EOS R6 Vs iPhone 13 Pro for Photography (PICS)

Started 7 months ago | Discussions
Dlee13
Dlee13 Contributing Member • Posts: 643
Re: EOS R6 Vs iPhone 13 Pro for Photography (PICS)

Larawanista wrote:

Dlee13 wrote:

CWaterston wrote:

AlgarvePhotography wrote:

99.9% of people who take photos regularly couldn’t care less about the pixel-peeping debate and simply want a decent-looking image for sharing via social media. Smartphones do this adequately.

Would I recommend an iPhone 13 Pro over and R6? Absolutely! I have friends for whom the abilities of the R6 are lost. They enjoy taking pictures. They love the composition aspect and want convenience over carrying and learning a dedicated system. They want to share on smaller screens and make small prints. For those photographers, smartphones are viable as being an option for their best tool. For those who want extra creativity, more control, larger image sizes, better solutions for harder to capture subjects etc and maximum quality then dedicated systems are best for them.
Bottom line: the iPhone 13 Pro can be a valid choice over an R6 for many people.

Indeed. In fact, I'm quite sure that owners/admins of photography forums have seen their activity and membership drop precipitously over the past 10-15 years as hobbyists went from DSLRs to "good enough" cell phone cameras. I say "in fact" because I used to be an admin at a photography forum, so I saw this drop first-hand.

Even "serious" photographers, like me, eventually question the wisdom of lugging big systems around on vacation or other events where the cons of a big system get outweighed by the pros of a decent camera that you carry with you all the time. Remember the old saw "the best camera is the one you have with you"? There you go.

In any case, this topic does not lead to an either/or solution for serious photographers. Rather, it's both. Perhaps the biggest hurdle to get over for the person who has a lot of money and time invested in the big gear is the psychological pull of "hey, I invested all this money in equipment; I ought to be using it."

The drop in forum activity wouldn’t be from smartphones, it’s more just people prefer social media sites like Instagram and Twitter for posting images than using a forum. Most people on even sites like IG use ILC’s and not their phones.

Funny enough you often see people start out with a smartphone then eventually move to a ILC. Also comes down to shooting style, those who like SOOC JPEGs would obviously be more than happy with a Smartphone as they are pretty much at the same level as the old point and shoots but for those who want that higher technical quality will always lean to a proper ILC.

That's so true. DPR should change its forum format, to allow a more interactive structure. I hope they devote resources for that. Even just a standard Gallery Feature on top of each forum, versus having to create a thread for it, will be neat.

What you describe sounds like could be a more modern version of Flickr! If DPR did add that it might be trying to do too many things at once since it does news too. You’ll find though if forums change too much or not enough they can lose users a lot. I feel DPR and FM forums have done fairly well with retaining users but some other forums really died down.

 Dlee13's gear list:Dlee13's gear list
Canon EOS M5 Canon EF-M 22mm f/2 STM Canon EOS R6 Canon EOS M50 II Canon EF 50mm F1.8 STM +5 more
Tom-C Senior Member • Posts: 1,366
Re: EOS R6 Vs iPhone 13 Pro for Photography (PICS)
1

It's going to be a long time before any phone camera can do what my R5 + 100-500 can do now.

For example, this photo of a wind surfer well offshore was taken at 500 mm and then I cropped from the R5's 45 megapixels down to 18 megapixels.

Road's End near Lincoln City Oregon

To be fair, my iPhone is a lot better when it comes to phone calls and texting.

 Tom-C's gear list:Tom-C's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Canon EOS R5
grenow
grenow Regular Member • Posts: 104
Re: To grenow - Re: iPhone 13 Pro images (PICS)

Thanks for the feedback, Marco. Quorra looks like a special feline, and those shots of Sydney are reminding me what we’ve been missing because of COVID. Can’t wait to cross the Tasman and catch up with family and friends, without doing MIQ on the way back!

 grenow's gear list:grenow's gear list
Canon EOS R6 Canon RF 24-105mm F4L IS USM Canon RF 35mm F1.8 IS STM Macro Canon RF 600mm F11 IS STM Canon RF 70-200 F4 L +2 more
AlgarvePhotography Forum Member • Posts: 96
Re: EOS R6 Vs iPhone 13 Pro for Photography (PICS)
1

Tom-C wrote:

It's going to be a long time before any phone camera can do what my R5 + 100-500 can do now.

