Sammy Yousef

Sammy Yousef

Lives in Sydney, NSW
Works as a Computer Software Analyst/Programmer/Engineer
Joined on Jul 15, 2004

Comments

Total: 123, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

bolador: Actual AF-S 70-300 ED G VR is not sharp enoguh at 300mm until f/11..
Will this be better??

Did you AF Fine Tune it? Mine are usable wide open and really good by f/8.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 09:18 UTC
In reply to:

laueddy: I fully understand Solar Eclipse Filter, but I am hoping not to have to spend $100 for a single event.
I have a 82mm ND1000 which is about 10 Stops. I also have a 82mm Hoya Variable ND which is approx. 1.5-9 stops. Would combining both be sufficient???

I can't recommend you risk an expensive camera body and definitely don't look through the viewfinder. Others have used welder's masks. Or eclipse glasses in front of a shorter focal length lens. Seriously I will repeat don't risk your eyesight looking through the viewfinder. You can always buy a new camera but ruining your eyes won't just ruin your photography, it'll ruin your life.

Link | Posted on Jul 11, 2017 at 03:24 UTC

What makes a great photo is that it speaks to a wide audience and there are no distracting flaws. For a great photo EVERYTHING comes together - the art, the gear, all the technicalities, the subject, the context.

While it doesn't have to be technically perfect a single large imperfection can ruin it. Think of your favourite most inspiring photos. Would they win any awards with a significant Gaussian blur applied? How about if contrast or colour was off? Misframed?

And do not underestimate the importance of the audience. What speaks to one person at a particular time in a particular context is boring or insignificant to another. It's one thing that a lot of people miss when trying to improve their own work by "copying the masters". Your copy of Moonrise Hernandez doesn't occupy the same place in the history of photography and wildlife conservation. Your photo of your friend or a model in the same pose is not going to hold the same significance as Karsh's Einstein, Monroe or Churchill

Link | Posted on Jul 10, 2017 at 21:58 UTC as 10th comment
On article Nikon D7500: Should I upgrade from my D7200? (289 comments in total)
In reply to:

rsjoberg: I think I'll just hold on to my D7000 until someone makes me a deal on a D7200 that I can't refuse.

Andrew770 Fine Tuning is available on the D7200, just not automated selection of the value. Also the 4K video is horrible crop, and almost no one is going to use ISO 51,200 because while it is amazing that it's possible the results are not so amazing. The body on the D7200 is plenty comfortable too. In fact the only things that might make any practical difference that you mentioned are AF, possibly the flip screen screen and maybe the metering.

I bought another D7200 days after the D7500 was announced. No thanks.

Link | Posted on Jul 3, 2017 at 06:31 UTC
On article Nikon D7500: Should I upgrade from my D7200? (289 comments in total)
In reply to:

Andrew770: Nikon D7500 at $1,250 is the best camera on the market below their flagship D500. It is a massive upgrade from the D7200 - see comparison:

D7500 is better than the D7200:

Video (7500: 4K Video, Full HD 1080p with Image Stabilization)
Video (7200: Full HD with Crop Image; no Image Stabilization)
Metering (7500: 180,000 Pixels / Advanced Scene Recognition)
Metering (D7200: 2,016 Pixels / Same as D7000 and D7100)
High ISO (D7500: 51,200) - Excellent
High ISO (D7200: 25,600) - Good
Auto Picture Control (D7500: Tone Curve for correct skin tones)
Auto Picture Control (D7200 - None)
Touch Screen / Tilting-LCD (D7500 - Yes)
Touch Screen / Tilting-LCD (D7200 - No)
Comfortable Body with Deep Hand-grip: (D7500 - Yes)
Comfortable Body with Deep Hand-grip: (D7200 - No)
EXPEED 5 Image Processor: (D7500 - Yes)
EXPEED 4 Image Processor: (D7200 - 30% slower)
Full weather-sealing: (D7500 - Yes)
Full weather-sealing: (D7200 - No)
Sports (D7500 - Yes / 8 fps - 33% faster)
Sports (D7200 - No / 6 fps)

Canon's going to be better than either with dual pixel AF despite lacking 4K for video. (D7500 has horrible crop 4K btw). Metering wasn't broken, so this may be an improvement but was one needed? Almost no one is going to shoot at 51,200 ISO for any significant portion of their photos. Slight increase in high ISO performance at lower ISOs is a small imrpovement. Auto picture control is unproven, easy to fix skin tones in post. Touch and tilt is a genuine improvement but tilt isn't fully articulated which is what you really want in a movable screen. The D7200's grip is very comfortable. EXPEED 5 is going to be better than 4 so I'll give you that. You can definitely shoot sports with a D7200 and 2FPS is not that significant.

