SantaFeBill

Lives in United States Santa Fe, USA, United States
Works as a Retired
Joined on Apr 28, 2005

Comments

Total: 97, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

SantaFeBill: Given the large number of users still on Win7, it's strange to me that X2 only runs on 8 & 10. Given the number of programs that run on both 7 & 8 (and often 10 as well), I wonder why they made this choice, what features exclusive to 8 & 10 they found so essential that they've abandoned the Win 7 market.
They are obviously not concerned about sales volume.

@Grzegorz Interesting. Here's what their site says:
"Microsoft Windows users need Windows 8 64-bit or newer". 'Newer' of course is Win10. I wonder if you'll find at some point that something doesn't work right under 7?

Link | Posted on Sep 28, 2016 at 13:39 UTC

Given the large number of users still on Win7, it's strange to me that X2 only runs on 8 & 10. Given the number of programs that run on both 7 & 8 (and often 10 as well), I wonder why they made this choice, what features exclusive to 8 & 10 they found so essential that they've abandoned the Win 7 market.
They are obviously not concerned about sales volume.

Link | Posted on Sep 27, 2016 at 20:56 UTC as 4th comment | 7 replies

Seems a very attractive camera. But why still no GPS? I find GPS very nice for locating those travel shots where the image doesn't immediately call to my mind where it was taken. Both my Nikons have GPS with 3rd-party units that write GPS data to the metadata as the picture is taken.
Yes, I know you can use sw and hw that records GPS data and then can be used to sync at a later time to the camera's metadata. But it's more trouble and, from what I've read, isn't always successful.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 18:02 UTC as 1st comment
On article Sony offers E PZ 18-110mm F4 G OSS for Super 35mm/APS-C (128 comments in total)

I'd thought cine lenses needed to be T-stops. Is that now not so important since the media is now digital rather than film?

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2016 at 18:43 UTC as 9th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Frank C.: neutrino coating? like the trillions passing through my body as we speak? interesting...

Since neutrinos can't adhere to anything, the coating won't be very effective ... . Seriously, I'd be very hesitant to buy a product from a company that has demonstrated such a lack of knowledge of basic science - or contempt for consumers' intelligence.

Link | Posted on Sep 8, 2016 at 19:34 UTC

I know nothing about 3D printing, but are there really 3D printers that can create an object out of metal? That would take quite high temperatures. Perhaps tool shop or metal fabrication plants versions ... .

Link | Posted on Aug 29, 2016 at 19:58 UTC as 27th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

camcom12: For many reasons publishing video of national parks is a good thing, especially for those who may never get the opportunity to visit a particular park(s) in their lifetime. It's a great way to showcase the park system, the wonders of our world, with educational, social & environmental benefits.
Negatives are two-fold:
1) If one plans to visit a particular park, I might refrain from watching the videos, as it may 'spoil' the rewards of personal discovery, being a new place, & the awe that one experiences of actually being there. The downside risk being "...wow, it looked a lot better in the videos!...."
2) Speculation: As more public lands are being closed to human travel and activity, in part due to zealots who believe humans should not visit wild & open areas, high-res videos serve as a precursor to limiting visitation in virtual reality only. This could be exploited as a step in that direction. Yes this sound like science fiction, but in limited instances is already taking place.

Having been to both Carlsbad Caverns and Bryce parks, and Alaska fjords (tho' not Kenai), I can assure all that videos, including these - stunning as they are - still do not compare to being there.

Link | Posted on Aug 26, 2016 at 00:48 UTC
In reply to:

cgarrard: Whoever sent her that email, probably doesn't have a job now. :)

"There is nothing inherently immoral about capitalism." Yes, there is. In capitalism per se, the only worth a human being has is his/her relation to capital - either how much they have or how much they can help someone else amass more.
I agree that there are moral capitalists. But they are so because they honor moral values from some other source than capitalism - religion, humanism, a concern for the greatest good, simple concern for other human beings. None of these values are found within capitalism as such.

Link | Posted on Jul 29, 2016 at 01:55 UTC
In reply to:

cgarrard: Whoever sent her that email, probably doesn't have a job now. :)

Or got promoted. Remember, in capitalism, it's not how you make your money, but how much money you make.

Link | Posted on Jul 28, 2016 at 22:03 UTC
In reply to:

VidJa: Sad, but expected. Its the same as the old steam age. Massive beautiful machines, but we're rolling along in hybrids and full electric cars these days. And to be honest, digital opened up a whole new can of artists, just because now they can afford it.

