G1Houston

Lives in United States Houston, United States
Joined on Jul 15, 2009

Comments

Total: 375, showing: 1 – 20
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wish there were more shot at 12 mm wide open. At 12mm f2.8, the 12-35/2.8 is soft in the corners, and I hope this lens can do better. I wish there were more shots at 12 mm period.

Link | Posted on Jul 16, 2017 at 19:06 UTC as 8th comment
On article Review: Nikon D7500, speed and capability (449 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jorginho: Short version; about the best price/performance ratio any DSLR gets you on the market.

"The D750 gets you ..."

A bigger and heavier and more expensive camera, bigger, heavier and more expensive lenses, AF points that only cover mostly the central region of the field ...

Link | Posted on Jul 6, 2017 at 16:15 UTC
On article Finishing the line: Nikon 28mm F1.4E ED sample gallery (128 comments in total)

Wow! Sharpness aside, rich saturated color plus a very nice bokeh for such a wide lens. It is an outstanding lens with a price and heft to match.

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2017 at 14:25 UTC as 23rd comment
In reply to:

dash2k8: I love my iPads but have long given up trying to draw on this surface. I have over 30 years drawing experience and thus am married to the texture of real paper. A glossy surface just doesn't do it for me. I will, however, continue to upgrade my iPads at every-other generation and use them for recreational purposes. Can't beat the eye candy.

"t doesn't seem like it would be that hard for someone to produce a screen protector ..."

There are if you search:

http://www.cultofmac.com/476861/make-ipad-pro-feel-like-paper-cover/

However for those who have never tried Apple Pencil before, this is not your typical "stylus" writing on glass, and you should give it a try.

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2017 at 19:11 UTC
In reply to:

Light Pilgrim: I have the original 9,7" iPad Pro, it is nice, but not as nice as using a pen and paper. Question. Are there any changes to the Apple Pencil? Is it still the same or there is an upgraded version of it?
Aside from a bigger and brighter screen, is there anything game changing?

What do you use the pencil for? For me doing regular stuff, writing down notes, a few simple drawings, annotating things, it works really well. The latency is more noticeable in the Office app, but in native Apple app, or some third party app, such as Notability, it works well.

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2017 at 19:04 UTC
On article First shots from new Nikon 28mm F1.4E ED (224 comments in total)

In some of the desert shots, you can see even the corners are sharp with this lens at f1.4. It is indeed impressive, so we do get what we pay for, although this is not a lens for me.

Link | Posted on Jun 2, 2017 at 20:32 UTC as 29th comment
In reply to:

Androole: Very good price on this one.

The price that Olympus charges for its 9-18mm starts to look worse and worse compared to the rest of the market...

"Seriously? What does the price of a completely different format lens, let alone a just announced and untested one, have to do with the price of an Olympus lens?"

Because people cross-shop between Nikon's D3xxx series and m4/3!

Link | Posted on Jun 1, 2017 at 15:32 UTC
In reply to:

Prairie Pal: Released just to keep Thom Hogan off their backs. ;/
But seriously I think this is a welcomed lens, given the VR.
At Cdn$450 I'm not expecting spectacular IQ, but we may be surprised.
I agree with another comment that it's a great alternative to the Olympus 9-18 in that it may keep the APS-C wide angle kit compact enough for a lot of people to keep their stake in Nikon ground.

Thom has been complaining about, and which I agree, is the lack of small, light weight, fast wide PRIME lenses. There are already several zoom lenses on the market covering the 10ish - 20ish focal length, most are slow. Where is a 16mm f1.8 lens? 14/1.8? Due to good ISO performance, even a f2.8 version will be highly valuable, provided that it will be much cheaper and smaller. I really don't see why we should get too excited by another wide slow zoom lens. It is an E lens, which is good, but there is still no fast wide prime lens for the DX.

Link | Posted on Jun 1, 2017 at 15:27 UTC
In reply to:

Faris Marino: 23 1.8 please

I can take a f2.8 if they can make it a pancake!

Link | Posted on Jun 1, 2017 at 15:22 UTC
In reply to:

GEONYC: Where is the price of the 10-20, and why does it NEED VR? Actually it doesn't even need AF, just set it at 10Ft at F8 @800 ISO and you can shoot all day without touching it.

"why does it NEED VR? "

Ans: hand-held video!