Meanwhile in the D7500 you've lost the second card slot and grip support (and probably for every camera that succeeds it), no AI indexing tab, lower res rear screen, no NFC, lower shots per charge and every shot is 3.1 MP lower including the ones that count,

Link | Posted on Jul 3, 2017 at 02:32 UTC
On article Nikon D7500: Should I upgrade from my D7200? (289 comments in total)
In reply to:

endofoto: Nikon D7200 has a better sensor than D500 in every aspect according to DXO lab results. Flagship D5 has much lower DR than D7200, like cameras form last decade. What is the reason for this reversing back?, I think it is for video and higher speed. I don't need neither of those. I shoot macro and landscape. D7500 is also using D500 sensor. Now I will get D7200 while I can find one.

People go on about the "megapixel race" but 24MP is entry level now and it has benefitted people's photography. The megapixel race is at 40-50MP, not 20-24MP.

20.9 megapixels just doesn't cut it for an expensive enthusiast machine. The only thing you get in return with the D7500/D500 is a deeper buffer and more FPS. I can see how that would appeal if you're shooting a lot of sports/action and large wildlife (where you're not counting each pixel). But for most other applications it's a net loss, albeit often a small one.

You're going to get more detail in a landscape out of a D3400!

Link | Posted on Jul 3, 2017 at 02:20 UTC
On article Nikon D7500: Should I upgrade from my D7200? (289 comments in total)
In reply to:

DesmondD: It depends what you want/need. The D7200 is a really nice camera and has more than enough features for most photographers needs.
The lack of a second card slot could be. a big issue for someone shooting an important event if there is a card failure - no point having the best auto-focus system if you lose all your photos.
I think the D7200 is going to be a last of its kind as the D90 was when the D7000 came out. From now on if we want a dual card slot we will be forced to upgrade half a step to the D500 series. The D7500 is more like an advanced D5700, half a step below the D7200. If we want a focus drive motor we have to keep upgrading, first from the D50, then the D90 and now the D7200. There may be no replacement for the D7200 - we have to step backwards to the D7500[/D5700] with single card slot or up to a D500/510 in future, if we also want dual card slots.

Agree that this is the nail in the coffin for dual card slot mid range Nikon cameras. But it's worse than that. But dual slots was a selling point and there will be plenty who jump ship to Canon or Sony, and not just pros who want to go cheap.

The D300S had a built in flash. The D500 does not. A lot of people rubbish the built in flash but it makes the kit light and i've taken and seen many good shots from that much maligned little flash.

There are a lot more enthusiasts than there are professionals, and throwing away that segment of the market is foolish. These are people who often will never be able to justify the purchase or even just plain afford pro bodies. They are also the segment that is most easily attracted to a different manufacturer. The low end is gone. They'll grab the cheapest camera they can get hold of and leave it on auto IF they can be persuaded to upgrade from their phone at all. Nikon might not survive this madness.

Link | Posted on Jul 3, 2017 at 02:14 UTC
On article Nikon D7500: Should I upgrade from my D7200? (289 comments in total)
In reply to:

Boomlift: So many disregard the second card slot using the reasoning that a single card has more than enough capacity. Not denying that but I love the ability to seperate RAW and JPEG when I get home without a batch conversion. And no grip? The 7500 is the best smartphone clad in DSLR clothes.

As if only a pro has a use for making sure their photos aren't lost to a card malfunction. By the way there have always been lower end pros shooting with lower end cameras. In 2005 I remember pros using the D70 for kids soccer and even for weddings!

Link | Posted on Jul 3, 2017 at 02:08 UTC
On article Shooting experience: how the Nikon D7500 won me over (194 comments in total)
In reply to:

tom1234567: Waiting for the upgrade to the D7200
I don't want to downgrade to a lesser D7500,
its important I and others have two SD slots and the better IQ plus more,
which the D7200 has
a better upgrade from lesser Dxxxx would be the D7200
that's my point of view on the matter

Tom G

For a start I make good use of the inbuilt flash that people scoff at and it makes my camera an ideal travel machine. I also don't like taking a hit on the resolution, even if it is just 3MP - for some of the photography I do extreme cropping is required and every MP counts. Finally, 2nd hand is always a gamble, but I have bought 2nd hand lenses.

