Ferrari & F-1 Pics

Started Feb 24, 2004 | Discussions
Ryan Schlagheck Regular Member • Posts: 200
Looks like Lime Rock Park in Connecticut?

Kyle Burt wrote:

bdnc wrote:
so an oversized driver can fit in. Must be hard to keep it on the
road when shoehorned in like that! (his inside wheels are on the
grass).

Kyle Burt wrote:

Well I thought I would continue the old thread since it filled up.
With the new F-1 season only 10 days away I though I'd add F-1 to
the mix. Here is an old Ferrari F-1 car to kick things off.

-- hide signature --

R. Schlagheck

David A Bigwood Regular Member • Posts: 115
Re: Ferrari & F-1 Pics

No Ferraris, but some pics from Montreal and Indy from last year...

D60 + 70-200 IS 2.8L

'What'd you do today?'

'Nothing. I did absolutely nothing. And it was everything I ever hoped it would be.' -Office Space

OP Kyle Burt Contributing Member • Posts: 736
Re: Ferrari & F-1 Pics

It was taken at the top of the corkscrew, near the base of the communications stand (we weren't allowed in the tower that weekend) - I may have been standing on the concrete base, but I can't remember.

Ryan Schlagheck wrote:

Kyle,

Is that pic taken from the treehouse at the top of the corkscrew?

Another good location for cars is turn 5 - hard left-hander, off
camber.

R. Schlagheck
superbikepics.com

mobean Regular Member • Posts: 178
Re: A few more of The Man....

Form Indianapolis last year:

Andrew

andrea buso Veteran Member • Posts: 3,319
He will be the one to beat. AGAIN!!!!

Today at Autodromo Dino Ferrari in Imola Italy, during a testing session where all the best teams were present, Michael Shumacher slashed the track record by 0.7 sec. The second fastest was Davild Coulthard on Mc Laren at 1.3 sec, Montoya 3d at 1.5 sec on Williams.

Track times at this time of the year are not really indicative but It looks GOOD.

Andrea.

PS. for who is not familiar with F1 timings, 1.3 second gap is "a life time".

mobean wrote:

Form Indianapolis last year:

Andrew

bdnc Senior Member • Posts: 1,738
Yes - Limerock Park - Vintage Fall Festival 2002 NT

Ryan Schlagheck wrote:

Kyle Burt wrote:

bdnc wrote:
so an oversized driver can fit in. Must be hard to keep it on the
road when shoehorned in like that! (his inside wheels are on the
grass).

Kyle Burt wrote:

Well I thought I would continue the old thread since it filled up.
With the new F-1 season only 10 days away I though I'd add F-1 to
the mix. Here is an old Ferrari F-1 car to kick things off.

OP Kyle Burt Contributing Member • Posts: 736
Another image - somewhat abstract

John Davis Veteran Member • Posts: 3,504
Re: Not your typical low profile tire...

Notice the height of the sidewalls on those tires! Compare that to today's 30-40% low profile tires of the street legals sports cars we drive.

I guess that rubber is needed to cushion the road given that the suspension itself is very hard. Also... lower profiles would imply larger wheels raising the unsprung weight.

John

nick_eos wrote:

The one the only David Coul... err Mr Shoemaker himself

2003 Silverstone, 10D with a 70-300IS

Hopefullt this year will be back with the 1Ds 100-400IS and 1.4 MKII

http://www.pbase.com/nick_eos/silverstone_2003

Jbrose Regular Member • Posts: 274
RE: Some more F1 Pics

Nice Shots Everyone,

Here is a link to a montage I did from some of my shots from last years United States GP. Hopefully I am doing this correctly, It's my first time linking a picture, Sorry if it fails.

Feel free to check out the other shots in my F1 gallery although not all are Farrari.

http://www1.photosig.com/go/photos/view?id=1133977

OP Kyle Burt Contributing Member • Posts: 736
F-1 regulations

One of the reasons there is so littel difference in F-1 cars these days is because of regulations - this includes the tyres. the maximum diameter is specified & so is the tyre bead diameter. This yields a regulated sidewall height. Since there is so much sidewall F-1 cars use this as thier primary means of suspension, which one of the reasons why a tyre can be designed for a specific car (or a car for a tyre) - the flex of a sidewall has a lot to do with the spring rate of a car..

Here is a llink to the f-1 sporting regs if anyone is interested (section 12 in the text deals with wheels & tyres)

http://www.fia.com/homepage/selection-a.html

John Davis wrote:
Notice the height of the sidewalls on those tires! Compare that to
today's 30-40% low profile tires of the street legals sports cars
we drive.

I guess that rubber is needed to cushion the road given that the
suspension itself is very hard. Also... lower profiles would imply
larger wheels raising the unsprung weight.

