fieldray

Lives in United States CA, United States
Joined on Jan 2, 2008

Comments

Total: 14, showing: 1 – 14

I really like the look I get using my old Nikkor 180mm F2.8 AI-s lens. Also a 35mm f/1.4 AI-s, although it has a generous amount of chromatic aberration. I have made some beautiful environmental portraits with it.

Link | Posted on Feb 6, 2021 at 17:26 UTC as 182nd comment | 1 reply
On a photo in the Fujifilm GFX 100S pre-production sample gallery (DPReview TV) sample gallery (11 comments in total)
In reply to:

blåland: Can film simulation be turned off?

I have to say that this portrait is a winner! Maybe you should do more still photography, Jordan?

Link | Posted on Feb 1, 2021 at 03:39 UTC

Is this done in standard RGB 3 color spectral resolution? Seems like a study like this would benefit more from additional spectral resolution rather than 1.1 micrometer spatial resolution. I am curious how this is being used and would be interested in a discussion with these folks on this subject.

Link | Posted on Jan 21, 2021 at 19:21 UTC as 32nd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

fieldray: Thank you, Roger! I really appreciate your easy to understand approach to communicating things technical, even though I was raised on Born & Wolf, Malacara, Warren Smith, etc. A question: I am pretty sure field curvature is mostly determined by lens design rather than manufacturing, but as for field tilt - have you seen tilt change in a lens over time? I have suspected this, but it might just be that I am focusing in different regions of the curved field at different times.

Thanks for the clarification, RCicala and J A C S. This experience is only with zoom lenses which have not been dropped or impacted, so I don't think there is any static change involved. The only variables I know about are zoom position, focus position, thermal environment, and location of focus in the field. I think I'll pay closer attention to where and how I am focusing in the FOV to see if my image characteristics have more consistency.

Link | Posted on Jan 12, 2021 at 01:22 UTC

Thank you, Roger! I really appreciate your easy to understand approach to communicating things technical, even though I was raised on Born & Wolf, Malacara, Warren Smith, etc. A question: I am pretty sure field curvature is mostly determined by lens design rather than manufacturing, but as for field tilt - have you seen tilt change in a lens over time? I have suspected this, but it might just be that I am focusing in different regions of the curved field at different times.

Link | Posted on Jan 11, 2021 at 22:02 UTC as 36th comment | 6 replies

My first “good” camera was a Pentax H1a, which was the budget version of the predecessor of the Spotmatic. I got this camera for my 13th birthday in 1967 and while I don’t own the camera any more I still cherish some of the photographs I took with it. I got it with the wonderful 55mm f2.0 Takumar lens, and added no-name 35mm and 135mm lenses to make a set.

Link | Posted on Oct 2, 2020 at 14:43 UTC as 60th comment

I had an elephant squirt muddy water on my Nikon Z7 through its trunk while I was in Thailand last year. No problems resulted! I’m pretty sure I saw the other elephants laughing...

Link | Posted on Sep 1, 2020 at 01:22 UTC as 29th comment
In reply to:

Leicalika: had the Mamiya c330, never thought much of it, preferred Yashica 124g, but there's much better than both out there,

I sold my RB67 because my wife’s blink reflex was consistently faster than the RB67 shutter action! Got a Hasselblad and I am grateful that I didn’t sell it - I have been using it a lot recently. The gear I most regret getting rid of was my darkroom equipment, including a Beseler MCRX 4x5 enlarger and film developing equipment for 35mm, 120, and 4x5. That stuff would come in handy in these days of protective isolation!

Link | Posted on May 26, 2020 at 00:06 UTC
In reply to:

fieldray: My first Nikon was a Nikkormat FTn in 1969. I photographed the Sapporo Olympics with that and a Nikon F in 1972 - manual focus, manual match needle exposure, manual film advance, high ISO (then ASA) of 400. Photographing the bobsleds, I would hear them whoosh around a turn above me, count to three, and fire the shutter, because they were going too fast to react to visually when you could finally see them! I got many wonderful photos with these cameras, and was really happy with them. I had no expectation of auto focus, auto exposure, auto advance, ISO 25,000, instant review, lenses so well corrected that you expect corner to corner sharpness used wide open! One word of caution based on personal experience - if your camera is sitting on the shelf for an extended period of time, take the batteries out. Eventually they can sometimes leak and ruin a great camera!

yes you can still get batteries for a Nikormat FT3

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2020 at 20:03 UTC

My first Nikon was a Nikkormat FTn in 1969. I photographed the Sapporo Olympics with that and a Nikon F in 1972 - manual focus, manual match needle exposure, manual film advance, high ISO (then ASA) of 400. Photographing the bobsleds, I would hear them whoosh around a turn above me, count to three, and fire the shutter, because they were going too fast to react to visually when you could finally see them! I got many wonderful photos with these cameras, and was really happy with them. I had no expectation of auto focus, auto exposure, auto advance, ISO 25,000, instant review, lenses so well corrected that you expect corner to corner sharpness used wide open! One word of caution based on personal experience - if your camera is sitting on the shelf for an extended period of time, take the batteries out. Eventually they can sometimes leak and ruin a great camera!

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2020 at 16:21 UTC as 67th comment | 6 replies

For many years a 35mm F/2.0 Ai manual focus lens was the default lens on my Nikons. When I went to autofocus, I was disappointed with the image quality of the new D lens so it didn’t get so much love. I have enjoyed the F1.4 G lens for a long time, but for some reason it has not stayed on my camera much. Now I am really happy with the Nikon S 35mm lens for the Z cameras and I have returned to relying on this as a starting point much of the time!

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2020 at 16:59 UTC as 90th comment

Richard, thank you for an excellently written, excellently illustrated article. I have see people tackle one or another of the aspects of Bayer array imaging, but it is very helpful to see this all in one concise article. What are your rules for propagating this if I want to use it as a teaching aid?

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2017 at 02:13 UTC as 22nd comment
In reply to:

bcalkins: Sounds promising!

88 db is equivalent to 29.2 stops. This is the ratio between the saturated signal level which determines the highest useful level and the sensor noise level which determines the lowest useful signal level. The sensitivity factor of 1.2 relates the efficiency of converting light into electrical signal. This means that the CMOS sensor needs 20% more light to "see" with the same image quality (signal to noise ratio) as this new approach. These 2 sensor characteristics can be independent of each other.

Link | Posted on Jun 12, 2013 at 16:07 UTC
On article Bell Labs creates lensless single-pixel camera (57 comments in total)

This is also known as coded aperture imaging which has been around for awhile. Luckily for us, somebody invented the focusing lens to sample the light field simultaneously, transform the field to an angular field map, and somebody else invented a sensor array to also sample the angular field map simultaneously! Very clever. Of course you still have to sample this field at multiple depth points to get the full image information. Stereo photography is another creative combination of these approaches that provides some depth information (no 3d wavefront information) but still does most of the sampling simultaneously.

Link | Posted on Jun 5, 2013 at 14:56 UTC as 10th comment | 1 reply
Total: 14, showing: 1 – 14