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Interview: Olympus Educators Lisa and Tom Cuchara on how Olympus has transformed their outdoor photography

Lisa and Tom Cuchara are photographers and Olympus Educators, based in Connecticut. Their work covers everything from weddings and infant portraiture, to bird and macro photography.

Over the course of long careers, they've used various types and brands of camera equipment, but these days their core kit is based around Olympus OM-D series cameras and M.Zuiko lenses. In this interview, they explain their background, the various kinds of photography that keep them creatively inspired, and why they chose to make the switch to Olympus's Micro Four Thirds system for their bird and nature work.


What are your favorite photographic subjects?

Lisa: Our favorite subject matter is whatever we're photographing at the moment. So we've been focusing a lot on birds, but once the insects start to come out, we do that. We've published a book on frog photography. We published a book on abandoned photography, urban exploration. So we really do love most subjects.

Tom: Lately we've been doing a lot of bird photography, particularly in the backyard this year, during the pandemic. I'm setting up our backyard for more pleasing backgrounds. I've also been spending time in the Forsythe nature preserve in New Jersey, and we travel around the Hammonasset to photograph some of the birds, like the short-haired owl and the terns and things like that.

Green Heron.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X in Pro Capture ('Low') mode. Tom says: 'Waiting for action, the decisive moment, is one of the best times to use Pro Capture. The Green Heron stood there not moving for many minutes, then snap! It grabbed the prey'.

M.Zuiko 300mm F4.0 IS PRO + MC-14 1.4x Teleconverter (840mm equiv.)
ISO 400 | F5.6

What first drew you to bird photography?

Tom: I think just the nature of a bird, it's fast, there's a lot of them, so you're always interested. There's always something happening. It's a challenge to get the birds in flight, but it's just as challenging to get a nice composition of a bird that's just standing still or doing something interesting, like eating, mating, fighting. And the colors are just wonderful.

The nature of a bird, it's fast, there's a lot of them, so you're always interested

Lisa: Right now ruddy ducks are in their breeding season and they just crack me up. They make me smile when they're going through this mating ritual. Or the Cardinals in the backyard. It doesn't matter what size bird it is, they all seem to have their own unique personality. Trying to capture the particular behaviors unique to that bird is really fun and challenging.

House Finch.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X
M.Zuiko 100-400mm F5.0-6.3 IS (800mm equiv.)
ISO 3200 | F8

How did you both get started in the world of photography?

Lisa: I got interested in photography as a teenager. When I was 13, my mother asked me what I wanted for my birthday present. I said I wanted a camera. I think in this fast-paced world, photography gives us a chance to slow down and notice things. It gives you a chance to notice the beauty that's all around us, the beauty of every season, the beauty of every subject. At times, it's therapeutic too. Tom and I met in a camera club in 2000.

Photography gives us a chance to slow down and notice things

Tom: My father loved photography and I became enamored with it. I used to work with kids in a psychiatric hospital and I developed a dark room with them. The staff liked my pictures, so they started hiring me to photograph events and picnics and weddings and things like that. It kind of grew once I met Lisa. We started doing weddings, and then we turned to nature, because we find it a lot more engaging and fun.

Lisa: We still have a portrait studio, we'll photograph kids in it, and head shots. But mainly we're using it now for doing hands-on macro photography, light painting, and teaching Photoshop.

Black-capped Chickadee.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X
M.Zuiko 300mm F4.0 IS PRO + MC-14 1.4x Teleconverter (840mm equiv.)
ISO 2500 | F5.6

What makes a good portrait?

Lisa: I think key to taking a good portrait is just being patient. When a child comes in, we might actually not even have them look at the camera for 20 minutes. We'll put out some toys and we might have them just get used to playing. We take some photographs of them just being natural. And then we build into it.

Tom: It's making that emotional connection with people, taking your time and not feel hurried, not let them feel like they have to hurry, relaxing them, having a little bit of fun and then not being in a rush.

Your work is very varied, everything from macros of insects, to portraits, weddings and everything in between. What do you find the most challenging sort of situations as photographers?

Tom: I think bird photography. It's physically challenging to stand out in the wind and the cold, carrying all your gear, and there's a lot of waiting patiently for the bird to do something interesting. The bird's going to go where it wants to go.

Male Wood Duck, with simulated Bird AI Autofocus reticle overlaid. Bird detection in the OM-D E-M1X uses AI-based deep learning to automatically prioritize detection of a bird's eye, allowing the photographer to focus on composition.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X
M.Zuiko 300mm F4.0 IS PRO + MC-14 1.4x Teleconverter (840mm equiv.)
ISO 2000 | F5.6

What's your core equipment right now?