"And regular people can now afford getting family and other pictures too, not just the elite." Guess if you're young enough you don't know, but 'regular people' had for most of the last century been able to afford getting 'family and other pictures' using film. I still have a few, dating back to the 1930's, taken by my parents, family and friends, plus ones I took from the late 1950's. It didn't take digital. And we were definitely not of the 'elite'.

Link | Posted on Jun 28, 2016 at 01:50 UTC
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1196 comments in total)
In reply to:

eya1: Pricing is not much more than pro Canikon bodies and lenses but IQ is probably through the roof . Will this be a mirrorless game-changer? It will be interesting to see the long-term effect this technology has on the camera industry as a whole.

All I need is a whole lot of money; a whole lot of processing power and, a whole lotta Rosie!!!

"Pricing is not much more than pro Canikon bodies and lenses ... "
Well, at B&H a Nikon 810 body plus the 50mm f/1.4, plus the 105mm macro comes to a total of U.S. $4091.
The 2-lens X1d kit is U.S. $13,985. That's a difference of $9894. Power to you if that's "not much more" of a difference. And of course the normal lens for the 810 is good for low-light, the 105 has stabilization, the body has a 1/8000 top shutter speed ... . Oh, and the 810 is also compatible with Nikon speedlights. <g>

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 16:25 UTC
On article Hasselblad to announce 'game changer' next week (460 comments in total)

Let's parse the language - 'a game changer in the world of photography'. Not 'in the world of professional photography', 'in the world of medium-format digital photography', but just 'the world of photography' - the whole enchilada. That, shall we say, is a rather large claim.
Since I'm part of 'the world of photography', it claims that it will be a 'game changer' for me. I very much doubt that it will.

Link | Posted on Jun 20, 2016 at 15:40 UTC as 37th comment | 1 reply

I don't understand a guide number of '60m'. (I assume that means '60 meters'.) From my manual flash days, I think I remember that a GN was a unit-less number. You found the GN of the unit for the ISO of the film you were using, determined (or guessed :-) ) the distance to the subject, and then divided the distance into the GN to find the f/stop.
Do I have this wrong?

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2016 at 04:59 UTC as 16th comment | 1 reply

Do I have this right? If it's really 360, then it records also an image of what it's siting on - a rock or rough concrete in the case of the picture. I guess it could be be edited out ... . Or is it 369 only in a horizontal plane?

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2016 at 01:05 UTC as 12th comment | 1 reply
On article Opinion: Pour one out for Samsung cameras (324 comments in total)
In reply to:

SantaFeBill: Fridge with an inside video camera? Stove that you can talk to with a smartphone? (I have always wanted to carry on a conversation with my stove, and so much exiting goes on inside my fridge - might have to start assigning ratings to the videos.)
They think they'll sell more of these than an excellent camera? They'd make more money selling what they're smoking. :-)

@Revenant: They'll certainly sell more fridges than they would have cameras, but pay extra for a fridge with a video camera? Guess it will depend on how many people want to verify that the light goes out when you close the door ... .

Link | Posted on Jan 9, 2016 at 02:24 UTC
On article Opinion: Pour one out for Samsung cameras (324 comments in total)

Fridge with an inside video camera? Stove that you can talk to with a smartphone? (I have always wanted to carry on a conversation with my stove, and so much exiting goes on inside my fridge - might have to start assigning ratings to the videos.)
They think they'll sell more of these than an excellent camera? They'd make more money selling what they're smoking. :-)

Link | Posted on Jan 8, 2016 at 22:57 UTC as 16th comment | 5 replies
On article Kodak revives Super 8 with part-digital cine camera (367 comments in total)
In reply to:

Provia_fan: Still a lot of disinformed comments here. What I seem to see here is a lot of people who are scared of the.medium because they would actually have to know what they are doing because the scattergun approach they are used with digital is not there.
And no, digitally applying a Super8 effect doesn't cut it. There are a variety of films with different characteristics and developing processes will add even more to these variables.
Most of you are also not aware of the popularity of the medium
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_8_film

"Amateur usage of Super 8 has been largely replaced by video, but the format is often used by professionals in music videos, TV commercials, and special sequences for television and feature film projects, as well as by many visual artists. For a professional cinematographer, Super 8 is another tool to use alongside larger formats. Some seek to imitate the look of old home movies, or create a stylishly grainy look. Many independent filmmakers such as Derek Jarman, Dave Markey, Sean Pecknold, Jem Cohen, Damon Packard, Sam Raimi, Jesse Richards, Harmony Korine, Teod Richter, Jörg Buttgereit, Nathan Schiff and Guy Maddin have made extensive use of 8 mm film. Oliver Stone, for example, has used it several times in his more recent films, such as The Doors, Natural Born Killers, Nixon, U Turn, and JFK where his director of photography Robert Richardson employed it to evoke a period or to give a different look to scenes. The PBS series Globe Trekker uses approximately five minutes of Super 8 footage per episode. [15] In the UK, broadcasters such as the BBC still occasionally make use of Super 8 in both drama and documentary contexts, usually for creative effect. A recent example of particular note was the 2005 BBC2 documentary series, Define Normal, which was shot largely on Super 8, with only interviews and special timelapse photography utilising more conventional digital formats.[16] Most recently, John Mellencamp's 2011 documentary film, It's About You, was shot entirely in Super-8."

