Sammy Yousef

Sammy Yousef

Lives in Sydney, NSW
Works as a Computer Software Analyst/Programmer/Engineer
Joined on Jul 15, 2004

Comments

Total: 217, showing: 1 – 20
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Excellent. Finally an excuse to ditch Nikon which is heading in a direction I don't like. If I can't use my existing lenses I certainly won't invest in the new system.

Link | Posted on Jan 14, 2018 at 09:06 UTC as 44th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Sardonic G: So why do these companies keep passing Nik software around? Nikon, Google now DXOMark. Who is going to "ni(c)k" it next?

Because each time (other than Google) they find a way to make you pay for it all over again.

Link | Posted on Dec 27, 2017 at 09:20 UTC
On article Nikon D850 vs Sony a7R III: Which is best? (1079 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sammy Yousef: When I see major sporting events, motorsports and airshows being shot with predominantly mirrorless cameras, I'll know the time to switch is in the next few years.

People under-estimate how important focus tracking is for various kinds of photography. Not everything of course. Wouldn't make a difference for landscape oraAstrophotography, but unless you're shooting very still things, good focus is a large part of the battle.

I'm middle-aged now. So it may or may not happen for me. Right now it's not even close.

@Simon Forster

I agree that lack of lenses is an issue, but how many pro sports shooters use more than a handful of lenses regularly? Having dealt with Nikon as an amateur in Australia, I wouldn't pay a cent for NPS if that's what you mean by support.

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2017 at 04:46 UTC
On article Nikon D850 vs Sony a7R III: Which is best? (1079 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sammy Yousef: When I see major sporting events, motorsports and airshows being shot with predominantly mirrorless cameras, I'll know the time to switch is in the next few years.

People under-estimate how important focus tracking is for various kinds of photography. Not everything of course. Wouldn't make a difference for landscape oraAstrophotography, but unless you're shooting very still things, good focus is a large part of the battle.

I'm middle-aged now. So it may or may not happen for me. Right now it's not even close.

@Thematic. I shoot airshows, jousting, and an active family. The sports shooting use case is a very close analog.

If I wanted to drive a car fast I would absolutely wait till professionals used Teslas in racing before buying one myself. The only reason that suggestion is ridiculous is that it's illegal to drive at race car speeds on the road.

Link | Posted on Dec 7, 2017 at 05:41 UTC
On article Nikon D850 vs Sony a7R III: Which is best? (1079 comments in total)

When I see major sporting events, motorsports and airshows being shot with predominantly mirrorless cameras, I'll know the time to switch is in the next few years.

People under-estimate how important focus tracking is for various kinds of photography. Not everything of course. Wouldn't make a difference for landscape oraAstrophotography, but unless you're shooting very still things, good focus is a large part of the battle.

I'm middle-aged now. So it may or may not happen for me. Right now it's not even close.

Link | Posted on Dec 7, 2017 at 03:17 UTC as 45th comment | 6 replies
On article LG V30 camera review (139 comments in total)
In reply to:

SamTruax: These used to be the phones of choice for serious phone photography but, other than some decent low light results, the images and videos here are really poor. The video is especially poor. It has a lot of great manual controls but what's the use if the results are so poor?

I have a G4. I fully expect it will die like my last 2 G4 phones. (I didn't get the usual boot loop. I had wifi and bluetooth die). I won't buy another LG phone. It's better than my much older Galaxy S4, and for a while it had what many considered the best camera. But things have gotten much worse at LG. And at the prices being charged for flagship phones, I was out anyway.

Link | Posted on Nov 27, 2017 at 12:50 UTC
On article How to predict when your camera is going to die (19 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sammy Yousef: The shutter is just one component that can fail. A common failure yes, but not the only way the camera can die. For instance, the internal clock battery dying may leave you with a camera that wipes date/time or even settings each time you change batteries. Speaking of batteries, have fun finding a battery for an older camera - there is no market for them. LCD panels and rear panels also die. Then there's buttons and switches. The electronics themselves have a limited life span. It only takes one component dying to kill a camera.

