Thin_Ice

Lives in Belgium Belgium
Joined on Sep 24, 2010

Comments

Total: 7, showing: 1 – 7
In reply to:

Thin_Ice: This is the camera i learned to take pictures with as a 6 year old kid. I still remember that it took a fall from about 5 m height while rock climbing because of the failure of one of the strap clips. Just small dents in the body but it didn’t even needed a repair.

As a student i took the camera to iceland in 1992. Battery went dead, but i did a great job in guessing the correct exposure. I think it has never been used since that trip. I have to go and check it out when the lockout is over.

Great memory’s!

Oh, i forgot to mention: the QC sticker is still on. I am sure about that.

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2020 at 18:35 UTC

This is the camera i learned to take pictures with as a 6 year old kid. I still remember that it took a fall from about 5 m height while rock climbing because of the failure of one of the strap clips. Just small dents in the body but it didn’t even needed a repair.

As a student i took the camera to iceland in 1992. Battery went dead, but i did a great job in guessing the correct exposure. I think it has never been used since that trip. I have to go and check it out when the lockout is over.

Great memory’s!

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2020 at 18:34 UTC as 59th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

fieldray: My first Nikon was a Nikkormat FTn in 1969. I photographed the Sapporo Olympics with that and a Nikon F in 1972 - manual focus, manual match needle exposure, manual film advance, high ISO (then ASA) of 400. Photographing the bobsleds, I would hear them whoosh around a turn above me, count to three, and fire the shutter, because they were going too fast to react to visually when you could finally see them! I got many wonderful photos with these cameras, and was really happy with them. I had no expectation of auto focus, auto exposure, auto advance, ISO 25,000, instant review, lenses so well corrected that you expect corner to corner sharpness used wide open! One word of caution based on personal experience - if your camera is sitting on the shelf for an extended period of time, take the batteries out. Eventually they can sometimes leak and ruin a great camera!

Is the battery still available? I think this was a problem about 15 years ago. I am not sure it was the battery of my fathers f3 or its older nikormat

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2020 at 18:27 UTC
In reply to:

kierenlon: I have a couple of old film cameras, both with the passed sticker on. Did no-one take that sticker off their camera??

No! I am sure it is still on my fathers camera.

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2020 at 18:25 UTC
On article Best lenses for Micro Four Thirds (362 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: So none of the manual focus ones from 3rd party manufacturers qualify?

+1

Link | Posted on Jul 5, 2019 at 16:37 UTC
In reply to:

MarcoSartoriPhoto: First thing, I like the image/photo.
Second: I'd like to say that this looks as if it was taken from Mount Paderno, and in that case the bigger city on the horizon can oonly be Cortina d'Ampezzo: not that big to cause all that "boucing lights".
I believe it's "just" a sunset.
Again, PP was well done.

The picture is taken near Patternsattel / focella Lavaredo. Mount Paderno is just 250m lower than the grande Cime. The vista from there would give a view more from above and right, exposing more of its north face.

Cortina is indeed the only small city and siuated directly behind the grande cime. In between Grande cime and Cortina there is Monte cristallo that is 2000 m higher than The Cime. I also think that the yellow is sunset.

No idea about light polution nowadays. I climbed the grande cime 15 years ago, along the ridge that we are looking at. It really got dark by the time we started our last rappel.
Steven

Link | Posted on Dec 4, 2017 at 19:11 UTC
In reply to:

jhinkey: Nice effort, but the flashes should not be visible in the shot - photoshop them out?

Seems like you need to take a second effort at this with the flashes hidden or make some custom flashes that are much smaller (like LED-based high speed flashes) - disconnect the flash heads from the body with a wire in between so that just the flash head itself needs to be hanging off the sail, or something like that. A flash slightly down in the hull pointing up at the sail or horizontally at her might have been a better option.

I know more about laser sailing than photograpy. The first thing i thought was that there was a massive block of ice on the vang?! My conclusion is that the flashes do distract if you know about laser sailing.

However, i like the pictures and know how extremely difficult it is to get good dinghy pics. For me it is hard to get better images than my sons with their gopro creativity.

Could a petzl powerled headlight (continuous light source) be of any help?

We have a 29er with crew if you need a more challenging subject. Even the go pro struggels there!

Link | Posted on Nov 13, 2017 at 20:20 UTC
Total: 7, showing: 1 – 7