For example, this photo of a wind surfer well offshore was taken at 500 mm and then I cropped from the R5's 45 megapixels down to 18 megapixels.

Road's End near Lincoln City Oregon

To be fair, my iPhone is a lot better when it comes to phone calls and texting.

I don't think anyone is comparing an R5 with 100-500 to a smartphone. My R5 with 100-500 with 2x extender means I can get reach no smartphone can emulate. My RF70-200 2.8 has far better quality and the bokeh from the RF28-70 is jaw-droppingly fantastic.

What we can begin to do is compare a smartphone with high-end P&S cameras like the Sony RX100 series given that the new Sony Xperia Pro-I has the same sensor and, early reviews suggest, better software.

I really liked my Sony RX100 cameras, ideal for slipping into a pocket and going for a walk. We can now do that with a smartphone and get the same quality. Amazing really and goes a whole lot further than just making calls and texting.

 AlgarvePhotography's gear list:AlgarvePhotography's gear list
Canon EOS R5 GoPro Hero9 Black Canon RF 16mm F2.8 STM Canon RF 24-240mm F4-6.3 Canon RF 24-105mm F4L IS USM +4 more
Lars Contributing Member • Posts: 752
Re: EOS R6 Vs iPhone 13 Pro for Photography (PICS)

AlgarvePhotography wrote:

...

I don't think anyone is comparing an R5 with 100-500 to a smartphone.

Well. The tread title says R6 vs Iphne 13 Pro. It IS about comparing to a FF camera.

My R5 with 100-500 with 2x extender means I can get reach no smartphone can emulate. My RF70-200 2.8 has far better quality and the bokeh from the RF28-70 is jaw-droppingly fantastic.

What we can begin to do is compare a smartphone with high-end P&S cameras like the Sony RX100 series given that the new Sony Xperia Pro-I has the same sensor and, early reviews suggest, better software.

I really liked my Sony RX100 cameras, ideal for slipping into a pocket and going for a walk. We can now do that with a smartphone and get the same quality. Amazing really and goes a whole lot further than just making calls and texting.

The Sony Phone will have a 1" sensor, but will actually only use a much smaller portion of that sensor. So it remains to be seen what the real benefit over a Iphone 13" will be. But my RX100 V indead stays home a lot now.

 Lars's gear list:Lars's gear list
Nikon Z6 II Nikon Z 100-400mm Nikon Z 24-70mm F2.8 Nikon Z 70-200 F2.8 VR Nikon Nikkor Z 24-120mm F4 S +14 more
AlgarvePhotography Forum Member • Posts: 96
Re: EOS R6 Vs iPhone 13 Pro for Photography (PICS)

Lars wrote:

AlgarvePhotography wrote:

...

I don't think anyone is comparing an R5 with 100-500 to a smartphone.

Well. The tread title says R6 vs Iphne 13 Pro. It IS about comparing to a FF camera.

My R5 with 100-500 with 2x extender means I can get reach no smartphone can emulate. My RF70-200 2.8 has far better quality and the bokeh from the RF28-70 is jaw-droppingly fantastic.

What we can begin to do is compare a smartphone with high-end P&S cameras like the Sony RX100 series given that the new Sony Xperia Pro-I has the same sensor and, early reviews suggest, better software.

I really liked my Sony RX100 cameras, ideal for slipping into a pocket and going for a walk. We can now do that with a smartphone and get the same quality. Amazing really and goes a whole lot further than just making calls and texting.

The Sony Phone will have a 1" sensor, but will actually only use a much smaller portion of that sensor. So it remains to be seen what the real benefit over a Iphone 13" will be. But my RX100 V indead stays home a lot now.

The iphone 13 IS worthy of comparison as a photography tool to a FF camera in terms of ease of use and other practical considerations as already discussed, especially if the end-user only shares images on small screens.

I was responding specifically to the REACH from an R5 with 100-500....no smartphone can do that with any degree of acceptable clarity. Samsung's headline 100x zoom is rubbish and pure marketing nonsense.

Early reviews absolutely demonstrate that the Sony smartphone IS better than the iPhone et al already - it has proper bokeh, not artificial and it does seem to be using the whole sensor, it even adjusts real aperture from 2.0 - 4.0, you can see the blades move.