Tom: I've been using the 300mm F4 PRO with a 1.4X converter to photograph birds, alongside the 40-150mm F2.8 PRO. Lisa loves her 60mm macro. So we go from the macro to the longer lenses for birds, but also we can shoot flowers and things like that with a 300mm as well.

Lisa: For cameras, Tom has two OM-D E-M1X bodies and I have two E-M1 Mark III bodies and one E-M1X. My preferred camera is the E-M1 Mark III, but if I'm doing bird photography, I'll use the E-M1X.

Red-bellied Woodpecker.

Olympus OM-D E-M1X
M.Zuiko 150-400mm F4.5 TC1.25X IS PRO (1000mm equiv.)
ISO 1000 | F5.6

How has the gear that you use evolved over time?

Lisa: Both Tom and I used DSLRs for decades and we really didn't have too much interest in changing over to something else. And then we were at a workshop and we were photographing a lighthouse in the dark. The workshop participant that standing next to me had the Olympus OM-D E-M1, and he could see what we were photographing in the dark in Live Composite mode. And I'm like, "Wait, what is that? How are you doing that?" And I went home and immediately investigated. It was definitely the computational technology - Live Composite, Live Time, in-camera focus stacking, pro-capture, and so on, along with wide variety of sharp lenses, that drew us to Olympus

We found that the Olympus gear was just light and fast, and the focusing was sharp. We came home and we sold all our DSLR equipment.

We still kept all of our DSLR gear for our bird photography for a while, but on a trip to Florida we decided to try and see if we could shoot everything with our Olympus mirrorless kit. We found that the Olympus gear was just light and fast, and the focusing was sharp. We came home and we sold all our DSLR equipment. We just thought if we brought it all the way down to Florida and didn't use it, there's no point in having it anymore.

Lisa, you're known as 'The Frog Whisperer' - what's your top tip for photographing frogs?

Lisa: Patience. The frog isn't going to do what you want it to do. I got the name frog whisperer because I would put my frog, Pixel, in place and I would talk to it. And I just put my finger up to it. And the frog would sit there. So, that's kind of where I got the frog whisperer nickname.

Gray Tree Frog.

Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark III
M.Zuiko 12-40mm F2.8 PRO (80mm equiv.)
ISO 6400 | F8

At one point, I had like 350 frogs. And then Tom finally said, "No more frogs!" So I started coming home with chameleons and a praying mantis and walking sticks. Every once in a while, there'll be something down in the kitchen, and Tom will shout up to me "Lisa, you've got to come and get your critter, it's escaped!"

How has technology changed the way you shoot?

Lisa: Over and over in the past few years we've found ourselves saying again and again how much more fun photography is because the technology has changed, and we're also a lot more productive. A lot of times with our DSLRs, we had to do a lot of work in Photoshop. If you wanted to do star stacking or focus bracketing, we had to bring it all into Photoshop.

I find myself handholding pictures at an eighth of a second thinking, "Wow, these are sharp"

Whereas now, for example, we can do focus stacking in camera. I used to take focus bracketed pictures with my DSLR, but I would say I only processed like 2% of them because I'd rather be out shooting rather than sitting at the computer. Versus now, I get that focus stacked picture right out of the camera.

The Olympus OM-D E-M1X and E-M1 Mark III feature advanced 5-axis image stabilization, which is effective up to 7.5EV with supported lenses, and up to 8EV with the new 150-400mm PRO zoom (CIPA-rating) .

Even the image stabilization with the M.Zuiko lenses – I used to lug my tripod everywhere. I hated the tripod, but I love the pictures I got with it. But now I find myself handholding pictures at an eighth of a second thinking, "Wow, these are sharp." So I think that has helped. And like I said, I think Tom and I both use the word 'fun' quite a bit now with our photography,

Have you been able to use the new 150-400mm PRO lens?

Lisa: We have. We were supposed to be sharing this lens but it's superglued to my camera, so Tom doesn't get to use it much!

I'm using it a lot for bird photography. I love the fact that the varied focal length range lets me capture different behaviors without changing lenses. I've never had a lens with a built-in teleconverter. The TC switch is right there where my thumb is, so when I want to go in close for a bird that's further away or for a headshot, I can just flip it on. It's also lightweight, and fast. Compared to the 500mm lenses we used to shoot with our DSLRs, I can hand-hold this lens all day long.

