ProT3ch

Joined on Sep 26, 2018

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Even Canon admitted that the 8K on the R5 was just for the spec sheet, they didn't expect anyone serious to use it.

Sony is like hold my beer, and they introduced usable 8K with the Sony A1.

This is also brilliant move from Sony, because all the top of the line cameras from Canon, Nikon and even the Sony A9 was all around 20MP. So Canon is probably targeting the Canon R1 as 20MP professional sports body. But now it will be compared against this 50MP monster.

Link | Posted on Jan 26, 2021 at 19:14 UTC as 3rd comment
In reply to:

deepDEEPpurple: 4k 120fps/8k no overheating, 50mp no banding, 30fps, 10mp EVF.

It's like Canon does all the effort to come close to Sony and Sony goes "cute" and zooms past it again.

The Pro Support video said that there were no overheating in 8K tests. He said he was able to shoot until the card got full and shoot again until the card got full.

Link | Posted on Jan 26, 2021 at 18:57 UTC
In reply to:

Peter 1745: Currently it is in Sigma's best interest not to make RF and Z mount lenses even though there is consumer demand for them.

Key phase of the entire interview is

So far, however, the number of orders for our lenses is still above our manufacturing capacities, and especially the capabilities of our R&D department.’

Sigma is opting to sell what it can make, not make what it can sell. I am sure Sigma could sell a lot of RF and Z mount lenses today if they were available but to make them Sigma would have to increase R&D and manufacturing capacity. However I don't see Sigma wanting to increase manufacturing capacity until the declining photography market stabilises. Rather they will wait until manufacturing capacity becomes available through declining sales of existing lenses, before introducing RF and Z mount lenses.

I did not thought that, but it looks like that Sigma R&D is limited by Software Engineers.

So when deciding what new product they want to create software is the bottleneck. They have to choose between develop a new lens for Sony/L-mount or bring an existing lens to a new mount. Developing a firmware for an entirely new mount is probably more expensive than doing so for a mount you already have good knowledge of. While Sony gave them the E mount specifications, they would have to reverse engineer Canon/Nikon mounts.

Until their factory can work on full capacity with just producing Sony lenses, they can choose to invest software R&D on new lenses and not on new mounts.

Link | Posted on Jan 13, 2021 at 16:58 UTC
In reply to:

Knock Knock Who is There: I largely agree with your predictions.. However I don't see Sony going to invest much into APS-C. This segment is done.

Even though it has been hugely important in the past it also has been a pain.
None of the manufacturers really liked the sensor size it was made popular because it was relatively cheap to produce.

However yields of FF sensor production have greatly improved and Full Frame is falling in price like a rock these days.

Canon, Sony, Nikon and Panasonic are planning to kill it like they have killed M43.

As from Panasonic - I doubt to see another M43 sensor based camera.
Keeping up two different systems in a shrinking market is just too expensive they want to become a major player in the FF market and this is what they will aim for.

As for Fujifilm - I think we will see a new GFX100 at a pricepoint of $6999,-
Still too expensive to make the slightest dent into the FF segment and as for the high-end X-Series they will have a problem selling it at this pricepoint.

I don't understand why people always compare the most expensive APS-C camera and lenses to the cheapest FF and say they are price competitive.

Sony a6100 + kit: $850
Canon RP + kit: $1400

That's a huge difference and I'm pretty sure you can find a cheaper APS-C camera than the a6100.

I cannot predict what will happen by the end of the decade, but right now it looks like they are financing their FF development with the profits from APS-C. All development happens with high end FF cameras, backporting those changes to APS-C should not be expensive.

Fuji GFX 50R Medium format camera is the same price than the Sony a9 II, does this means that FF is dead and medium format is the future?

Link | Posted on Dec 31, 2020 at 15:49 UTC
In reply to:

Knock Knock Who is There: I largely agree with your predictions.. However I don't see Sony going to invest much into APS-C. This segment is done.

