Stupid question about AF Fine Tune

Started 4 months ago | Questions
Supisiche Senior Member • Posts: 1,942
Stupid question about AF Fine Tune

Hi Is a global value of 0 the same as AFToff?

ANSWER:
SoCalAngler Contributing Member • Posts: 992
Re: Stupid question about AF Fine Tune
1

Supisiche wrote:

Hi Is a global value of 0 the same as AFToff?

Good question.

I don't know the answer.

But I'm always suspicious of possible unintended effects of having things on/enabled that I don't need so I always leave AFT off unless I have attached a lens that I have tuned with the camera body.

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OP Supisiche Senior Member • Posts: 1,942
Re: Stupid question about AF Fine Tune

SoCalAngler wrote:

Supisiche wrote:

Hi Is a global value of 0 the same as AFToff?

Good question.

I don't know the answer.

But I'm always suspicious of possible unintended effects of having things on/enabled that I don't need so I always leave AFT off unless I have attached a lens that I have tuned with the camera body.

Ok, thanks つ ◕_◕༽つ

Mako2011
MOD Mako2011 Forum Pro • Posts: 28,588
No...
1

Supisiche wrote:

Hi Is a global value of 0 the same as AFToff?

No. You can actually find a lens combo that will be off a bit with a zero value vs just having AFT off

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My opinions are my own and not those of DPR or its administration. They carry no 'special' value (except to me and Lacie of course)

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OP Supisiche Senior Member • Posts: 1,942
Re: No...
1

Mako2011 wrote:

Supisiche wrote:

Hi Is a global value of 0 the same as AFToff?

No. You can actually find a lens combo that will be off a bit with a zero value vs just having AFT off

Ty. Please take this imaginary money [̲̅$̲̅(̲̅ιοο̲̅)̲̅$̲̅]

Razor512
Razor512 Contributing Member • Posts: 564
Re: Stupid question about AF Fine Tune
1

A value of 0 means no offset from what is considered to be the design spec.

The fine tune values are essentially offsets of the factory spec values. One issue is some cameras may only offer 1 value per lens, which can lead to issues for lenses with loose tolerances where they may have inconsistent inaccuracy. For example some lenses may back focus within 5ft and then gradually begin to front focus, and in those cases, a single offset will only correct the focus for that given subject distance while not fixing other subject distances.

Some cameras will allow multiple offsets.

While having a lens that is properly made and calibrated from the factory is ideal, the next best thing, is a lens that works with a lens dock or has a USB port where you can do more I - depth calibration at multiple focal distances, where it will then generate variable calibration curves to account for subject distances in between each calibration point.

Lenses with their own calibration options are especially important for D5xxx and D3xxx cameras where Nikon artificially restricts the AF fune tune functions, where to fix focus issues at the camera body level, you have to risk getting malware while trying to get leaked versions of their service center software (allows for AF fine tune on both a global and individual focus point level at multiple focal distances, as well as calibrating lenses).

Sadly for Nikon, the cameras that are most likely to need calibration (budget lines have looser manufacturer tolerances), are the ones where they artificially restrict AF fine tune.

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Nikon D5600
OP Supisiche Senior Member • Posts: 1,942
Re: Stupid question about AF Fine Tune
1

Razor512 wrote:

A value of 0 means no offset from what is considered to be the design spec.

The fine tune values are essentially offsets of the factory spec values. One issue is some cameras may only offer 1 value per lens, which can lead to issues for lenses with loose tolerances where they may have inconsistent inaccuracy. For example some lenses may back focus within 5ft and then gradually begin to front focus, and in those cases, a single offset will only correct the focus for that given subject distance while not fixing other subject distances.

Some cameras will allow multiple offsets.

While having a lens that is properly made and calibrated from the factory is ideal, the next best thing, is a lens that works with a lens dock or has a USB port where you can do more I - depth calibration at multiple focal distances, where it will then generate variable calibration curves to account for subject distances in between each calibration point.

Lenses with their own calibration options are especially important for D5xxx and D3xxx cameras where Nikon artificially restricts the AF fune tune functions, where to fix focus issues at the camera body level, you have to risk getting malware while trying to get leaked versions of their service center software (allows for AF fine tune on both a global and individual focus point level at multiple focal distances, as well as calibrating lenses).

Sadly for Nikon, the cameras that are most likely to need calibration (budget lines have looser manufacturer tolerances), are the ones where they artificially restrict AF fine tune.

Oh It should be an option in every DSLR. Damn you Nikon!