The fact is, smartphones at the high-end ARE viable alternatives now for many photographers who do not want to carry a larger piece of equipment with them all the time. Obviously if you are a very serious amateur wanting to push personal artistic/creative limits or Pro wedding photographer, sports or wildlife, you will want full-size tools with specific lenses and accessories for the job at hand. If not, today's smartphones are pretty good alternatives for most photography applications.

I have the R5, nice RF lenses, GoPro 10, DJI drones, iPhone 13 - a lot of choice and ALL have their place, all take nice pictures for social media sharing and I like that I am able to have a camera on my person at all times that can deliver, whether I'm training for my next MTB race, road race, hiking, walking the dog, on holiday or just relaxing in my garden.

 AlgarvePhotography's gear list:AlgarvePhotography's gear list
Canon EOS R5 GoPro Hero9 Black Canon RF 16mm F2.8 STM Canon RF 24-240mm F4-6.3 Canon RF 24-105mm F4L IS USM +4 more
Marco Nero
OP Marco Nero Veteran Member • Posts: 7,430
To: LARS - iPhone LOWLIGHT + BOKEH (PICS)

Lars wrote:

I love my IPhone 11 PM and am impressed by what I read about the 13PM. Apple has done a great job here.

But there is a world beyond 70mm. There is a world in low light.

.

I've just seen some really impressive images from an S21 Ultra with its 100x zoom.  It has a 108MP sensor with a 10x Optical Zoom on one of its lenses... which is quite a feat considering the size of the device.  I am seeing complaints against all of the latest cameras, regardless of brand though.  So they're good but perhaps not perfect (yet).
.
Last night I had some fairly clear skies after sunset to I drove out to the mountains to try and snap the Milky Way before it dropped below the horizon... but a crescent moon in the sky resulted in washed out images and ruined any details.  Handheld lowlight shots taken at home are simply fantastic, but I noticed that when taking these night shots with longer exposures that the iphone kept flashing the words "Keep steady" when taking them... which suggests it can be done handheld.  I'll have to look into that.
.

iPhone 13 Pro (Max) - The Milky Way was wiped out by the moonglow.

iPhone 13 Pro (Max) - Shot from a bridge last night.

iPhone 13 Pro (Max) - Still too much moonglow in the sky. But you can just make out the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) on the top right - which is a Dwarf Galaxy that orbits our own.  I also caught Andromeda (the galaxy) in an image (not shown).

iPhone 13 Pro (Max) - The local church last night.

There is Bokeh that no Smartphone manufacturer manages to fake well. There are fast-moving kids and pets and wildlife. In some places, Smartphone manufacturers have made great strides with computations/AI and they will continue to do so. But there is a limit with the small sensors.

It's great that worlds converge. But I cannot imagine giving up on FF cameras soon.

.
Artificial Bokeh
The synthetic bokeh produced by the modern smartphone cameras is actually very impressive.  With the current iPhones, LIDAR is used to create depth map of the scene within around one second and then the camera captures one image before applying the depth map.  After rendering the fake bokeh (which occurs instantly), the phone then saves both the original unedited image plus the one with the bokeh.  This can be handy because reflective surfaces and transparent subject can occasionally outsmart the depth map.  You can then layer both images together to retrieve or repair anything that was missed or accidentally blurred.  I can see Canon doing this someday using "Bokeh Assist" where the camera can perhaps create stronger bokeh than the sensor could naturally apply.  This might impact lenses though so perhaps they might only introduce it to their compact cameras... assuming they make more in future.
.
I saw two reviews of the iPhone 13 which claimed that the slightly larger sensor (compared to previous models) was the reason why the bokeh was so much bolder... but I disagree with this assessment.  From what I can see, the cause is entirely due to advances in software development.  I don't see how minor changes in sensor size offer much for bokeh rendering although the wider aperture lenses help a little.
.

iPhone 13 Pro (Max) - Completely artificial bokeh generated by the camera.

iPhone 13 Pro (Max) - Subtle bokeh - based on the distance calculated by the LIDAR.

iPhone 13 Pro (Max) - Strong artificial bokeh.

You can see the errors in this image... between the spokes on the electric bike's front wheel there are gaps that were not applied to the blur algorithm.  I've left them intact to show the shortcomings.  But this is a fairly complicated subject for the iPhone to scan and subtract from.

iPhone 13 Pro (Max) - Impressive Artificial Blur applied (synthetic bokeh).