Even though it has been hugely important in the past it also has been a pain.
None of the manufacturers really liked the sensor size it was made popular because it was relatively cheap to produce.

However yields of FF sensor production have greatly improved and Full Frame is falling in price like a rock these days.

Canon, Sony, Nikon and Panasonic are planning to kill it like they have killed M43.

As from Panasonic - I doubt to see another M43 sensor based camera.
Keeping up two different systems in a shrinking market is just too expensive they want to become a major player in the FF market and this is what they will aim for.

As for Fujifilm - I think we will see a new GFX100 at a pricepoint of $6999,-
Still too expensive to make the slightest dent into the FF segment and as for the high-end X-Series they will have a problem selling it at this pricepoint.

Well B&H is a camera store I don't know how many beginners know that it even exists. I checked Amazon Mirrorless Camera category: (#1 Kodak for $15), #2 Canon M50, #3 Sony a6400, #4 Canon M50 with mic, #5 Sony A7III, #6 Canon M50 with bundle, #7 Sony A7SIII, #8 Canon R6, #9 Sony A7RIII, #10 Canon R5.

Also beginners will not buy a $1000 lens, it's more likely they go for the kit lens or a super zoom like Sony 18-135, or a cheap $300 Sigma prime.

Link | Posted on Dec 31, 2020 at 02:55 UTC
In reply to:

wcan: Most interesting in the predictions (unless I misheard) was no more crop sensors from Canon and Nikon?

Pentax DSLRs has a cult following. Pentax users who wanted mirrorless probably already switched systems. I think it's a good idea for Pentax to concentrate on the DSLRs. Nikon and Canon will stop making new DSLRs, so in 5 years time if you want a new DSLR your only option will be Pentax. It will be a niche market, but Pentax can rule that segment.

Link | Posted on Dec 31, 2020 at 00:05 UTC
In reply to:

semorg: Qualcomm snapdragon processor inside the camera. One of the main manufactures (it would be Nikon most likely) will jump to mobile-based processors instead of spending a lot of R&D in their own internal chip.

This allows them to do massive amount of computational photography. Complete AI AF and probably 8k video, etc.

It's clear even with two processors Nikon was not able to do internal 10 bit recording so it'll be smart if they can shift to a processor that is so optimized for computation photography and video.

The problem with using Qualcomm chips that they include a lot of silicon not needed for Cameras like GPU capable of running 3D games, or 5G wireless modems. These chips also run at higher clock speeds. Use the newer and more expensive manufacturing process. So it would be more expensive, produce more heat and drain more battery.

That said probably all camera manufacturers use ARM reference design CPUs. To be honest both Qualcomm and Samsung also uses ARM reference design CPUs in their latest generation mobile chips.

Link | Posted on Dec 30, 2020 at 23:45 UTC
In reply to:

Horshack: I predict 2021 will be a much better year than 2020. God help us if I'm wrong.

Well we went into 2020 not knowing that coronavirus even exists. While we start 2021 with the highest (or near it) number of cases all around the world. God knows how long vaccinations will take, I red an article that puts general availability of the vaccine to September in developed countries (US, Europe, Japan). Before that only priority groups will get it.

It doesn't look good.

Link | Posted on Dec 30, 2020 at 22:23 UTC
In reply to:

Knock Knock Who is There: I largely agree with your predictions.. However I don't see Sony going to invest much into APS-C. This segment is done.

Even though it has been hugely important in the past it also has been a pain.
None of the manufacturers really liked the sensor size it was made popular because it was relatively cheap to produce.

However yields of FF sensor production have greatly improved and Full Frame is falling in price like a rock these days.

Canon, Sony, Nikon and Panasonic are planning to kill it like they have killed M43.

As from Panasonic - I doubt to see another M43 sensor based camera.
Keeping up two different systems in a shrinking market is just too expensive they want to become a major player in the FF market and this is what they will aim for.

As for Fujifilm - I think we will see a new GFX100 at a pricepoint of $6999,-
Still too expensive to make the slightest dent into the FF segment and as for the high-end X-Series they will have a problem selling it at this pricepoint.

