AlanG

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Film to digital
I am now using a Bowens Illumitran with a 60mm Componon lens and a 42MPix Sony A7RII to copy my negs and transparencies. I shoot tethered to Capture One and apply an inverted film curve for b/w. This is much faster and better than using my 120T Polaroid Film Scanner. I can shoot quickly and then adjust and process the RAW images later using C1 or DXO.
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Available sizes: Small, Medium, Large
Captured: Jul 14, 2018
Uploaded: Jul 14, 2018 (UTC)
Focal length: 25 mm
Shutter speed: 1/60 sec
Aperture: F4
ISO: 100
Exposure comp.: -

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fabulousrice
fabulousrice

What are the blue icons on the right screen? May we see a full res scan this produced?

Aug 2, 2018
fabulousrice
fabulousrice

Interesting. These don't particularly strike me as good scans compared to what I have seen the Pakon or some Epson flatbed scanners do? What is the actual scanning resolution versus extrapolated?

Aug 2, 2018
AlanG
AlanG

You are sure missing something. I only have one film example there. It is the girl's face and you can see how it is cropped from the full image. Every aspect of the grain and scratches are sharp. I don't see the possibility of getting more detail from that photo since one can easily see the grain is the limiting factor.

Previously I was using the pictured Polaroid dedicated film scanner (not a flatbed) that scans at 4000 dpi. That produces a scan from 35mm of a bit less than 6000 x 4000 pixels. It is much slower to scan that way than shoot with a camera. The Sony camera I use records the image at 7952 x 5304. I guess I could always shoot two or more frames and combine them for even more resolution, but the original film does not have that level of detail in it as is clearly shown by my scans.

Why don't you post an example of a shot made on Tri-X at 400 ISO that is scanned differently showing greater detail?

Aug 2, 2018*
fabulousrice
fabulousrice

"Every aspect of the grain and scratches are sharp" that's where I slightly disagree, the grain looks extrapolated, but maybe the photo wasn't very sharp to begin with?
There are many Pakon groups on flickr and facebook, you can see how sharp some photos are and you can probably find Tri X 400 scanned in these groups too.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10214902543109373&set=p.10214902543109373&type=3&theater&ifg=1

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1639478589482966&set=g.657750677577306&type=1&theater&ifg=1

Aug 3, 2018
AlanG
AlanG

FWIW I can shoot much more magnified if necessary. I also have photographed film through microscopes and there is no more detail in these Tri-X photos than that. Do you not see how grainy Tri-X film is? That grain will be there no matter what scanner is used. The typical film shooter does not make digital copies that are better than mine.

Did you not look at my APS 6400 ISO comparison? Film does not come remotely close to that.

Do you not believe your own eyes?

BTW, your links didn't work for me.

Aug 3, 2018*
fabulousrice
fabulousrice

Do you have examples of the microscope shots of negatives? I'd be curious to see them! Sorry if the links didnt work you might have to be a member of the Pakon 135 group.

Aug 14, 2018