Link | Posted on Jun 1, 2017 at 15:21 UTC
In reply to:

fPrime: The ONLY value a full frame Nikon mirrorless body would have for me would be an improved ability to mount and focus classic legacy lenses from any and all manufacturers via an adapter (like Sony mirrorless cameras offer). As such, I'm ok with a new mount that's both wider and shorter. If that requires me to also use an adapter for my old F-mount lenses, no big deal.

"to mount and focus classic legacy lenses from any and all manufacturers via an adapter"

But for the general consumers, the last thing they want to do is to buy old lenses and focus them manually on a brand new fancy FF digital camera that can do so much more with a fully compatible lens. While the use of adapted lens can be attractive to the relatively (very) few people who already own such lenses and do not need AF, for the rest this is a "problem" to be addressed. In the early days of m4/3 before there was an authentic fast 50mm "portrait lens," there were many many discussion in the forum on how wonderful a particular "legacy" 50 mm MF lens is. Many testimonials, many test shots, many heated debates ... Once the $200-ish Olympus 45/1.8 came out, all these discussions quickly disappeared. People love to the use the lens that the system is designed for, provided that it is priced right.

Link | Posted on May 23, 2017 at 16:07 UTC
On article Sony FE 100mm F2.8 STF gallery and first impressions (316 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: T5.6? Really? Forget about low light. Sad. I hope it's at least super-cheap...
Wait a minute! $1,500!?!? Ya gotta be kidding me. One-trick pony of no use to low-light shooters. Jeez. For this kind of cash, a Zeiss Milvus 100mm f2 does a lot more. Heck, even an adapted Canon 100mm f2 for $500 looks more useful. Or a Canon 135mm f2 on a Metabones...

To the OP: it seems obvious that this IS a speciality lens, but do you know what it is designed for? It is my understanding that this lens can blur the background to a degree that often is only achievable by a much longer lens (eg. >200mm, due to compression), and yet it can also deliver more DOF (because after all it is a 100mm lens) to get more important stuff in focus. It does marry the advantages of both a long and short lens in efficiently blurring the background. I can see this is lens will be great for serious portrait and wedding photographers who can afford but this is not for every body.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2017 at 14:37 UTC
On article Sony FE 100mm F2.8 STF gallery and first impressions (316 comments in total)
In reply to:

G1Houston: How does it compare to the bokeh generated by iPhone 7-plus?

Someday digital camera should be able to *automatically* take a series of photos at different focal points, relative to the subject, and reassemble the images to allow post-adjustments to achieve the desirable bokeh. When that becomes a reality, these specially built (and pricy) lenses with lots of compromises will no longer be needed. Of course the key is to collect and process the images "automatically" that the camera can determine the two focal points between which the images should be acquired relative to the subject of interest, and then process the images quickly post-capture. In addition, there should be powerful software tools in and out of camera to allow users adjusting the bokeh and to pick the one we like. In the mean time, I look forward to Apple's next iPhone with an improved camera system to see what they can do with a smartphone.

Compromises? Loss of light in low light, inaccurate and slow AF in low light, size, and price ($1500). These are not enough?

Yes, I heard of Lytro, but they did not make a main stream product. You have to give Apple a lot of credits for getting it so close in a main stream smartphone that can do so much more not just photography.

An integrated approach combining software and camera hardware can allow *any* lens to optimize background blur for both portrait and macro photography.

Link | Posted on May 9, 2017 at 19:18 UTC
On article Sony FE 100mm F2.8 STF gallery and first impressions (316 comments in total)
In reply to:

Bombastic: Interesting addition to Sony's lens layout.
How does this compare to Nikon and Canon''s soft focus offerings? This one is much more expensive?

$1,500. To me it is very expensive.

Link | Posted on May 9, 2017 at 14:43 UTC
On article Sony FE 100mm F2.8 STF gallery and first impressions (316 comments in total)

How does it compare to the bokeh generated by iPhone 7-plus?

Someday digital camera should be able to *automatically* take a series of photos at different focal points, relative to the subject, and reassemble the images to allow post-adjustments to achieve the desirable bokeh. When that becomes a reality, these specially built (and pricy) lenses with lots of compromises will no longer be needed. Of course the key is to collect and process the images "automatically" that the camera can determine the two focal points between which the images should be acquired relative to the subject of interest, and then process the images quickly post-capture. In addition, there should be powerful software tools in and out of camera to allow users adjusting the bokeh and to pick the one we like. In the mean time, I look forward to Apple's next iPhone with an improved camera system to see what they can do with a smartphone.