.
Now that 77mm (3x f/2.8) lens on the iPhone seems to be a weak link in the chain.  I've seen so many folks claim that this is their favorite lens and yet day or night, I cannot be assured of quality images from that lens.  Less than one in 20 shots I've taken with the 2x lens comes close to being useful to me.  It really doesn't look remotely like an optical zoom was used.  Most of the shots from the 3x lens look like digital zoom to my eyes.  Perhaps I'm doing something wrong?

-- hide signature --

Regards,
Marco Nero.

 Marco Nero's gear list:Marco Nero's gear list
Canon EOS M6 Canon EOS Ra Canon EOS R6 Canon EF-M 32mm F1.4 Canon RF 85mm F1.2L USM +20 more
m100
m100 Senior Member • Posts: 1,270
Re: To: LARS - iPhone LOWLIGHT + BOKEH (PICS)

Marco Nero wrote:

Lars wrote:

I love my IPhone 11 PM and am impressed by what I read about the 13PM. Apple has done a great job here.

But there is a world beyond 70mm. There is a world in low light.

.

I've just seen some really impressive images from an S21 Ultra with its 100x zoom. It has a 108MP sensor with a 10x Optical Zoom on one of its lenses... which is quite a feat considering the size of the device. I am seeing complaints against all of the latest cameras, regardless of brand though. So they're good but perhaps not perfect (yet).
.
Last night I had some fairly clear skies after sunset to I drove out to the mountains to try and snap the Milky Way before it dropped below the horizon... but a crescent moon in the sky resulted in washed out images and ruined any details. Handheld lowlight shots taken at home are simply fantastic, but I noticed that when taking these night shots with longer exposures that the iphone kept flashing the words "Keep steady" when taking them... which suggests it can be done handheld. I'll have to look into that.
.

iPhone 13 Pro (Max) - The Milky Way was wiped out by the moonglow.

iPhone 13 Pro (Max) - Shot from a bridge last night.

iPhone 13 Pro (Max) - Still too much moonglow in the sky. But you can just make out the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) on the top right - which is a Dwarf Galaxy that orbits our own. I also caught Andromeda (the galaxy) in an image (not shown).

iPhone 13 Pro (Max) - The local church last night.

There is Bokeh that no Smartphone manufacturer manages to fake well. There are fast-moving kids and pets and wildlife. In some places, Smartphone manufacturers have made great strides with computations/AI and they will continue to do so. But there is a limit with the small sensors.

It's great that worlds converge. But I cannot imagine giving up on FF cameras soon.

.
Artificial Bokeh
The synthetic bokeh produced by the modern smartphone cameras is actually very impressive. With the current iPhones, LIDAR is used to create depth map of the scene within around one second and then the camera captures one image before applying the depth map. After rendering the fake bokeh (which occurs instantly), the phone then saves both the original unedited image plus the one with the bokeh. This can be handy because reflective surfaces and transparent subject can occasionally outsmart the depth map. You can then layer both images together to retrieve or repair anything that was missed or accidentally blurred. I can see Canon doing this someday using "Bokeh Assist" where the camera can perhaps create stronger bokeh than the sensor could naturally apply. This might impact lenses though so perhaps they might only introduce it to their compact cameras... assuming they make more in future.
.
I saw two reviews of the iPhone 13 which claimed that the slightly larger sensor (compared to previous models) was the reason why the bokeh was so much bolder... but I disagree with this assessment. From what I can see, the cause is entirely due to advances in software development. I don't see how minor changes in sensor size offer much for bokeh rendering although the wider aperture lenses help a little.
.

iPhone 13 Pro (Max) - Completely artificial bokeh generated by the camera.

iPhone 13 Pro (Max) - Subtle bokeh - based on the distance calculated by the LIDAR.

iPhone 13 Pro (Max) - Strong artificial bokeh.

You can see the errors in this image... between the spokes on the electric bike's front wheel there are gaps that were not applied to the blur algorithm. I've left them intact to show the shortcomings. But this is a fairly complicated subject for the iPhone to scan and subtract from.

iPhone 13 Pro (Max) - Impressive Artificial Blur applied (synthetic bokeh).