@Suave I don't know what it costs where you live but here having a camera stripped down and rebuilt can cost half the price of the camera on the advanced amateur models.

Link | Posted on Nov 27, 2017 at 04:09 UTC
On article How to predict when your camera is going to die (19 comments in total)
In reply to:

AustinMN: Their tool does not measure correctly for my old Sony NEX-6. I know the number is over 150,000, but it reports about 76,000.

I tried to use the site some years ago, and it reported about 76,000 then too. I've shot at least 20,000 images with it since then.

It can only report what your camera reports. Try exiftool if you're happy to get your hands dirty with a command line program.

Link | Posted on Nov 14, 2017 at 04:06 UTC
On article How to predict when your camera is going to die (19 comments in total)

The shutter is just one component that can fail. A common failure yes, but not the only way the camera can die. For instance, the internal clock battery dying may leave you with a camera that wipes date/time or even settings each time you change batteries. Speaking of batteries, have fun finding a battery for an older camera - there is no market for them. LCD panels and rear panels also die. Then there's buttons and switches. The electronics themselves have a limited life span. It only takes one component dying to kill a camera.

Link | Posted on Nov 14, 2017 at 04:06 UTC as 9th comment | 3 replies

I'm in Australia, where every tech manufacture company price gouges us. We're a relatively small market and I wonder if we or someone like us is next. I'm heavily invested in Nikon so I don't want to see this happen.

Link | Posted on Nov 9, 2017 at 07:18 UTC as 7th comment
In reply to:

BigEnso: "Not surprisingly, Nik-developed Snapseed is not included in the transaction, and will remain with Google. The company plans to continue actively developing and improving the mobile image editing app."

Improving? The new user interface in the current version (2.18) of Snapseed is a serious downgrade from the previous version. I have no idea who their UI team has as members but it doesn't appear that any of them are photographers.

@freediverx That simply isn't true in my experience. Developers often aren't listened to at all and must do whatever the business asks, and specifications are often written by business analysts and UI designers. It can be a real battle getting a change made, or resisting a bad change.

Link | Posted on Nov 2, 2017 at 04:24 UTC
In reply to:

BigEnso: "Not surprisingly, Nik-developed Snapseed is not included in the transaction, and will remain with Google. The company plans to continue actively developing and improving the mobile image editing app."

Improving? The new user interface in the current version (2.18) of Snapseed is a serious downgrade from the previous version. I have no idea who their UI team has as members but it doesn't appear that any of them are photographers.

Often the software programmers have no say and just have to do what a user interface designer or business user acting as one tells them to do.

Link | Posted on Oct 28, 2017 at 00:44 UTC
In reply to:

wasTF: So the download button is disabled now??!?!?

I'm not getting the confirmation email either. Sent to 2 different email addresses. Great start DxO. You're really winning people over. Bah!

Link | Posted on Oct 28, 2017 at 00:42 UTC
In reply to:

Sammy Yousef: No offence, but as I don't know how to put it any other way: You guys are crazy.

You're just dying to give a company money for something that use to be free in the hope that it will be improved. When history clearly shows few software products improve in the hands of new owners.

The guys that actually developed this software you know and love are probably long gone. I wonder if the source base is even intelligible or whether the whole point of acquiring it was to kill off any competition for new U-point software and incorporate it as is.

I hope I'm wrong, but as an example: did Paintshop Pro improve after Jasc was acquired? Sure more features, but also bloat and arguably spyware DRM.

If Google had opened the source, you'd have multiple companies jump on U-points would have become just another option in a lot of different pieces of software.

What makes you think DxO would never go the subscription route?

Here comes the new master, same as the old. You guys are happy about this?

@Lihkin Yes but it's been free for a couple of years and now it's being locked up again. But it seems users here like paying again and again for the same software and cheer that on as progress. You're probably paying more by re-buying the software every few years than you would pay on a subscription anyway.