John

nick_eos wrote:

The one the only David Coul... err Mr Shoemaker himself

2003 Silverstone, 10D with a 70-300IS

Hopefullt this year will be back with the 1Ds 100-400IS and 1.4 MKII

http://www.pbase.com/nick_eos/silverstone_2003

John Davis Veteran Member • Posts: 3,504
Re: F-1 regulations

Kyle Burt wrote:

One of the reasons there is so littel difference in F-1 cars these
days is because of regulations - this includes the tyres. the
maximum diameter is specified & so is the tyre bead diameter. This
yields a regulated sidewall height. Since there is so much
sidewall F-1 cars use this as thier primary means of suspension,
which one of the reasons why a tyre can be designed for a specific
car (or a car for a tyre) - the flex of a sidewall has a lot to do
with the spring rate of a car..

Interesting... that's what I thought, but in a sense, for the ultimate prototype technology platform that is odd. Because a rubber tire suspension offers very little control. The theory behind low profile tires is to decouple the (uncontrolled) tire springness from the actual (controlled) suspension components - spring/shock. Of course (on daily drivers), on less than autobhan-class surfaces we pay a comfort price.

John

Here is a llink to the f-1 sporting regs if anyone is interested
(section 12 in the text deals with wheels & tyres)

http://www.fia.com/homepage/selection-a.html

John Davis wrote:
Notice the height of the sidewalls on those tires! Compare that to
today's 30-40% low profile tires of the street legals sports cars
we drive.

I guess that rubber is needed to cushion the road given that the
suspension itself is very hard. Also... lower profiles would imply
larger wheels raising the unsprung weight.

John

nick_eos wrote:

The one the only David Coul... err Mr Shoemaker himself

2003 Silverstone, 10D with a 70-300IS

Hopefullt this year will be back with the 1Ds 100-400IS and 1.4 MKII

http://www.pbase.com/nick_eos/silverstone_2003

OP Kyle Burt Contributing Member • Posts: 736
Re: F-1 regulations + a great pic

I think this is here much of the current f-1 tyre war is in designing the tyres so they have predictable handeling characteristics. The developments here will certainly work thier way down to passenger car tyres, I'm not sure how much suspension technology is transferrable. One of the advantages with tight rules is you can force manufactures to concentrate development efforts on things that will benefit passenger cars the most - tyres, fuel efficiency, traction control, semi automatic geraboxes.

Another reason for the high sidewall tyres in F-1 and other fast open wheel racing series is to prevent wheel damage from occurring when you hit a kerb hard. Try doing this with a low prfoilie tyre - I don't think your race would last very long.

Interesting... that's what I thought, but in a sense, for the
ultimate prototype technology platform that is odd. Because a
rubber tire suspension offers very little control. The theory
behind low profile tires is to decouple the (uncontrolled) tire
springness from the actual (controlled) suspension components -
spring/shock. Of course (on daily drivers), on less than
autobhan-class surfaces we pay a comfort price.

John

KennyG Senior Member • Posts: 1,217
A bit of maturity

Maybe its my age, but I do like them older.

Oulton Park Gold Cup (UK 2003)

-- hide signature --

Kenny

If you really want to know what I shoot with - look under my profile.

Kev - UK South Coast Contributing Member • Posts: 527
Goodwood Photos . . .

I shot some in 2003 at the Revival and 2002 at the Festival. The later ones are 10d, and the earlier ones Provia 100F. You can tell the film shots from the black rebate around those pictures. http://www.contemporary-wedding-photography.com/goodwood.htm

Any cropping is only on one side. The 60's F1 Lotus is my favorite with the period helmit - much nicer than the full face ones often seen on the grid.

Regards,
Kev

Stuart Rider wrote:
I have loads of Goodwood pics
here http://www.pbase.com/srider/motorsport

One to be getting on with....

BanLecter wrote:
we nearly went there last year, but circumstances were not ideal..

Kyle Burt wrote:
I won't be going to any FIA F-1 races, but will be covering several
historic F-1 races 3 or 4 depending if I go to the Monaco Historic
GP). I will also be going to the goodwood festival of speed, which
usually has some F-1 cars and drivers. I think in many ways I like
the historic cars better, there is a lot of variety of cars and you
can get very close to them. I will post pictures as often as I can

  • first one wil either be a club event at Laguna in March or the

Long Beach GP in April (I'm hoping to have my MkII by then). Until
then I'll keep posting shots from the past few seasons.

Here's one to tide you over - Tyrrell 001 & 002 together

Bill Hollinger wrote:

Kyle,

Are you going to cover them this year? If so, I hope you'll post
some shots for us - F1 is my favorite racing!

daytontp Veteran Member • Posts: 3,738
A bunch from the 2003 USGP....

My gallery:
http://www.pbase.com/daytontp/usgp_f1_2003

Nikon D100 & Nikkor 70-300ED

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Dayton in SC USA - PBase Supporter
http://www.pbase.com/daytontp/ -- More Than 142,275 Views

daytontp Veteran Member • Posts: 3,738
The dynamic duo in red....

daytontp wrote:

My gallery:
http://www.pbase.com/daytontp/usgp_f1_2003

Nikon D100 & Nikkor 70-300ED

-- hide signature --

Dayton in SC USA - PBase Supporter
http://www.pbase.com/daytontp/ -- More Than 142,275 Views

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