Link | Posted on May 9, 2017 at 14:40 UTC as 58th comment | 7 replies
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2724 comments in total)
In reply to:

Peiasdf: I think the most amazing thing is SONY hired so many people to run and jump for reviewers to demonstrate their flagship and latest tech while Olympus fly people out to Iceland to shoot snow and gray sky using E-M1 II

Olympus most brilliant marketing effort was to invite "ordinary" people to shoot US Open using E-P1 and created a web site to show case all these, well, ordinary photos to demonstrate that E-p1 *can* shoot sports.

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2017 at 19:46 UTC
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2724 comments in total)
In reply to:

Edmond Leung: Hope we can see 1 to 2 Sony cameras in next Olympic Games..... But Sony's weak services, supports and marketing team are their biggest limiting factors. Sony need the talents from Canon and Nikon to run their business.

"I absolutely couldn't recall anything about that except it was bad."
That was the impression of many people including me. The camera he used was a G5. The gallery has apparently been taken down since I could not find it any where.

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2017 at 14:48 UTC
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2724 comments in total)
In reply to:

G1Houston: Impressive IQ and auto-focus. If SONY can build up the lens needed for indoor sports photography, the A9 will be a complete alternative system that can compete with a dSLR based system, at least at technical levels. I believe one can also extract stills from 4k videos from A9 to further increase the chance of capturing decisive moments, making it possible to get both video and stills in the same shooting, a great advantage of a mirrorless system.

However what else can the A9 do to compete with CanNikon? For the targeted users, the small reduction in camera size is not consequential. A mirrorless camera is supposed to be cheaper to make, but A 9 is more expensive. Why would anybody switch, unless, they already invest in the SONY system? My worry with this is that by focusing so much on the high end, e.g., to produce pro quality lenses for sports, we will end up with fewer quality but inexpensive lenses for the masses. The SONY system as a whole is too expensive for most.

I was not accurate about the price of camera body; thank you for pointing out. May be not a fair comparison in terms of sensor size, Nikon D500 is a pro tool for sports and much cheaper for sure. But in general it is expensive to get into SONY because of the cost of the lens.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 22:05 UTC
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2724 comments in total)

Impressive IQ and auto-focus. If SONY can build up the lens needed for indoor sports photography, the A9 will be a complete alternative system that can compete with a dSLR based system, at least at technical levels. I believe one can also extract stills from 4k videos from A9 to further increase the chance of capturing decisive moments, making it possible to get both video and stills in the same shooting, a great advantage of a mirrorless system.

However what else can the A9 do to compete with CanNikon? For the targeted users, the small reduction in camera size is not consequential. A mirrorless camera is supposed to be cheaper to make, but A 9 is more expensive. Why would anybody switch, unless, they already invest in the SONY system? My worry with this is that by focusing so much on the high end, e.g., to produce pro quality lenses for sports, we will end up with fewer quality but inexpensive lenses for the masses. The SONY system as a whole is too expensive for most.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 17:29 UTC as 320th comment | 13 replies
On article Nikon D7500 vs Nikon D500: Which is better for you? (397 comments in total)
In reply to:

Marty4650: Obviously, the D500 is "better" and it should be because it costs quite a bit more.

But if you don't need the faster speed and better AF, then the D7500 looks like a much better deal. And the truth is, most of us don't need really them, even if some people do.

Nikon is simply giving their customers more options by offering four different APSC DSLRs, at four different price points, with four different feature sets. And all four are pretty good choices within their respective classes.

(D3xxx, D5xxx, D7xxx, and D5xx).

"Too many models, a lot of unsold inventory."
My opinion too. I am not sure if D3xxx makes sense here, they should just get rid of it and make D5xxx the entry model. In addition, I read that there is a trend in Japanese electronic industry that all companies are putting out a "new" model every year as a way to be competitive. Obviously most of these "new" models are minor revisions of last year's models (sounds familiar?). With the launch of "new" models, older ones get discounted, making them more attractive to buy which in turn suppresses the sale of the new ones. This is also a great waste of R&D money, making it even more difficult to make a new model that really matters.

Link | Posted on Apr 13, 2017 at 17:22 UTC
Total: 375, showing: 1 – 20
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