.
Now that 77mm (3x f/2.8) lens on the iPhone seems to be a weak link in the chain. I've seen so many folks claim that this is their favorite lens and yet day or night, I cannot be assured of quality images from that lens. Less than one in 20 shots I've taken with the 2x lens comes close to being useful to me. It really doesn't look remotely like an optical zoom was used. Most of the shots from the 3x lens look like digital zoom to my eyes. Perhaps I'm doing something wrong?

Who makes the best polarizer filter for a phone camera ?    I really like good ones.

-- hide signature --

" It's a virus that hitches a ride on our love and our trust for other people. "
Dr. Celine Gounder

Marco Nero
OP Marco Nero Veteran Member • Posts: 7,430
To: m100 - Re CPL filters

m100 wrote:

Who makes the best polarizer filter for a phone camera ? I really like good ones.

There's perhaps a half a dozen top quality polarizers out there today. But if you want one for an iPhone, the Ultra Wide lens makes it very hard to hide your fingers when you hold one up to the camera module. It's actually easier to use a larger filter or buy a clip on system that accepts a filter so you can keep your fingers out of the way.
.

My 43mm HOYA 'FUSION' series CPL filter -  sold in North America as the "EVO" series.

.
The best filters that I prefer to use are the relatively new Hoya FUSION (also known as EVO) series filters. The Circular Polariser from this series has nano coatings as well as an oleophobic anti-static coating to repel oils, water and dust. Unless you have a need to expose translucency in water or glass, you're better to avoid fitting one to an iPhone and just use them on camera lenses instead.  I tried using a 43mm CPL filter from this series on my iPhone and found the results were almost the same from the camera.  These new types of filters, especially the HOYA EVO Antistatic UV types, can allow for 99.80% of light to pass through them... making them ideal for camera use today if light transmission is important.  If you don't see the EVO types available, you should be able to source the excellent HOYA Pro1D series of filters.  The Pro1D is what I'm presently using as a CPL filter on my RF 85mm f/1.2L USM lens.  These are simply excellent to use and are made especially for digital sensors and are more affordable whilst retaining image quality.
.

iPhone 13 Pro Max - with and without a CPL filter held in front of the lens module.
You won't see any difference unless you (1) rotate the filters properly, which requires two hands if it's not attached to a lens or (2) you need to be 90 degrees to the sun's position.

iPhone 13 Pro Max - Using a CPL filter to enhance cloud detail and color plus contrast.  Colors were set to "Cool Vivid" when this was taken.

NOT from an iphone - this is the type of banding you might expect to see from a CPL filter on a WIDE lens.

Effect of one of my CPL filters on the sky (Not an iPhone photograph)

The warming effect from a CPL filter in front of my home. It also removed the reflections from the sky over the water.

.
If you decide to use a CPL filter on an iphone, you may be forced to use whatever you can obtain.  Most of the clips for phone-cameras that you can buy online tend to have a filter threaded onto the clip and those filters will be pretty cheaply made.  I'd suggest finding out the filter threads and then replace it with a better one if you choose to go down that path.
.
Another consideration is that the iPhone 13 is so new that most of the accessories like this tend to be made for the iPhone 12 - which in turn has smaller camera optics.  You'll need to take that into consideration as well.
.

Canon EOS M camera - this is the sort of result I aim for when using a CPL filter.

-- hide signature --

Regards,
Marco Nero.

 Marco Nero's gear list:Marco Nero's gear list
Canon EOS M6 Canon EOS Ra Canon EOS R6 Canon EF-M 32mm F1.4 Canon RF 85mm F1.2L USM +20 more
shuutrr Regular Member • Posts: 456
Re: EOS R6 Vs iPhone 13 Pro for Photography (PICS)

Interesting, provoking, rather ominous at times, large discussion, I would say.

I have neither piece but the discussion certainly evokes pause.

shuutrr

 shuutrr's gear list:shuutrr's gear list
Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS STM Canon EOS 70D Canon EOS 6D Canon 6D Mark II Samsung NX20 +11 more
m100
m100 Senior Member • Posts: 1,270
Re: To: m100 - Re CPL filters

Marco Nero wrote:

m100 wrote:

Who makes the best polarizer filter for a phone camera ? I really like good ones.

There's perhaps a half a dozen top quality polarizers out there today. But if you want one for an iPhone, the Ultra Wide lens makes it very hard to hide your fingers when you hold one up to the camera module. It's actually easier to use a larger filter or buy a clip on system that accepts a filter so you can keep your fingers out of the way.
.

