zakk9

Lives in Thailand Samut Prakan, Thailand
Works as a Graphic designer
Has a website at http://epixx.wordpress.com/
Joined on Sep 18, 2004
About me:

Some Fujis, Nikons and a Panasonic,
and a few Nikkor, Zuiko, Tamron, Panasonic and Zeiss lenses

Comments

Total: 277, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Leica Noctilux-M 75mm F1.25 ASPH sample gallery (244 comments in total)

Nice lens. Pity about my skinny wallet...

Link | Posted on Jul 17, 2018 at 03:36 UTC as 26th comment

I've read the comments. Here's the summary:
- All my bags cost 20/30/50 dollars, unlike this overpriced piece of s**t.
- I don't buy ugly bags like this.
- I have no use for the solutions that these bags offer. Must be crap.

Copy and paste to all camera bag articles on dpr.

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2018 at 05:30 UTC as 11th comment | 2 replies
On article Kodak Alaris brings 35mm Pro Image 100 film to Europe (144 comments in total)
In reply to:

PhilDunn: Good Lord, I can see the grain in even that small sample image.

No problem. Just go to the nearest church and ask Him to remove the grain.

Link | Posted on Jul 6, 2018 at 04:01 UTC
On article Kodak Alaris brings 35mm Pro Image 100 film to Europe (144 comments in total)

It's a very nice and very forgiving film, and very popular here in Asia. For people shots, I actually prefer it to the more expensive Ektar 100. I wish it were available in 120 format as well.

Link | Posted on Jul 5, 2018 at 21:49 UTC as 19th comment

Many nice photos, but the whole concept of "travel photography" is a bit past its prime. It dates back to the days when western photographers travelled to "unexplored" parts of the world with the assumption that the locals weren't able to capture their own lives on photo. So what is it then? An American taking photos in China while the Chinese takes photos in America?

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2018 at 02:03 UTC as 30th comment | 8 replies

Vertical video is unnatural because stories mostly happen horisontally. People, except Superman, move horisontally, cars drive horisontally, even birds mostly fly horisontally. If you're going to tell a story, you need to show more than the main subject and his or her smiling face. But all this might be obsolete these days of course, where most stories are about me, showing me using my new gadget to the world, a world that isn't watching anyway, so who cares...

Vertical is for selfies, period. That's where the market is, and Instagram knows that.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2018 at 00:16 UTC as 23rd comment | 5 replies
On article Video: Diving into the demise of Kodak (227 comments in total)
In reply to:

zakk9: To those who think that Fujifilm survived because they managed the transition to digital: No, that was not the reason. They survived because they found another area where their technology could be used: Cosmetics.

Here's the long story:
https://video.toggle.sg/en/series/inside-the-storm-s2/ep2/475145

And the short version:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mSdvoQX7ApY&t=7s

Operating income, Fujifilm Holdings, fiscal year ending 31 March 2018:
Imaging solutions: 56,025 million yen
Healthcare & Material solutions: 92,796 million yen
Document solutions: 13,980 million yen

Cosmetics are a part of the healthcare division, and I haven't seen a breakdown of the total from that division. However, Fujifilm management have stated repeatedly that cosmetics and healthcare products are what "saved" the company. It's a well known fact that the profit margins from cosmetics and healthcare products are very high, which may explain the statements from Fujifilm. See also the "Inside the storm" video.

What is very interesting is that the imaging division is currently the fastest growing division of Fujifilm, probably because of their very strong market position throughout the rapidly growing Asian market.

Link | Posted on Jun 15, 2018 at 02:22 UTC
On article Video: Diving into the demise of Kodak (227 comments in total)
In reply to:

hammarbytp: This is not a story limited to Kodak.

It goes like this. You are a market leader in your area, maybe close to a monopoly. Your products are profitable because you are the only supplier, money roles in and there is little need to invest in product development. Most goes to branding and advertising

Then a disruptive economy comes along that threatens your market. The guys at the top are not stupid, but they have a dilemma. All there money is tied up in the old technology. There can't just dump it and switch to the new stuff because it is risky. Some of the new guys, say this us where the cool stuff is, lets get in. But if they do, they legitimise a competitor. So you either try to kill it, or do a poor implementation in case it competes with your cash cow.