The M.Zuiko 150-400mm F4.5 TC1.25X IS PRO is a powerful telephoto zoom lens, which offers excellent image stabilization and a maximum equivalent focal length of 1,000mm using the built-in teleconverter.

Are there any features that you'd really like to see improved or added in future generations of Olympus cameras?

Lisa: I'd love to have Bird Detection AI Autofocus in a camera more of the size of the E-M1 Mark III. I was just about to sell my E-M1X, actually, because I really was only using the E-M1 Mark III. And then in December last year, Olympus came out with this Bird Detection AF and I was just like, oh, good thing I didn't sell it. That's something I use for birds all the time now.

In Pro Capture mode, with the shutter button half-pressed, Olympus cameras can constantly record images to buffer memory at frame-rates up to 60fps. To capture the perfect moment, simply press the shutter button down fully. At that point, a sequence of full-resolution images taken before and shortly after the shutter actuation will be recorded to your memory card.

Tom does a lot of shooting with Pro Capture mode. I don't do as much, but it really does feel like cheating. You're sitting there waiting and this Green Heron's here and just sitting there and sitting there and sitting there. And then it finally goes for the fish. And by the time that your brain connects to your finger to trip the shutter, normally you'd miss it. With Pro Capture, you capture it every time and that's just amazing.


Click the link below to see more birding and wildlife photography tips from Lisa and Tom and other Olympus photographers:

Olympus education and inspiration

This is sponsored content, created in partnership with OM Digital Solutions. What does this mean?

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Comments

All (60)
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Oldest first
trewsbury76

OLYMPUS MIX marketed as sports action camera plus quality zoom lenses for nature photography. However M43 a step behind APS-C and full-frame main stream players due to smaller sensor. OLYMPUS M1X rates serious consideration but the overall design of dials and switches seem a bit flimsy to me. My first impression in shop.

1 month ago
Albert Valentino

Good interview. I also moved over to Olympus a few years ago and my EM1.3 does everything I need and lots more. I love that I can shoot waterfalls with stacked filters at 1-3 seconds handheld. And now, if I do not have my filters with me, I can just use the ND filter mode to get that long exposure, silky water look I love. 99% of what I shoot is at ISO 200 so little worries about noise or reduced DR. 20mp is more than I need but if I need more my camera can shoot a high resolution image of a still subject handheld. Amazing! The thing is, i doubt I will be buying another camera for many years since I finally have everything I need. I also own two pairs of Olympus binoculars. Overall, I am a very pleased user!

3 months ago
Sue Anne Rush
Sue Anne Rush

Excellent.

3 months ago
Copal Fit
Copal Fit

Olympus makes great microscopes. That's all I am saying here......

3 months ago
Aniell

So you actually own a microscope, cannot fault the optics of Olympus lenses

3 months ago*
FantasticMrFox
FantasticMrFox

Canon makes great printers. Sony makes great gaming consoles. Pentax makes great colonoscopes ... and eye pieces for telescopes.

;)

3 months ago
Grimstod

I have two Olympus Microscopes. Great tools with great optics and easy to use. We examine micro cutting tool for wear with them in the shop.

3 months ago
fnord77

"olympus educators"

regardless of the quality of the article, I hate how marketing permeates everything.

3 months ago
Dellis12

The lack of marketing contributed to the negative perceptions of Micro 4/3 and Olympus's poor sales performance, not its products, sensor size, or any other tangible aspect. On the other hand, Fuji has done a remarkable job marketing its products and cultivating users for a system that in many ways (weather resistance, IBIS, lens assortment, Hi-Res, and arguably ergonomics) is a step behind Olympus. Like virtually every other camera brand, Fuji makes excellent products, no doubt. But they've leveraged the enthusiasm of their users far better than Olympus and many other brands and have built a strong loyal base of Fuji advocates. We'll see if Olympus can do that, too.

3 months ago*
Kit Lens Avenger
Kit Lens Avenger

So when Yongnuo, Meike or another of the Chinese revolving-name companies gets into the act they will be reeducators?

3 months ago
Ross the Fidller
Ross the Fidller

I think it was a mistake (at first) naming the mirrorless cameras 'micro' as that instilled a perception the sensors were tiny & couldn't be any good for anything serious, but as the OM-D line progressed I think that started to be less of a problem. I think it would have been better to name it Mirrorless Four Thirds, because that is exactly what it is (with a smaller mount than Four Thirds).