My 43mm HOYA 'FUSION' series CPL filter - sold in North America as the "EVO" series.

.
The best filters that I prefer to use are the relatively new Hoya FUSION (also known as EVO) series filters. The Circular Polariser from this series has nano coatings as well as an oleophobic anti-static coating to repel oils, water and dust. Unless you have a need to expose translucency in water or glass, you're better to avoid fitting one to an iPhone and just use them on camera lenses instead. I tried using a 43mm CPL filter from this series on my iPhone and found the results were almost the same from the camera. These new types of filters, especially the HOYA EVO Antistatic UV types, can allow for 99.80% of light to pass through them... making them ideal for camera use today if light transmission is important. If you don't see the EVO types available, you should be able to source the excellent HOYA Pro1D series of filters. The Pro1D is what I'm presently using as a CPL filter on my RF 85mm f/1.2L USM lens. These are simply excellent to use and are made especially for digital sensors and are more affordable whilst retaining image quality.
.

iPhone 13 Pro Max - with and without a CPL filter held in front of the lens module.You won't see any difference unless you (1) rotate the filters properly, which requires two hands if it's not attached to a lens or (2) you need to be 90 degrees to the sun's position.

iPhone 13 Pro Max - Using a CPL filter to enhance cloud detail and color plus contrast. Colors were set to "Cool Vivid" when this was taken.

NOT from an iphone - this is the type of banding you might expect to see from a CPL filter on a WIDE lens.

Effect of one of my CPL filters on the sky (Not an iPhone photograph)

The warming effect from a CPL filter in front of my home. It also removed the reflections from the sky over the water.

.
If you decide to use a CPL filter on an iphone, you may be forced to use whatever you can obtain. Most of the clips for phone-cameras that you can buy online tend to have a filter threaded onto the clip and those filters will be pretty cheaply made. I'd suggest finding out the filter threads and then replace it with a better one if you choose to go down that path.
.
Another consideration is that the iPhone 13 is so new that most of the accessories like this tend to be made for the iPhone 12 - which in turn has smaller camera optics. You'll need to take that into consideration as well.
.

Canon EOS M camera - this is the sort of result I aim for when using a CPL filter.

There are no threads on that camera to mount a CPL filter !

When Apple gets serious about photography they will put filter threads on their cameras ?

Those clip on things do no look very pro or max ?

-- hide signature --

" It's a virus that hitches a ride on our love and our trust for other people. "
Dr. Celine Gounder

Marco Nero
OP Marco Nero Veteran Member • Posts: 7,430
Re: To: m100 - Re CPL filters

m100 wrote:

There are no threads on that camera to mount a CPL filter !

There are no threads on the lenses of Apple Smartphones.  There are some companies that make stick-on filters and protective filters that adhere to your smartphone lenses.
.

iPhone 13 Pro series camera module

.

When Apple gets serious about photography they will put filter threads on their cameras ?

Apple was the first company to get serious about putting in a quality camera to their earliest models.  The CEO (the late Steve Jobs) insisted Canon not release their iPhones until the latest available technology with the best possible camera was installed prior to release. 
.
There's no point in adding filter threads to smartphones.  One thing I expect them to add is an Neutral Density Filter which can be turned on or off to slide it in front of the sensor, much the same way Canon have been doing this with their Subcompact Cameras in the past. Since the design of the camera changes each year, and because there are no camera lens filters this small (though some exist for Drones), there's no point in adding filter threats at this point.

Those clip on things do no look very pro or max ?

Some fit the older iPhone 12 Pro models.  They can sometimes look ridiculous.  But they work - as long as you buy one designed to suit your model of camera.

-- hide signature --

Regards,
Marco Nero.

 Marco Nero's gear list:Marco Nero's gear list
Canon EOS M6 Canon EOS Ra Canon EOS R6 Canon EF-M 32mm F1.4 Canon RF 85mm F1.2L USM +20 more
m100
m100 Senior Member • Posts: 1,270
Re: To: m100 - Re CPL filters

Marco Nero wrote:

m100 wrote:

There are no threads on that camera to mount a CPL filter !

There are no threads on the lenses of Apple Smartphones. There are some companies that make stick-on filters and protective filters that adhere to your smartphone lenses.
.

iPhone 13 Pro series camera module

.

When Apple gets serious about photography they will put filter threads on their cameras ?

