we know it will no longer be sustainable, and that is a tragedy for all species including our own. Denying that, or hoping someone else will sort it is not a solution and we all have a part to play.

2. Not only is a picture worth a thousand words, it does it in a hundred languages. There is a wealth of data on climate change, and there is no debate among 98% of scientists that we are in the middle of it. But the average person is not swayed with tables and graphs, they are moved by images showing these events in action. One such effort by James Balog in his series, Chasing Ice, shows in dramatic fashion the acceleration of glacial melt on a global scale. This is the power of photography...

Personally, I don't care as much about climate change as I do about the more tangible, immediate reality of pollution on what I drink or what I eat. Throughout history, the world has experienced dramatic climate change. Some of that change (all caused by nature) nearly wiped off all life on Earth. And the last ice age was not so long ago in terms of the total age of our planet. Perhaps the levels of man-made pollution now equals or exceeds that of natural volcanic activity or maybe it's less than the combined volume of dinosaur fart gas. I don't know. But I know that it's getting harder and harder to find fish that isn't poisoned with heavy metals. That is a reality and one that I care about. Whether we believe in global warming or not, I think we have reason to worry about pollution for more immediate reasons.

Link | Posted on Oct 8, 2015 at 05:42 UTC
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