In the end however technology has a momentum of its own, and eventually the market flips and they find themselves obsolete

And that is how Canon and Nikon lost the camera market to mirrorless :)

No, Canon and Nikon haven't lost the camera market due to mirrorless. Canon still manufactures more DSLR cameras than mirrorless cameras produced by all suppliers combined. Nikon is somewhat smaller.

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2018 at 23:00 UTC
On article Video: Diving into the demise of Kodak (227 comments in total)

To those who think that Fujifilm survived because they managed the transition to digital: No, that was not the reason. They survived because they found another area where their technology could be used: Cosmetics.

Here's the long story:
https://video.toggle.sg/en/series/inside-the-storm-s2/ep2/475145

And the short version:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mSdvoQX7ApY&t=7s

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2018 at 22:57 UTC as 61st comment | 3 replies

Whenever a camera bag is reviewed on this site, the comments are the same:
It doesn't look useful for me and it's too expensive so it must be a piece of junk. My camera bag on the other hand, the one that I bought on FleeBay 300 years ago for 25 cent, will room all my cool, expenisive gear, plus a hydraulic jack for my car and a full dinner set for 24 persons.

Dear dpreview, you could standarise this. Just get someone to program a comment generator that does the commenting for you, all with the usual negative blah blah.

Link | Posted on May 26, 2018 at 23:38 UTC as 41st comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

MarshallG: Yet another Chinese company stealing Trademark from Japanese camera makers. They should name their flash something else.

They are as Chinese as Apple. Based in Ireland actually, although I'm sure their products are manufactured in China... like Apple. I don't know where the German name comes from.

Link | Posted on May 14, 2018 at 21:28 UTC
On article Tamron 70-210mm F4 Di VC USD sample gallery (115 comments in total)

To those who think this lens isn't sharp enough, stop looking at the jpegs in your browser. Did you really think that a 50+ MP image would show a lot of detail with a 15MB file size? Combine that with dpr's use of ISO 800 for many of the photos, leaving them surprisingly noisy, and no lens will look sharp. Dpr must hate Tamron to do this against them.

I opened some of the RAW files, and they actually look very good. Absolutely a lens to consider.

Link | Posted on May 13, 2018 at 01:03 UTC as 11th comment | 2 replies

The best camera for me is one that will still be a good camera in 5 years, in 10 years and hopefully in 15 years, not a camera that scores highly today but can't be repaired tomorrow. My Nikon D2Xs (12 years old) and D300 (10 years old) are like that. In spite of heavy use, they still work fine, in spite of old age, I can still get original batteries and spare parts.

When I buy a D500 later this year, I'm confident that I will have the latest model for many years to come, and I'm quite sure that spare parts will be available in 2030 as well. I guess I'm old fashioned, but when I pay $2,000 for a camera, I kind of expect it to be great for a few years.

Sony doesn't launch a new model every year because customers need better cameras. They do it because customers have money that they want.

No, I won't "adapt". I'd rather give my money to someone who needs them more than me than giving them to Sony for no good reason.

Link | Posted on May 9, 2018 at 17:00 UTC as 67th comment | 5 replies

I know people who post 20 photos (selfies) a day. They must feel very, very well...

Link | Posted on May 5, 2018 at 05:23 UTC as 23rd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

winkalman: I run the IT department at a small private high school. We purchased a lab full of perpetual CS2 licenses in 2006 and have been using them ever since. The educational pricing put us out around $5,550 for 20 licenses. Over that same 12 year span we would have spent $30,000 (minimum 500 seats at $5 per year times 12 years) with their subscription pricing. Would I like to upgrade from CS2? You bet. Will I be signing up for CC subscription pricing? Hell no!