3 months ago
Julian

Nikon are you watching??? Following birds with a Z6 (mark 1) is next to impossible for accurate focus results, my D800 achieves much better results (and yeah I read the autofocus guides from a number of authors on the Z6 and have played a lot with the settings etc). Fortunately bird photography is more of a hobby thing for me, but I would love a camera that can handle it - and it sure looks like olympus might be onto something here ( note to self - its comments like this that got me banned from Nikon rumours ;) )

3 months ago*
FantasticMrFox
FantasticMrFox

Why look at mFT, when the Canon R6 is much more closely related to your Z6, and has stellar AF? ;)

3 months ago
Mr Bolton

More expensive, less resolution, lots of really expensive glass. Unless f11 is bright enough for you at a distance.

3 months ago
ecka84
ecka84

"More expensive" - Not really. If we add lens prices.
"less resolution" - No. MFT only has 20mp.
"lots of really expensive glass" - Which you don't have to buy, to get something similar to MFT (which doesn't offer you that option). FF F11 is like MFT F5.6.

3 months ago
Sue Anne Rush
Sue Anne Rush

Thank you.

3 months ago
Acker Bilks Bowler Hat

I couldn't agree more. I switched from a D500 and Sigma 150-600 over 2 years ago to an E-M1X with 300mm/F4 as my main wildlife lens. Could not be happier with making the switch. Love everything about the setup and results I get compared to the D500. I've since bought a Pen-F and some F1.8 primes for a street/vacation setup. Both are a real pleasure to use with really useful features such as Live ND/High Res/Bird AF modes and the superb monochrome modes of the Pen-F

3 months ago*
rogerstpierre

It's easy to get our heads burried in specs and pixel peeps, but very, very, very few photographers would be dissatisfied with these shots, and even fewer amongst most those who hang around here on DPR. M43 isn't best at everything though, nor is FF. Getting a system suited to one's (true) needs is the key, and articles as such are very helpful in debunking some of the myths that are perpetuated by gearheads.

3 months ago
faunagraphy
faunagraphy

It's refreshing to visit the comments section and see positivity, rather than the usual trash-talking over sensor size by people who couldn't take a decent photo with ANY camera. The moderators are doing a good job. It's also a real pleasure to read an interview of two people who ENJOY photography and have a passion for their subjects, rather than simply talk about gear. I think that these are the kind of people that Olympus gear is really made for.

3 months ago
Acker Bilks Bowler Hat

Perfectly summed up. You actually enjoy reading the positive view of life in what has been a very challenging 18 months for all of us. Good to see DPreview now moderating comments. Well done 👍

3 months ago*
Nilangsu

Photography has nothing to do with the size of the sensor, except in specific and special circumstances. These photographers in this story and this gentleman linked below whose work I adore very much are just two examples.

https://www.philnortonphotography.co.uk/

Regards
Nilangsu

3 months ago
Glen Barrington
Glen Barrington

I really like my Oly gear, and all the 'talking points' people use to explain why they don't use m43s, has never felt significant to me. And I don't feel those 'talking points' have ever restricted my photography in any way.

3 months ago
Terrible Photographer
Terrible Photographer

I know Olympus's target market is the outdoor and wildlife photographer, but the smaller chip, short focal length lenses, plus a Hi-Res Multishot mode that works with strobes, actually make it a surprisingly phenomenal studio product, fine art repro, and architectural camera system.

No joke, so long as you're not clipping your highlights, the M1X can routinely net me an image superior to my D800E, which I only keep so I can use the Nikon 85mm PC-E in the studio.

3 months ago
FuhTeng
FuhTeng

I appreciated this post. I have two photographer friends who adore their Olympus systems. I have never seen a photo from them that would have been better with a larger sensor. Indeed, I can only rarely notice an apparent sensor size for any given image.

3 months ago*
Mountainwalker444

Unfortunately a lot of pixel-peepers don't seem to be able to admit you can achieve damn fine photographs with Olympus equipment. The biggest mistake I have ever made in photography is switching to "full frame" thinking it would make me a better photographer.

3 months ago
Ed Jefferies

I didn't think we could comment on sponsored content.

I only have positive things to say about this article. Excellent photographers creating excellent photos with excellent cameras.

3 months ago
Dellis12

It seems that Olympus's new owners are finally realizing that marketing might help support a great brand with some of the most innovative products in the industry. AI and developments like Adobe's Super Resolution make the megapixel war irrelevant for most photographers. No reason to carry 40 lbs of glass to get the resolution bump. I've shot with Olympus for years and have also shot with almost every contemporary brand and format. I've not found Olympus IQ lacking with the occasional exception of extremely low light situations. For those who think the brand and the Micro 4/3 format is dead, sponsored articles like this are very encouraging.