Bring it on Kodak!

@MeganV: "(3) Kodak themselves say that this new camera is mostly intended for education, film school / institutional, and professional use. (http://www.kodak.com/ek/US/en/corp/press_center/Kodak_Launches_Super_8_Filmmaking_Revival_Initiative_at_CES_2016/default.htm)"
Thanks for the clarification. I wish DPR had made this clear in its article - would have saved a good bit of posting space. :-)

Link | Posted on Jan 8, 2016 at 14:57 UTC
On article Kodak revives Super 8 with part-digital cine camera (367 comments in total)
In reply to:

Provia_fan: Still a lot of disinformed comments here. What I seem to see here is a lot of people who are scared of the.medium because they would actually have to know what they are doing because the scattergun approach they are used with digital is not there.
And no, digitally applying a Super8 effect doesn't cut it. There are a variety of films with different characteristics and developing processes will add even more to these variables.
Most of you are also not aware of the popularity of the medium
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_8_film

"Amateur usage of Super 8 has been largely replaced by video, but the format is often used by professionals in music videos, TV commercials, and special sequences for television and feature film projects, as well as by many visual artists. For a professional cinematographer, Super 8 is another tool to use alongside larger formats. Some seek to imitate the look of old home movies, or create a stylishly grainy look. Many independent filmmakers such as Derek Jarman, Dave Markey, Sean Pecknold, Jem Cohen, Damon Packard, Sam Raimi, Jesse Richards, Harmony Korine, Teod Richter, Jörg Buttgereit, Nathan Schiff and Guy Maddin have made extensive use of 8 mm film. Oliver Stone, for example, has used it several times in his more recent films, such as The Doors, Natural Born Killers, Nixon, U Turn, and JFK where his director of photography Robert Richardson employed it to evoke a period or to give a different look to scenes. The PBS series Globe Trekker uses approximately five minutes of Super 8 footage per episode. [15] In the UK, broadcasters such as the BBC still occasionally make use of Super 8 in both drama and documentary contexts, usually for creative effect. A recent example of particular note was the 2005 BBC2 documentary series, Define Normal, which was shot largely on Super 8, with only interviews and special timelapse photography utilising more conventional digital formats.[16] Most recently, John Mellencamp's 2011 documentary film, It's About You, was shot entirely in Super-8."

Bring it on Kodak!

@Provia_fan: If I understand the implication of what you said, then this new Kodak Super 8 is _not_ intended for the amateur home movie market, as Super 8 originally was, but for those professionals using it in creative and professional ways.
The pricing of the cartridges would seem to indicate that focus.
But a question: Given the wide usage you cite, do not these professionals already have Super 8 equipment - and, I'd guess, equipment a good bit more capable than the Kodak offering?

Link | Posted on Jan 8, 2016 at 00:32 UTC
On article Kodak revives Super 8 with part-digital cine camera (367 comments in total)
In reply to:

SantaFeBill: If Kodak wants to revive film, bring back Kodachrome and its processing. _That_ would cause me to dig out my Nikon F (yes, 'F') and associated lenses from the closet.

@Joe: It would be interesting to know where they thought they'd get it processed, assuming they actually use it to shoot. AFAIK, the last K chrome processing lab has shut down. That's why I said " ... and its processing". One w.o. the other doesn't get you much.

Link | Posted on Jan 7, 2016 at 21:55 UTC
On article Kodak revives Super 8 with part-digital cine camera (367 comments in total)
In reply to:

landscaper1: No, Dzacco, it isn't just you.

Why would any semi-intelligent person think that tens of millions of consumers, having been exposed for a decade or longer to the convenience of "digital film" would now be convinced to want to return to celluloid to make their family movies?

This smells like a desperate attempt at Kodak to revive a section of their business (making consumer-grade celluloid image recording materials) that technology has clearly left in the dust.

If I were a Kodak stockholder, I'd be howling for someone's hide to be nailed to the big yellow barnyard wall.

@Stu 8: Granted that a good number of commercial movies are still shot on film. But Super 8?

Link | Posted on Jan 7, 2016 at 16:19 UTC
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