I was teaching photo editing on 286 and 386 computers running Windows 3.11 around 1995 at a school that couldn't afford Photoshop, so we used an alternative photo editing software that worked fine for our needs. If I were to teach photo editing today, much of of what I would teach would be the same as back then. The principles of editing are still the same. The technical side of Photoshop is the easy part. Any nitwit can figure those out by reading the manual or watching some Youtube video.

Schools exist to teach students how to use their brains, not to repeat what Adobe has thought out for them.

Link | Posted on May 4, 2018 at 04:59 UTC
In reply to:

winkalman: I run the IT department at a small private high school. We purchased a lab full of perpetual CS2 licenses in 2006 and have been using them ever since. The educational pricing put us out around $5,550 for 20 licenses. Over that same 12 year span we would have spent $30,000 (minimum 500 seats at $5 per year times 12 years) with their subscription pricing. Would I like to upgrade from CS2? You bet. Will I be signing up for CC subscription pricing? Hell no!

Students don't need the latest version to learn editing skills, they need a good teacher. Using an older version is more of a challenge, which is exactly what students need: challenges. Waht Adobe wants is obviously students who depend on Adobe's tricks and features, so that they won't learn how todo things manually and will be dependent on Adobe software once they start working.

Link | Posted on May 3, 2018 at 23:16 UTC

"underscores Adobe’s commitment to providing students and teachers with the world’s leading digital creative tools and skills,"

Let me correct that:

"underscores Adobe’s commitment to create student and teacher addicts with the world’s most expensive digital creative tools and subscription schemes,"

That wasn't too hard, was it? Just cancelled my own CC all included subscription btw., after 20 years as an Adobe user. The last price hike was simply too much.

Link | Posted on May 3, 2018 at 23:10 UTC as 28th comment | 3 replies
On article Huawei P20 Pro vs Canon 5DS R (58 comments in total)

What is happening is similar to what happened when photographers switched from large and medium formats to Leica 35mm cameras. There will still be DSLR users in the future, but this is the way things are going. Phone camera technology is now so good that it easilly outshines the DSLR cameras we used to call "professional" just ten years ago, obviously except for the lack of telephoto lenses.

I started experiment with mirrorless almost 10 years ago with the GH1. Time to move on, time to develop further. No reason to get stuck in the past. P20 for digital plus Nikon F6 for film sounds like a good combo. The best of two worlds.

Link | Posted on May 2, 2018 at 00:47 UTC as 1st comment
On article Huawei P20 Pro vs Canon 5DS R (58 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rich Evans: The proper comparision here is not against a 5DSr which is a specialised machine but comparing to smaller sensors with worse optics like the Micro Four Thirds or 1 inch cameras.

Since MFT already lost the size, price, IQ race to bigger sensors the only thing that can save it in the long run is computational imagery like the ones employed in this phone and on the iPhone. Otherwise its just an overpriced toy. Just look at the photos taken with it and the level of knowledge of the user base.

Full frame cameras will always have the edge in IQ and user base because it is the differentiator between a working tool and, well, a toy.

Probably the funniest post I've read so far this year. Fortunately, those who buy my photos don't know that I use toy cameras for my work. I do consider replacing the m4/3 toys for the P20 for some work though.

Oh, and having had and used extensively several "full frame" cameras, I've now sold all except the Nikon F6 and some Olympus OM bodies. Film is still great.

Link | Posted on May 2, 2018 at 00:35 UTC
In reply to:

starbase218: When Microsoft ruled, nobody could directly attack them. No competing product could ever hope to come close. Then the internet came, then more devices came. Now you don't even need a computer anymore. You need a tablet, a phone and/or a laptop that runs either Chrome OS, Mac OS or Windows. Things have changed and Microsoft's role has been greatly diminished.

I feel the same might be true with the camera market. When DSLRs were the mainstay of photography, Canon and Nikon were unbeatable. Now things have changed.

But Microsoft is still here and the quality of their services and products has actually improved. So maybe there is a silver lining.

DSLRs won't be leading the pack forever, and the people at Nikon know that.

Link | Posted on Apr 30, 2018 at 22:24 UTC
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