Razor512
Razor512 Contributing Member • Posts: 564
Re: Stupid question about AF Fine Tune

It is one area where Nikon was especially malicious, they treat AF fine tune as some kind of premium feature when in reality is it literally a function to compensate for poor workmanship and quality control.
It should be in all of their cameras, if they can't get their $6000+ cameras to be perfect out of the box, then they can't realistically expect their $500 cameras to be perfect out of the box, it shouldn't be a a price premium feature to allow the customer to fix Nikon's shortcomings.
It is literally something they have to go out of their way to restrict since the function is in all of their cameras, including the lowest end DSLRs, they just go out of their way to hide the function from the user, and instead require them to mail the camera into a service center and pay $150+ for calibration (which they will often not do if they find it within tolerances, (if not completely bad, they will not go the extra mile to get it as perfect as possible). Sadly it is also hard to get clean copies of newer service software if you want to finetune things yourself.

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Nikon D5600
OP Supisiche Senior Member • Posts: 1,942
Re: Stupid question about AF Fine Tune

Razor512 wrote:

It is one area where Nikon was especially malicious, they treat AF fine tune as some kind of premium feature when in reality is it literally a function to compensate for poor workmanship and quality control.
It should be in all of their cameras, if they can't get their $6000+ cameras to be perfect out of the box, then they can't realistically expect their $500 cameras to be perfect out of the box, it shouldn't be a a price premium feature to allow the customer to fix Nikon's shortcomings.
It is literally something they have to go out of their way to restrict since the function is in all of their cameras, including the lowest end DSLRs, they just go out of their way to hide the function from the user, and instead require them to mail the camera into a service center and pay $150+ for calibration (which they will often not do if they find it within tolerances, (if not completely bad, they will not go the extra mile to get it as perfect as possible). Sadly it is also hard to get clean copies of newer service software if you want to finetune things yourself.

I see. I downloaded the software out of curiosity. If something goes wrong you can ruin the camera I guess. Very risky.

arrow501 Senior Member • Posts: 1,017
Re: Stupid question about AF Fine Tune

Using kit zooms and the 35mm f1.8 and 50mm f1.8 primes to shoot everyday family, nature and travel type photos is a lack of AF Fine Tune likely to be a problem?

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fpapp
fpapp Senior Member • Posts: 1,679
Re: Stupid question about AF Fine Tune

Supisiche wrote:

I see. I downloaded the software out of curiosity. If something goes wrong you can ruin the camera I guess. Very risky.

What is the name of the software?

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OP Supisiche Senior Member • Posts: 1,942
Re: Stupid question about AF Fine Tune

fpapp wrote:

Supisiche wrote:

I see. I downloaded the software out of curiosity. If something goes wrong you can ruin the camera I guess. Very risky.

What is the name of the software?

https://nikonhacker.com/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=694&sid=14011d22ecf32026ba1a1701ab925493

fpapp
fpapp Senior Member • Posts: 1,679
Re: Stupid question about AF Fine Tune
1

Supisiche wrote:

fpapp wrote:

Supisiche wrote:

I see. I downloaded the software out of curiosity. If something goes wrong you can ruin the camera I guess. Very risky.

What is the name of the software?

https://nikonhacker.com/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=694&sid=14011d22ecf32026ba1a1701ab925493

Thanks

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Nikon Coolpix P340 Nikon Coolpix A1000 Nikon D300 Nikon D610 Nikon D500 +75 more
Razor512
Razor512 Contributing Member • Posts: 564
Re: Stupid question about AF Fine Tune

arrow501 wrote:

Using kit zooms and the 35mm f1.8 and 50mm f1.8 primes to shoot everyday family, nature and travel type photos is a lack of AF Fine Tune likely to be a problem?

It depends on how out of spec the camera or lens is, sometimes you can get a lens where the focus is doesn't need any adjustment, and other times you can end up with a bad sample that will consistently front or back focus.

A few years ago, while trying to get a AF-S 35mm f/1.8 g DX, (used lenses), after 3 bad ones, I gave up and ended up getting a Tamron SP 45mm f/1.8 VC

I made a thread about it back then. https://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/4332406

Basically it was consistently back focusing.

Another sample ended up front focusing, and a 3rd was a bit better but back focused enough that the blur was noticeable and the important details were plagued by the LoCA of the lens.

If using contrast detect, then the focus was accurate.

My AF-P lenses were also accurate. I then decided to no longer get lenses where I could not calibrate the focus on, and thus ended up getting the Tamron SP 45mm f/1.8, VC. Luckily out of the box even though it was a used lens, the focus was accurate, and when checking with the lens dock, there were no AF adjustments made. I also used that time to update the lens firmware, which slightly improved the OIS behavior even though it wasn't listed in the change log.

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