@RTSIMON The best plugin ever made is being locked up again behind a paywall, with no guarantee that it will be taken in a direction people will like.

Anyway it's clear I'm wasting my breath here. Not the first time. I warned about Microsoft Flight Simulator X when activation was brought in. It's gone from having a thriving community to one that's still active but much smaller and fragmented. The original devs were let go and the product has been mostly stagnant (Yes available on Steam and some updates but nothing significant). This isn't the same situation, of course. And development may continue, but expecting it to be great based on corporate promises is foolish.

Link | Posted on Oct 28, 2017 at 00:34 UTC
In reply to:

damian5000: The bigger you are, the more the idiot bloggers come out to try and make a negative viral post about you.

Yeah! Who needs a phone that displays more than one burnt in image anyway?!? Or one that doesn't catch fire! Ingrates!

Link | Posted on Oct 26, 2017 at 02:15 UTC

No offence, but as I don't know how to put it any other way: You guys are crazy.

You're just dying to give a company money for something that use to be free in the hope that it will be improved. When history clearly shows few software products improve in the hands of new owners.

The guys that actually developed this software you know and love are probably long gone. I wonder if the source base is even intelligible or whether the whole point of acquiring it was to kill off any competition for new U-point software and incorporate it as is.

I hope I'm wrong, but as an example: did Paintshop Pro improve after Jasc was acquired? Sure more features, but also bloat and arguably spyware DRM.

If Google had opened the source, you'd have multiple companies jump on U-points would have become just another option in a lot of different pieces of software.

What makes you think DxO would never go the subscription route?

Here comes the new master, same as the old. You guys are happy about this?

Link | Posted on Oct 26, 2017 at 02:11 UTC as 20th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

larrytusaz: Dumb question--I have Lightroom 5.7 and Photoshop CS2. My edits are basic (white balance, sharpness etc in RAW, modest airbrushing in Photoshop). I hear good things about "U point" technology but I wouldn't know the first thing about how to use it. (I had Nikon Capture NX2 for awhile and never utilized it then.) What would this do for me? Good "film emulator" presets or such?

U-point lets you pick a point on your photo, make a circle around it, then apply a filter that fades off gradually as you get further from the center of the circle. You can then fade the whole thing off by a percentage.

Its basically a selective layer mask, that lets you blend an effect nicely. And in fact you can (and I have) emulate it that way with a layer and painting a circle on the selection, but that's clunky and difficult to control. These U-points are just damn quick and easy.

For example, want to sharpen just the eye, or increase saturation of the iris? No problem. Drop a U-point, decrease the size of the circle and that effect just fades off without any effect on the rest of your photo.

Capture NX 2 still did all of this best, but that piece of software is now ancient history.

Link | Posted on Oct 26, 2017 at 02:02 UTC
In reply to:

MGTF1956: Great news, love to work with NIK collection in PS.
I purchased the Nik Collection some time before Google purchased it.
Is it possible to continue supporting me and provide updates to me for free even if they charge the freeloaders ?

Paid in 2014 is still less of a freeloader than never paid.

Link | Posted on Oct 26, 2017 at 01:55 UTC
In reply to:

Grahame Jenkins: I can feel a double charge coming on here......I bought from Nik before the collection was made free on Google (!) and, just watch, DxO will find a way to extract more from me no doubt!!

I honestly can't think of a better way of getting users on side and having them continue to tetll everyone they meet how great the product is than offering a discount. Considering what is spent on advertising, seems like a no-brainer. I don't imagine they'll just give you a free upgrade though.

Link | Posted on Oct 26, 2017 at 01:54 UTC
In reply to:

Chris Dodkin: Awesome update - if you don't use Nik Tools yet, you should!!!

Best UI and excellent applications - and FREE

Not free for long.

Link | Posted on Oct 26, 2017 at 01:45 UTC
Total: 217, showing: 1 – 20
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