Apple was the first company to get serious about putting in a quality camera to their earliest models. The CEO (the late Steve Jobs) insisted Canon not release their iPhones until the latest available technology with the best possible camera was installed prior to release.
.
There's no point in adding filter threads to smartphones. One thing I expect them to add is an Neutral Density Filter which can be turned on or off to slide it in front of the sensor, much the same way Canon have been doing this with their Subcompact Cameras in the past. Since the design of the camera changes each year, and because there are no camera lens filters this small (though some exist for Drones), there's no point in adding filter threats at this point.

Those clip on things do no look very pro or max ?

Some fit the older iPhone 12 Pro models. They can sometimes look ridiculous. But they work - as long as you buy one designed to suit your model of camera.

I looked. Where can one buy a high quality clip on lens filter adapter that will hold a high quality CPL filter ?

Maybe you could glue a filter ring to the front of the camera ?

I was thinking an Apple camera could do the car show if it had a good CPL on it.

If the clip comes loose and my not cheap CPL filter falls and breaks that will be it though.

All serious cameras have filter threads so that a CPL filter can be mounted ?

It is small toy cameras that do not ?

-- hide signature --

" It's a virus that hitches a ride on our love and our trust for other people. "
Dr. Celine Gounder

Wayne Larmon Forum Pro • Posts: 10,686
No clip-on--use a proper phone case lens mount
1

m100 wrote:

Marco Nero wrote:

m100 wrote:

Those clip on things do no look very pro or max ?

Some fit the older iPhone 12 Pro models. They can sometimes look ridiculous. But they work - as long as you buy one designed to suit your model of camera.

I looked. Where can one buy a high quality clip on lens filter adapter that will hold a high quality CPL filter ?

Moment and Sirui make high quality lenses for phones. They both use the same mount. I started with a Moment case designed for my Pixel 2 and have a Moment Superfish and Moment Wide. I have a Sirui 60mm tele that fits my Moment lens mount case.

Moment doesn't make a CPL but Sirui does.

Sirui Wide-Angle Circular Polarizer Filter

[2nd edit: I overlooked that this CPL mounts on the Sirui 18mm Wide-Angle Lens (Black) with Lens Clip Adapter, which mounts to a Moment/Sirui phone lens/mount case. I haven't tested this combination myself. ]

[3rd edit: Moment does have a CPL that mounts directly on a Moment phone case mount. 37mm Cine CPL Phone Filter Bundle has two parts: a 37mm CPL and a moment lens mount to 37mm adapter.  No additional lens is needed.]

B&H search of 'Sirui lens' shows a lot of Phone cases and lenses. Moment will be selling an iPhone 13 Pro Max case which will probably fit a Sirui CPL

[Edit: I just took a close look at the Moment iPhone 13 Pro Max case and you need to also order a slip-on lens mount.]

So you get either a Moment or Sirui phone case that fits your phone and then get whichever Moment or Sirui lenses you want.

I really like my Moment Superfish lens on my Pixel 2. I have a Pixel 6 Pro but the Moment cases for those aren't shipping.

I've never used the Sirui CPL so I can't say how well it works. But Sirui lenses are good. Near as I can tell the Moment (or Sirui) fisheye lens is the only civilized way to get a 14mm(ish) fisheye on a phone.

Wayne

Marco Nero
OP Marco Nero Veteran Member • Posts: 7,430
Re: To: m100 - Re CPL filters

m100 wrote:

I looked. Where can one buy a high quality clip on lens filter adapter that will hold a high quality CPL filter ?

Ebay and Amazon have them. Most smartphone filter clips appear to be 37mm in diameter so you'll have to source a decent filter of the same diameter.   They usually ship with a cheap one attached.

Maybe you could glue a filter ring to the front of the camera ?

That's what some of the 3rd party options do.  But then you end up with dark pictures when not shooting outdoors in bright daylight.

I was thinking an Apple camera could do the car show if it had a good CPL on it.

You don't really need a CPL filter if you want to photograph cars.  Red is perhaps the hardest color for digital cameras to get right and using a CPL filter can help remove reflection but only in daylight.

If the clip comes loose and my not cheap CPL filter falls and breaks that will be it though.

Even worse if you drop your phone off a bridge or onto rocks.  Same with your camera.

All serious cameras have filter threads so that a CPL filter can be mounted ?