Link | Posted on Jun 26, 2017 at 07:31 UTC
On article Shooting experience: how the Nikon D7500 won me over (194 comments in total)

If you're use to shooting in low light, shooting in brighter light may have skewed your view of how well the 3D tracking performed. First of all it's going to do better in brighter more contrasty conditions, and secondly depending on what mode you shot in you may have had a smaller aperture and therefore more depth of field.

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2017 at 10:41 UTC as 6th comment
On article Shooting experience: how the Nikon D7500 won me over (194 comments in total)
In reply to:

Polacofede: would be nice to see two capable photographers one with D7500 and the other with D7200 same glass, who gets the best shots... IMHO the D7500 has a nice advantage with the tilting screen, but that's all.

Unless the circumstances are particularly demanding - suited specifically to one camera's features or the other, my guess, the better photographer gets the better shots.

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2017 at 10:36 UTC
On article Shooting experience: how the Nikon D7500 won me over (194 comments in total)
In reply to:

Johnny621: The video clip on fine tuning the 7500 is great, but does it work on the D7100? Looks like a great way to fine tune....quickly

Auto fine tune sounds great but it's not hard to manually fine tune if you're willing to spend a little time and a few shutter actuations.

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2017 at 10:33 UTC
On article Shooting experience: how the Nikon D7500 won me over (194 comments in total)
In reply to:

tom1234567: Waiting for the upgrade to the D7200
I don't want to downgrade to a lesser D7500,
its important I and others have two SD slots and the better IQ plus more,
which the D7200 has
a better upgrade from lesser Dxxxx would be the D7200
that's my point of view on the matter

Tom G

Sad to say you'll be waiting a long time. I bought another D7200 days after the D7500 body was announced.

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2017 at 10:32 UTC
On article Nikon D3: The camera that changed everything (283 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ruekon: To me the D500 changed everything. By chance Nikon had just released it when I was looking for an upgrade for my D90. The pro control layout, fast processing speed, superb view finder and AF, and incredible high ISO performance make a real difference. This might be the same sort of feeling you had with the D3 once.

The D500 makes me think now that Nikon might have been right when promoting APS-C as ultimate digital format prior to the D3, whereas full frame (like D8xx) is the new medium format of the digital age.

It isn't just about being lazy.

My wife's SB-900 died at a dance concert about a month ago. Her fault. She didn't charge her batteries and when she was shooting left her bag behind and couldn't get to a fresh pair. Not only did she cover the dancing well, her shot of the night was a stunning image of my daughter's friend mid ballet leap.

The external flash doesn't always out perform the on board flash. If a subtle fill is needed it takes some experimentation to get the right output if shooting a dynamic scene in TTL. If you aren't careful you're in much more danger of blowing parts of the scene. Not to mention the intimidation factor.

And that's before you talk about the intimidation factor, particularly with a large flash used directly.

Also if resolution was absoluetely key I wouldn't get a 36MP camera, I'd go for a 50MP Canon or move up to full format as you suggest. But I don't want to spend 6-10x as much on a camera body. That is a let them eat cake solution.

Link | Posted on Jun 2, 2017 at 04:38 UTC
On article How do you know you need a new camera? (409 comments in total)

Perhaps I'm in the minority but "ohhh shiny" doesn't interest me.

Jumps in high ISO performance, AF performance, FPS, buffer and yes megapixels have in fact improved my photos. I think 24MP is as high as I need but I don't want to downgrade to below that.

I would absolutely upgrade in a heartbeat if I could get a 2-3 stop increase in high ISO performance. I hope one day before I die there is a technological breakthrough that gives us affordable clean ISO 25600 or better 51200 with decent dynamic range.

I would upgrade if I got 3D tracking AF that actually kept up with fast sports. I could use that for airshows, jousting, or the kids' sports.

I would upgrade if I could go from 5-6FPS up to 24FPS.

I might upgrade if the ergonomics let me change between settings more quickly. 2 sets of user settings isn't exactly fantastic.

I would upgrade for anything else that I was confident would absolutely make a difference to IQ or keeper rate.

That's pretty much it though.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 11:12 UTC as 81st comment
On article Nikon D3: The camera that changed everything (283 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ruekon: To me the D500 changed everything. By chance Nikon had just released it when I was looking for an upgrade for my D90. The pro control layout, fast processing speed, superb view finder and AF, and incredible high ISO performance make a real difference. This might be the same sort of feeling you had with the D3 once.

The D500 makes me think now that Nikon might have been right when promoting APS-C as ultimate digital format prior to the D3, whereas full frame (like D8xx) is the new medium format of the digital age.