Manufacturers will make whatever sells. For people buying their first camera it doesn't matter what the sensor size is, they will not understand the benefits anyway. What matters is price, and Full Frame cannot compete on price with APS-C.

Sony released more APS-C camera bodies than FF in 2019. They also released two new APS-C lenses last year. It doesn't seem to me that they are abandoning it.

Fuji doesn't have FF, so they will continue to push APS-C.

Nikon released new APS-C camera and lenses for their new Z mount system. It is rumored that Canon is also planning an APS-C camera for RF mount next year.

Releasing cheap FF cameras can cannibalize their mainstream $2000 - $2500 camera bodies. While they can do a fully fledged APS-C camera at $1000 without any problem. In the entry level it will be a choice between a heavily crippled FF camera vs fully featured APS-C.

Link | Posted on Dec 30, 2020 at 21:52 UTC

Does Zeiss even make cameras or lenses anymore?

I didn't hear much from them in the last year or so. I only remember the Android Camera reviewed recently, and selling their logo to different manufacturers.

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2020 at 22:05 UTC as 25th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

Pete_W: And yet DPR reviews are largely critical of Panasonic cameras. Perhaps the company knows what it’s doing after all?

The biggest problem with Panasonic is autofocus, as they still use contrast detect. This is an area that every other manufacturer is pushing and really important for normal users. Most of us will use autofocus for 99% of the time. Subject tracking and things like eye and animal eye autofocus are really impressive and makes taking sharp photos much easier.

Most serious movie production use manual focus lenses and often has dedicated person just for focusing, so this is a non issue for Netflix.

Link | Posted on Dec 17, 2020 at 21:52 UTC
In reply to:

AlephNull: The diagram seems to show a convex sensor, but the photo of the sensor looks slightly concave (which is what I would expect for something inspired by the eye).

Can’t say I am impressed when they can’t get the diagram right!

Anyone else think the curvature looks pretty shallow?

As the article says different lenses require different curvature in the sensor.

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2020 at 07:53 UTC
On article Tamron announces 17-70mm F2.8 for Sony APS-C cameras (337 comments in total)
In reply to:

cSalmon: Honestly, and I loved my 6300, I want the aps sensor size to die off so we get a wider variety of lenses - this is just another redundant focal length zoom supporting a niche camera format at this point. Could you imagine if instead of putting their manufacturing into this they came out with compact zooms for the new a7c or something comparable to canon’s 800 f11 or a 150 macro? There are so many different types of lenses they could be adding to the pool, instead it just seems to be redundancy. Maybe they could come out with a new 35mm that focal length seems to be lacking

Tamron released 8 Full Frame lenses the last 3 years. Now they release an APS-C one, and you complain that there are not enough variety in Full Frame lenses?

Link | Posted on Dec 3, 2020 at 19:42 UTC
In reply to:

schack: I think Fuji seriously fu**** up by not cooperating with Sigma and allowing them access to their x-mount API. Disagree if you like but I would buy at least a couple of these lenses and be happier with my X-T3.

Since Fuji is an APS-C only system, I don't think Sigma would release these Full Frame lenses for Fuji even if the have access to the X-mount specs.

Link | Posted on Dec 1, 2020 at 22:54 UTC
On article Zeiss ZX1 initial review (540 comments in total)
In reply to:

hteasley: Expensive at half the price. But the biggest failing, the one that kills it as a complete non-starter, even if I was rolling in cash, is: I will never buy a camera running a full computer OS. So much unneeded, CPU-intensive complexity, and manufacturers of non-smartphone, non-tablet devices *never* support their products properly, and of course lose interest in maintaining their own fork of the OS *really quickly*.

Well you are out of luck then. All the Sony NEX, A6000 and initial A7 series are known to run Android. In the A6000 there was even an app store where you can buy apps like Time Lapse. The newer Cameras are not known, but there is a really good chance that they are running the same OS as the previous ones.