3 months ago
faunagraphy
faunagraphy

Those who thought (to use the verb loosely) that "Micro Four Thirds is dead" were never open to changing their minds. The rest of us shoot with the gear that brings is joy, which in my case mostly happens to be Micro Four Thirds. However it is sad that some of these shills have influence because they weaponize FUD (fear, uncertainty, doubt) and so novices believe that they cannot get exceptional photos without a $4000+ camera body.

3 months ago
vadims

Glad you kept comment section open.

A good write-up is a good write-up, sponsored or not.

Good luck to Olympus, and all the nice people using their gear.

3 months ago
Welsh

I’m an extremely nice person, yet I prefer a larger sensor.

3 months ago
Ross the Fidller
Ross the Fidller

@Welsh
I prefer a camera system myself (mine being Olympus). I can do more with it than 'a larger sensor'. ;)

3 months ago
Grimstod

I hope Olympus aggressively pursues computational photography. Maybe even add in a built in stacking solution for astrophotography.

3 months ago
Glen Barrington
Glen Barrington

Frankly, I think this is the future of photography in general. I suspect we will eventually see a lack of emphasis on sensor size in marketing material. Except for specialized needs, the sensors won't matter all that much.

3 months ago
Barry Stewart
Barry Stewart

Before machine learning came onto the photography stage, I mused that I'd like to be able to tell my Olympus camera, "If you ever see chain link fence or any kind of mesh in the frame: DO NOT focus on it — EVER! If I actually want to shoot a fence, force me to go to MF."

So many sports fields have chain link fencing, and they have a magnetic effect on the AF, even when the AF sensors are clearly aimed at a target far away from the mesh.

My comment gained no traction at the time — but I still stand by it. Make a camera with built-in "Chain Link Blockers" and I'll buy it.

3 months ago
Lozrus

@Barry Stewart Recently (since the E-M1mkII I think) Olympus have had the option to limit the AF distance range.

It's not something I would often benefit from so I've never seriously tested it, and certainly not in the chain link fence scenario, but in theory it should be usable for exactly that purpose. Just set the camera up to only allow focus from just behind the fence onwards.

3 months ago
Fotoni

Small subjects like little birds or frogs are great for small format cameras because then the actual photo can also have small dimensions for natural look and that means tons of oversampling is available.

3 months ago
faunagraphy
faunagraphy

Also, greater DOF at wider apertures is a significant advantage in macro photography. This is easier to achieve with a smaller sensor. The built-in focus bracketing in Olympus bodies is a nice bonus.

3 months ago
a_reader

I always love the colours of Olympus gear, also here. Pro Capture is great and I think the competition hasn't such a feature.
But the higher ISO images shown here are too noisy for my taste and therefore demonstrate the limits of the small sensors.

3 months ago
photofan1986
photofan1986

Working with a software like Dxo photolab 4 can really solve most of these problems.

3 months ago
stevevelvia50

I’ve been using Olympus for close to four years now, and I haven’t seen images this clean at 6400 iso; I am more a landscape, abstract photographer so most of my images are made at 200 iso. I stand to be corrected, but my guess is that Topaz Denoise or a similar program was applied to the very high iso images, softening or eliminating the noise while retaining the original sharpness. I would like to know actually, because the images are very well executed. Hand held high res, while balancing in a tripod, could also be applied to the subjects at a moment of stillness, which would eliminate noise.

3 months ago*
String
String

I would suggest looking at some of the other Olympus Visionary examples... Robin Wong, Petr Bambousek for starters. They both have amazing images, use different editing software and both have rundowns on how they process images.

3 months ago
Matt Waller

Another vote for both those recommendations. I bought Petr Bambousek's video course which was excellent, covering a lot of setup detail on Olympus cameras as well as great wildlife photography tips.

3 months ago
Oceanvista

Yes there are many great photographers using m4/3, I've read and watched many of their videos among others. Dan Burkholder is a favorite of mine. I've also tried out Denoise, Gigapixel and AI sharpen. I do know that Petr Bambosek uses Topaz for some images. His wildlife is excellent.

3 months ago
HowaboutRAW

steve:

I shot some sample ISO 6400 deep shadowed raws with the EM1 III (and a very good lens), and at ISO 6400 the raws were surprisingly low noise, even though I extracted them with just the freeware ART 1.9, an updated variation of RawTherapee.