I absolutely am happy with it. That's why I bought a second one for my birthday, about 3 days after the D7500 announcement. The only thing that the D7500 has that I could possibly want is a slightly faster framerate and deeper buffer. Time will tell if AF is better in practical use.

The D7500 and the blatant focus on gutting features on the "prosumer" line to force users to buy more expensive cameras is quite likely to push me away for my next upgrade. If the D500 at least had kept the built in flash I could aspire to own it one day but that one omission is enough to sap the joy of being able to grab that one camera and go at a moment's notice.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 11:01 UTC
On article Nikon D3: The camera that changed everything (283 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ruekon: To me the D500 changed everything. By chance Nikon had just released it when I was looking for an upgrade for my D90. The pro control layout, fast processing speed, superb view finder and AF, and incredible high ISO performance make a real difference. This might be the same sort of feeling you had with the D3 once.

The D500 makes me think now that Nikon might have been right when promoting APS-C as ultimate digital format prior to the D3, whereas full frame (like D8xx) is the new medium format of the digital age.

Well that's insulting on so many levels.

You have totally mis-comprehended my response. My complaint has absolutely nothing to do with specs on paper. My disdain has everything to do with removing a feature I have often used to good effect, and forcing me to lug around a heavy flash and batteries if I wish to achieve similar, making the camera less practical to take with me in a lot of situations. I don't have a problem with the brightness of the viewfinders on the D70, D90, D7100, D7200. I'm not going to miss a shot because the viewfinder isn't "professional" or bright. If I don't have a flash I may well miss the shot.

Features matter. And specs matter. Otherwise you and I would likely be shooting with a home made pinhole camera.

Also I'm a software developer and am well aware what alpha means.

Lastly, Nikon has been my DSLR brand of choice since about 2004. It is the changes they are making now that are making me rethink whether it will be for the next couple of decades.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 02:40 UTC
On article Nikon D3: The camera that changed everything (283 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ruekon: To me the D500 changed everything. By chance Nikon had just released it when I was looking for an upgrade for my D90. The pro control layout, fast processing speed, superb view finder and AF, and incredible high ISO performance make a real difference. This might be the same sort of feeling you had with the D3 once.

The D500 makes me think now that Nikon might have been right when promoting APS-C as ultimate digital format prior to the D3, whereas full frame (like D8xx) is the new medium format of the digital age.

The D500 changed everything for me too. Lack of a popup flash changed me from being a potential buyer into someone who won't touch it. I've used it to good effect so when people complain that you can't get a good shot using it I have to wonder if they've even tried. Not a big fan of slight decrease in resolution on the D500 either. Crippling the D7500 to push in that direction only hardens my resolve. I wouldn't be surprised if I move to Canon in the long run. At the moment the investment in glass and flash makes me reluctant to switch, even though I do own lower end Canon DSLRs which I use as throw around cameras that I worry about less.

The D90 was an amazing camera, and my wife still owns and uses one. The D7200 is at a whole other level. Such a pity they did what they did with the D7500.

Link | Posted on May 26, 2017 at 23:40 UTC
On article Nikon reshuffles management structure (248 comments in total)

Business as usual. 2nd envelope.

A new CEO had just been hired by a large high tech corporation. The ex-CEO who was stepping down met with him privately and presented him with three numbered envelopes. "Open these if you run up against a problem you don't think you can solve," he said.

Things went well for a while but then sales went bad so he pulled out the 1st envelope. It read, "Blame your predecessor."

So he called a press conference and did just that. The problems went away for a while.

But soon manufacturing and QC issues led to unhappy customers and another sales slump. It was time to open the 2nd envelope. The message read, "Reorganize." So he did and again the problems seemed to have been solved for a while and the company a success

But before long once again, the company fell on difficult times. The fixes he had implemented were band aids. The CEO went to his office, closed the door and opened the 3rd envelope. It said, "Prepare three envelopes."

Link | Posted on May 20, 2017 at 13:24 UTC as 28th comment
On article Nikon announces midrange D7500 DSLR (396 comments in total)
In reply to:

james s. kennedy: I have a D7000. My only FF is the D700 and that is good enough for me.

I am pure amateur. Should I get a D7200 or D7500 if I decide to upgrade?

It depends entirely on what you shoot and what lenses you have. IF I was shooting lots and lots of action I *might* be tempted to go D7500 despite its shortcomings. If shooting landscape, portraits etc, the extra detail in the D7200 may be more important. If you have or every want to buy AIS lenses the lack of an indexing tab is a no go for D7500.

Link | Posted on Apr 22, 2017 at 04:42 UTC
Total: 123, showing: 1 – 20
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