G1Houston

Lives in United States Houston, United States
Joined on Jul 15, 2009

Comments

Total: 346, showing: 1 – 20
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This is also the camera that showed how disorganized and poorly managed Panasonic was. I placed an order, and waited, waited, waited, for close to 6 months and finally bought a Canon S90 which was Canon's answer to LX3 at the time. We could say that a long wait is due to the popularity of the camera, but in the end it showed Panasonic's deficiencies in estimating the demands, moving inventories around the globe, and manufacturing capacity. If more were to be delivered to the customers , they would have made more money, reducing the financial setback in the early days of the mirrorless cameras, during which there was again, a long long wait for the GH series of the camera, the 20/1.7 lens, etc.

Link | Posted on Mar 23, 2017 at 18:55 UTC as 45th comment
On article Fujifilm X100F Review (666 comments in total)
In reply to:

Favorable Exponynt: What this camera really needs is an articulating lcd, not for selfies but for waist level shooting and ground level close ups.

The X100 scored a point for style. But in the future a great modern camera should include the best features of the old and electronic ages so we can have the best of both world.

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2017 at 15:06 UTC
In reply to:

Donnie G: With Apple, you get what you pay for. The best! Cheap is what the other guys do. Deal with it. 😎

"you never get the best with the most recent iPhone model."

With iPhones, they don't need to due to efficiency achieved by software and hardware optimization. This is well known in the industry. They don't sell the phones by spec but by performance, features, and user experiences.

Link | Posted on Mar 9, 2017 at 17:35 UTC
In reply to:

Marty4650: The remarkable thing here is that a 14% market share can result in 79% of profits for the entire industry!

This tells you the iPhone is grossly overpriced. But if you are a serious Apple fan, you don't care how expensive it is, because you will line up for hours to buy the latest model at full list price. So perhaps Apple knows exactly what they are doing by pricing their products so high.

The problem for Android is they just don't have a cult following.....

"android users are generally smarter and more tech savvy, "

That is not what the marketing studies have found.

Link | Posted on Mar 8, 2017 at 22:08 UTC
In reply to:

tonyC1994: I agree iPhone is overpriced. On the other hand, it also means how bad most Android phones are built and consumers choose to pay extra hundreds of dollars for an iPhone.

A new iPhone is priced exactly the same as a new Galaxy of the same screen size, if not slightly less. Apple does not discount their phones however, but the retail asking price of an iPhone is not more expensive than a similar Android phone. Take Google Pixel for example:

The 5 in-32GB version is $649.00 and the 5.5 in-32GB version is $769. Apple iPhone 7-32GB is $649 and iPhone 7 Plus is $769.

Link | Posted on Mar 8, 2017 at 21:52 UTC
In reply to:

mandophoto: Nikon builds great cameras. What they don't do well is marketing. Canon has succeeded better than all other brands not because it makes better gear (oK, their recent spate of lenses are top notch,) but because it has the best marketing. No other camera brand has the name recognition of Canon. Notwithstanding the DPReview denizens (gear nerds,) it isn't about the gear, it's about salesmanship.

Nikon has great engineering but they don't seem to know what photographers want. The poor marketing is a reflection of this disconnect between gears and needs, so they don't know what to say about their products. There was a Nikon commercial of a young guy jumping around with a D7200 to show that Nikon is great for mobile photography with excellent portability. Are they serious? The DL or the Coolpix A type of cameras are much better suited for that role.

Link | Posted on Feb 28, 2017 at 16:32 UTC

'We’ve learned that some customers require exceptional lens performance'

But there are many more who just want lighter, smaller, and less expensive, but quality lenses.

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2017 at 17:57 UTC as 42nd comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

G1Houston: As someone who loves to take good pictures for family and for fun, the last things I want are big, heavy, and expensive gears, such as these. The FF systems offer much better profit margins, but smaller sensor cameras are what the masses use. How about a light, inexpensive 16 (or 14) mm f2.8 prime lens for the APSC format that is good enough for 90% of the users?

but no *wide angle* APSC primes. 19mm is about 30 mm FF eq.

Link | Posted on Feb 21, 2017 at 18:46 UTC

As someone who loves to take good pictures for family and for fun, the last things I want are big, heavy, and expensive gears, such as these. The FF systems offer much better profit margins, but smaller sensor cameras are what the masses use. How about a light, inexpensive 16 (or 14) mm f2.8 prime lens for the APSC format that is good enough for 90% of the users?

Link | Posted on Feb 21, 2017 at 18:27 UTC as 25th comment | 7 replies
On article Fujifilm XF 23mm F2 R WR sample gallery (284 comments in total)
In reply to:

Retzius: Looks like a very nice lens. My only issue is that it has a distinct "wide angle" feel. I don't think it would serve as a good 35mm "equivalent due to the way it renders like a wide angle lens (which it is). This is an issue I have with most cameras with a smaller sensor size. The lenses are often great but can't really serve as the "equivalents" they are advertised as.

One really should not be using a 35mm-eq lens for close up head shots. A 35 mm eq is best for environmental portrait in which the whole person is shot together with some interesting background. To avoid distortion, one should back up until the whole person is in the frame.

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2017 at 19:54 UTC
On article Super Bowl Halftime lit up by choreographed drone show (96 comments in total)

It was innovative, spectacular, and fun to watch. I am a late Gaga fan. She is not just a pop star. She was a child prodigy and recruited together with Mark Zuckerberg in a study of child prodigy by John Hopkins in the 1980s (http://www.nature.com/news/how-to-raise-a-genius-lessons-from-a-45-year-study-of-super-smart-children-1.20537). She is classically trained in voice and piano.

