High iso in photo vs video

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Vi Vy Junior Member • Posts: 28
High iso in photo vs video

If a given sensor shooting a given ISO produces a given perceived quality of photograph (measured in terms of noise and dynamic range). 6000x4000 24 MP.

Will shooting 4K video at the same ISO yield a better perceived quality video (measured in terms of noise & dynamic range) ? 3840x2160 (8.3 MP according to exiftool)

Since the video resolution is half of a photo resolution does the image processor (pixel binning or something similar ? ) produce a less noisy video ?

I shoot with A6400 but the question is more generally about how sensors perform in terms of ISO in photo vs video.

Entropy512 Veteran Member • Posts: 5,777
PDR vs EDR
1

Vi Vy wrote:

If a given sensor shooting a given ISO produces a given perceived quality of photograph (measured in terms of noise and dynamic range). 6000x4000 24 MP.

Will shooting 4K video at the same ISO yield a better perceived quality video (measured in terms of noise & dynamic range) ? 3840x2160 (8.3 MP according to exiftool)

Since the video resolution is half of a photo resolution does the image processor (pixel binning or something similar ? ) produce a less noisy video ?

I shoot with A6400 but the question is more generally about how sensors perform in terms of ISO in photo vs video.

There are varying definitions of DR - one often used because it can compare cameras of different resolutions is PDR - which is normalized to a given viewing condition.

If it were SOLELY about rescaling, then a 16:9 crop from a raw shot would deliver the same PDR as a rescaled version, by the definition of PDR.  EDR (DR per pixel) would improve.

However in an A6400, video output is 8 bits per pixel and heavily chroma subsampled, so video will kill your DR due to quantization errors.

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Andrew S10 Senior Member • Posts: 1,644
Re: High iso in photo vs video

It depends on a lot of different factors that will vary with each camera and record mode.

If a camera applies a crop in video mode, it will effectively enlarge the noise, however, heavily compressed codecs can minimize the apparent noise, and RAW will exhibit more noise, but it can also more effectively be removed than from a lossy codec.

DMKAlex
DMKAlex Veteran Member • Posts: 6,066
Re: High iso in photo vs video

Vi Vy wrote:

If a given sensor shooting a given ISO produces a given perceived quality of photograph (measured in terms of noise and dynamic range). 6000x4000 24 MP.

Will shooting 4K video at the same ISO yield a better perceived quality video (measured in terms of noise & dynamic range) ? 3840x2160 (8.3 MP according to exiftool)

Since the video resolution is half of a photo resolution does the image processor (pixel binning or something similar ? ) produce a less noisy video ?

I shoot with A6400 but the question is more generally about how sensors perform in terms of ISO in photo vs video.

A still photograph is still, static. It is there for viewer to see the pros and cons of the quality.

A video is a movie, that is, it is moving. It is fill with actions. Any scene, with exception that you are shooting a speech, or interview, is on the screen for seconds. It is not as easy to notice the imperfection as in still photography.

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Off The Mark Veteran Member • Posts: 6,062
Re: High iso in photo vs video
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Vi Vy wrote:

Since the video resolution is half of a photo resolution does the image processor (pixel binning or something similar ? ) produce a less noisy video ?

As others have mentioned, there are a few different factors. It is going to depend on the camera, the codec, and the nose reduction tech used in the cameras.

But one concrete example which goes against your question is the Panasonic S1, which is capable of shooting in 6K or 4K.

The higher resolution 6K footage has less chroma noise than the 4K footage, when the 6K footage is then down-scaled in post to 4K. (When you shoot 4K in an S1, it is down-scaled in camera form a 6K sensor readout.)

There is also less noise if you compare the 6K footage to the 4K footage if they are both down-scaled to 1080p. (This is using DaVinci Resolve... don't know about other NLE's).

This is despite the fact that the 6K footage has lower chroma sub-sampling than 4K (10-bit 4:2:0 in 6K vs 10-bit 4:2:2 in 4K)

But then you get in to things like thermal management, since shooting at higher resolutions causes the sensor to heat up more than when shooting at lower resolutions, and heat generally leads to more noise.

That is one reason the S1 has a 15-minute time limit in 6K resolution so as to avoid noise generated from heat.

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