It's probably true for other brands as well, why waste time implementing features like Wi-Fi, USB standards while you can use a free OS like Linux which does it for you.

https://github.com/ma1co/OpenMemories-Framework/blob/master/docs/Cameras.md

Link | Posted on Nov 25, 2020 at 23:27 UTC
In reply to:

SantaFeBill: I know very little about Apple products, but in general a change of this magnitude in system architecture creates problems with sw written for previous versions.
Should be interesting.

@AsterAstraAsteria

What I meant is that Intel can block Apple emulating AVX by not patenting the instruction set to them.

Link | Posted on Nov 12, 2020 at 08:05 UTC
In reply to:

Mr Bolton: Really liked the old PowerPC chips. Maybe this will be like a new version of that. Of course, far more modern for today.. but back when PCs were still stuck with 640k of base memory with segments after that and you had to run HiMem just to even see 'em.. the PPC was a pretty big deal.

Both Apple and AMD uses TSMC to manufacture their chips. AMD uses the 7nm currently, they can switch to 5nm for their next processors.

Link | Posted on Nov 11, 2020 at 20:02 UTC
In reply to:

panther fan: While Apple could make some great claims during their presentation, it is important to keep in mind that they are also only cooking with water. The main reason they could make such bold claims is that Intel is basically stuck on a 14nm process node from 2014 with an architecture and GPU unchanged since 2015
AMD could probably also claim 3x better efficiency with their Zen 3 cores on 7nm. And obviously both AMD and NVIDIA have made giant strides with their GPU performance/efficiency and capability. Especially if it comes to thinks like neural network acceleration. Heck even the “old” 4800U with Zen 2 is 2.5x faster than the fastest Intel chip at the same power level.
Buying capacity on the new TMSC 5nm process first gives apple another temporary advantage. So it will be really interesting to see how their big CPU/GPUs stack up. If it’s based on what I saw today it looks like pure profit maximization without actually delivering more any advantage for the user.

Well Linux is open source and a lot of Intel and AMD developers contribute tons of code for it. So it's even better as AMD developers might fix some bugs or performance issues that will benefit Intel or even Android.

Link | Posted on Nov 10, 2020 at 21:48 UTC
In reply to:

SantaFeBill: I know very little about Apple products, but in general a change of this magnitude in system architecture creates problems with sw written for previous versions.
Should be interesting.

Rosetta emulation might not work that well this time. When Apple switched previously it was from an old and slow system to a faster current one. This time it will be from a current high performant system to another one. So there is no extra performance to mask the emulation costs. There are Intel instructions like AVX which a lot of media programs use. These instructions are patented by Intel, so there is a good chance that Apple won't be able to provide these instructions in Rosetta. Programs running Rosetta will have to use the slow unaccelerated code paths. Emulation can be easily 5 times slower.

We have no idea about how competitive Apple silicon is with Intel. Not even mentioning GPU tech compared to AMD or nVidia. They only had to compete ARM reference designs in the smartphone space. Now they have to compete against companies that whole business is about making high performant CPUs and GPUs and they were doing it even before smartphones existed.

Link | Posted on Nov 10, 2020 at 21:33 UTC
In reply to:

biggercountry: Lofty claims... I look forward to putting them to the test. I’ve been waiting for the MacBook Air with Apple Silicon for a while now, and just ordered one shortly after the presentation ended. I don’t usually jump right in on 1.0 products, but the price for the MBA is more than reasonable. It’ll be interesting to be a guinea pig for once.

All I know is that I have been very impressed with every iOS device I’ve owned in the last few years. I have done mobile music production on an iPad Pro and on an iPhone, and the processing headroom that both of those devices have is astounding, especially compared to my iMac, which is only a couple of years old. I don’t expect to be disappointed.

All the third party software needs to be ported to the new processor architecture. Which is a major change and takes time. So I expect that a lot of them will not be available for a time. Maybe some of them will never get ported. The first versions will probably be buggy and not well optimized.

Link | Posted on Nov 10, 2020 at 21:05 UTC
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