I'm sure raw extraction software with better NR than ART-RawTherapee-Darktable would provide better results, so DXO or even ACR 13. Then as others have mentioned there's processing the tiffs with Topaz Denoise AI.

Running the ISO 16,000 tiff through Denoise AI as I write, and it looked plenty good just extracted with ART 1.9.

3 months ago
generationfourth

I noticed that the Olympus jpg processing does a fine job with noise. Even at max 25,600 ISO I was amazed at how usable the jpegs were. If the shot is properly exposed and you are getting as much light as possible I haven't had to use denoise, pure raw, etc. A lot of m43 users like to improperly expose at 'higher' (2000-6400) iso's then use denoise as a compelling before/after.

3 months ago
Photodog2

I do think that has one to be a better photographer both in shot taking and PP with M43 to get the most out of it. It is less forgiving of exposure mistakes than other formats, though its stabilization systems make it more forgiving in terms of hand-holding shake. M43 is more like a precision instrument instead of a blunt tool.

3 months ago
jhorse

This statement by Lisa resonates with me:
"I think in this fast-paced world, photography gives us a chance to slow down and notice things. It gives you a chance to notice the beauty that's all around us, the beauty of every season, the beauty of every subject. At times, it's therapeutic too."
Sums it up nicely.

3 months ago
Mr Bolton

I thought that too. It's a great comment.

3 months ago
jimkahnw
jimkahnw

The grey tree frog is a remarkable capture. The caption claims 6400 ISO and there is zero noise, at least as large as it gets in the on screen reproduction. I've never been able to get as clean a file as this ISO with my Oly equipment at 6400. How was the file processed? Thanks.

3 months ago
pannumon

One thing is that in general green subjects show less noise than subjects with more red and blue on them. I think this is because in the Bayer color filter, 50% of the pixels are green. That said, our eyes are also more sensitive to green, so in principle we should also see green noise more easily.

3 months ago
Jer81

You should try DxO PureRAW (free trial). It's great.

3 months ago
A Owens

It certainly looks to be a superb high ISO capture. Great job.

3 months ago
Astrotripper

Yeah, modern noise reduction is pretty darn good. But the most important part is having a well exposed photo. Underexposed shots are much harder to recover. So if you can ETTR your shot, do it.

As for noise itself, the most important part is removing chroma noise, as that is what we are most sensitive to.

And also not to sharpen the noise, which is what you will get when you boost microcontrast or apply sharpening with wrong settings. I don't use LR, but tried Bridge and by default it applied excessive sharpening that made small traces of noise appear as if the photos were shot at ISO settings at least 3 stops higher. If this is what ACR defaults in LR are, no wonder people think MFT images are noisy.

Also, large parts of the image being fairly uniform in terms of color and texture makes it easy to get rid of the noise as well.

3 months ago
cheesesteak
cheesesteak

I am surprised by the background blur for a 80mm f16 equivalent shot. Even the frog's legs start to be out of focus. I do wonder if the settings are correctly stated, including ISO.

I do very much like the image either way.

3 months ago*
Astrotripper

The frog is quite small and it's a close up. So no problems getting blurry background if it is at a decent distance.

Also, might have used an artificial background, who knows.

3 months ago
Oceanvista

You've just made an important point, shallow DOF is not really an issue at all when you know your equipment, the old argument of shallow dof for FF over M4/3 is a moot point.

3 months ago*
Lisa Cuchara

To reduce noise: (1) expose to the right, underexposed images are MUCH noisier, not talking blinkies, just ETTR, (2) view the RAW file in Olympus workspace at 100% or 200% to assess noise, Adobe often makes the images noisy (and you can tell this by comparing the view from Olympus Workspace versus Adobe, We have turned off the default sharpening in ACR and LR because it makes image too noisy), and if necessary use noise reduction in post-processing. If #1 and @2 are done well, you should not need to use #3, but life does happen sometimes.

3 months ago
Mariano Pacifico

Olympus is back in the game with bird-eye-view ... these are outdoor-centric cameras with excellent bird-eye-AF implementation.

Welcome back Olympus !

3 months ago
Toni Genes
Toni Genes

Olympus was all the time in the game.
In fact Olympus was the first who implemented "inteligent subject detection".

And even now while all the others have only bird&animal detection, Olympus is still the only one who offers various subjects detection like cars, trains, planes...etc

3 months ago*
Glen Barrington
Glen Barrington

I don't think they were ever out of the game, TBH. But I'm glad you think they are in the game now!

3 months ago