Link | Posted on Feb 6, 2017 at 20:39 UTC as 25th comment | 4 replies
On article Nikon D5600 sample gallery (164 comments in total)
In reply to:

Robert Garcia NYC: Just gorgeous image quality. I wish Nikon would do a Olympus/Fuji body small version of this.

Small body with TWO command dials.

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2017 at 21:30 UTC
In reply to:

zeratulmrye: It's a 70-200F2.8 and I saw no photo shot @200mm&F2.8 in this gallery.

Indeed. One of the biggest problems of the previous gen lens is focus breathing so at "200mm" it is actually much less than that in reality (135mm?). This greatly reduces the ability of the older lens to isolate background .

Link | Posted on Feb 2, 2017 at 17:48 UTC
On article Sony SLT a99 II Review (1560 comments in total)
In reply to:

TheEmrys: "The biggest mistake with this new menu system, especially with the daunting growth of settings, is the lack of a customizable quick menu to save frequently changed settings"

Isn't this what the FN menu button does,described just below this quote?

"This main menu is used alongside a user-configurable Fn menu. This allows up to twelve options to be arranged in up to two rows of icons, for semi-fast access to features you access or settings you change semi-regularly."

I work in a biology lab where we assess and use microscopes from different companies. We have chosen the confocal from Leica (over those made by Nikon, Zeiss, & Olympus) because its software is user-friendly (pictorially-driven controls) and there is a good balance between automation vs user-defined settings. Other softwares are text based, heavy with layers of submenu which are further complicated by many pull down menus. The point is that at the end, they are all equally powerful and versatile, but a good UI design can make complicated things simple. Remember, it takes a genius to make complicated things simple, but fools will make simple things complicated.

Link | Posted on Jan 31, 2017 at 20:25 UTC
On article Sony SLT a99 II Review (1560 comments in total)
In reply to:

TheEmrys: "The biggest mistake with this new menu system, especially with the daunting growth of settings, is the lack of a customizable quick menu to save frequently changed settings"

Isn't this what the FN menu button does,described just below this quote?

"This main menu is used alongside a user-configurable Fn menu. This allows up to twelve options to be arranged in up to two rows of icons, for semi-fast access to features you access or settings you change semi-regularly."

More buttons is not the only answer. Have you seen the remote of an Apple TV as compared to a typical remote? By an icon-based design on screen, they eliminate 90% of the buttons and make the TV much easier to control. In the film days, cameras were simple — aperture control is on the lens, intuitively located on the device that it controls. There is one dial on the camera body for shutter speed, and another one for ISO. That was it. (If the auto-ISO can be more intelligently designed, even the ISO dial/button can be eliminated for modern cameras) The designers of most modern cameras have forgotten (or not aware of) the key elements of photography and simply flooded the cameras with controls, settings, as they see fit. There is no reason why the original iPhone CAN have just one button — how were we supposed to type ... Leica is one of the few companies working hard to simplify UIs and I hope they can succeed.

Link | Posted on Jan 31, 2017 at 20:15 UTC
On article Sony SLT a99 II Review (1560 comments in total)
In reply to:

OlyPent: USB 2.00000ooooooooo? Good thing most people take the card out of the camera for file transfers.

USB2? Hey, people still love the headphone jack. :)

Link | Posted on Jan 31, 2017 at 18:41 UTC
On article Sony SLT a99 II Review (1560 comments in total)
In reply to:

TheEmrys: "The biggest mistake with this new menu system, especially with the daunting growth of settings, is the lack of a customizable quick menu to save frequently changed settings"

Isn't this what the FN menu button does,described just below this quote?

"This main menu is used alongside a user-configurable Fn menu. This allows up to twelve options to be arranged in up to two rows of icons, for semi-fast access to features you access or settings you change semi-regularly."

As Apple has tried to remove buttons to simplify UIs, adding more and more Fn buttons is going the opposite, which in my opinion is a sign of laziness in the designers. The biggest problem with Fn buttons is the lack of way to label what they are. Unless you use these Fn daily, once they are set, their functions will be quickly forgotten a few days, weeks, or months when you pick up the camera again. The "My Menu" concept used primarily in Nikon's cameras is a good one in the mean time.

Link | Posted on Jan 31, 2017 at 18:38 UTC
In reply to:

samfan: Nice. Personally I'd opt for the Panasonic 20mm lens as I much prefer the 40-45mm focal length. It may seem like a small difference but both 35mm and 50mm feel weird to me. 42mm in particular is just right. Whatever camera system with a zoom lens I use, I noticed I very often tend to zoom to around the 42mm equivalent as neither wider nor narrower seem right. Funny that but it's true.

There used to be good 45mm pancake lens for FF but there is none in the digital age.

Link | Posted on Jan 27, 2017 at 23:11 UTC

The myth of the 50 mm focal length: is it really the most versatile because it most closely resembles human vision or is there something else, despite it was made famous by Henri Cartier-Bresson? The former does not appear to be true as many seem to agree that 35-40mm focal length is closer to human vision. In my opinion, the 50mm was chosen in part because it is the lens that is the least expensive to be made fast and small. Take Nikon for example, its 50mm f1.8G is $216 (185 g) while the 35/1.8G is $527 (305g). Back in the film days (Henri's days), all cameras were sold with the 50mm lens as a "kit lens." Thus the popularity of the 50mm lens may be due mostly to cost and size with its good enough focal length thrown in at the end.

Link | Posted on Jan 27, 2017 at 18:06 UTC as 30th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

BobT3218: For travel, surely the M.ZD 25mm f2 would have been a better choice. It's half the size and a third the weight. One looses weather proofing and 1.5 stops but one saves size, weight and heaps of dollars.

Or the Panasonic 20/1.7, which will give a slightly wider and very useful perspective.

Link | Posted on Jan 26, 2017 at 22:37 UTC
Total: 346, showing: 1 – 20
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