The world's best Ultra Wide professional 14mm L-series lenses have no filter threads because the front lens is curved and cannot accept one.   Most of the larger White L-series Professional lenses don't have filter threads either.  They don't even make filters that size, hence the development of a drop-in filter module on some lenses towards the rear elements.

It is small toy cameras that do not ?

Pretty sure that Apple's AUD $2,719.00 iPhone 13 Pro Max with a 1TB hard drive isn't a 'toy camera' at that price.

-- hide signature --

Regards,
Marco Nero.

 Marco Nero's gear list:Marco Nero's gear list
Canon EOS M6 Canon EOS Ra Canon EOS R6 Canon EF-M 32mm F1.4 Canon RF 85mm F1.2L USM +20 more
m100
m100 Senior Member • Posts: 1,270
Re: To: m100 - Re CPL filters

Marco Nero wrote:

m100 wrote:

I looked. Where can one buy a high quality clip on lens filter adapter that will hold a high quality CPL filter ?

Ebay and Amazon have them. Most smartphone filter clips appear to be 37mm in diameter so you'll have to source a decent filter of the same diameter. They usually ship with a cheap one attached.

Maybe you could glue a filter ring to the front of the camera ?

That's what some of the 3rd party options do. But then you end up with dark pictures when not shooting outdoors in bright daylight.

I was thinking an Apple camera could do the car show if it had a good CPL on it.

You don't really need a CPL filter if you want to photograph cars. Red is perhaps the hardest color for digital cameras to get right and using a CPL filter can help remove reflection but only in daylight.

If the clip comes loose and my not cheap CPL filter falls and breaks that will be it though.

Even worse if you drop your phone off a bridge or onto rocks. Same with your camera.

All serious cameras have filter threads so that a CPL filter can be mounted ?

The world's best Ultra Wide professional 14mm L-series lenses have no filter threads because the front lens is curved and cannot accept one. Most of the larger White L-series Professional lenses don't have filter threads either. They don't even make filters that size, hence the development of a drop-in filter module on some lenses towards the rear elements.

It is small toy cameras that do not ?

Pretty sure that Apple's AUD $2,719.00 iPhone 13 Pro Max with a 1TB hard drive isn't a 'toy camera' at that price.

I have been photographing cars and bikes since 2014. I need a CPL filter. Cars at the car shows are like colored curved mirrors reflecting all over each other.  Being able to control those reflections requires a CPL filter.

-- hide signature --

" It's a virus that hitches a ride on our love and our trust for other people. "
Dr. Celine Gounder

Wayne Larmon Forum Pro • Posts: 10,686
Re: To: m100 - Re CPL filters
1

m100 wrote:

I have been photographing cars and bikes since 2014. I need a CPL filter. Cars at the car shows are like colored curved mirrors reflecting all over each other. Being able to control those reflections requires a CPL filter.

You are both ignoring my post on how to get a CPL with a proper lens mount for your iPhones

Wayne

m100
m100 Senior Member • Posts: 1,270
Re: To: m100 - Re CPL filters

Wayne Larmon wrote:

m100 wrote:

I have been photographing cars and bikes since 2014. I need a CPL filter. Cars at the car shows are like colored curved mirrors reflecting all over each other. Being able to control those reflections requires a CPL filter.

You are both ignoring my post on how to get a CPL with a proper lens mount for your iPhones

Wayne

Sorry. Thank you for that answer and the links.

-- hide signature --

" It's a virus that hitches a ride on our love and our trust for other people. "
Dr. Celine Gounder

Wayne Larmon Forum Pro • Posts: 10,686
Re: To: m100 - Re CPL filters

m100 wrote:

Wayne Larmon wrote:

m100 wrote:

I have been photographing cars and bikes since 2014. I need a CPL filter. Cars at the car shows are like colored curved mirrors reflecting all over each other. Being able to control those reflections requires a CPL filter.

You are both ignoring my post on how to get a CPL with a proper lens mount for your iPhones

Wayne

Sorry. Thank you for that answer and the links.

And a sorry from me. It took me until just now before I found the combination that gives you a CPL solidly mounted to a Moment case.

The Moment 37mm Cine CPL Phone Filter Bundle has two parts: a 37mm CPL and a Moment mount to 37mm adapter. It looks like this:

I just updated my above post with this information but now it has a whole lot of links to wade through. You only need one more link:

Moment Clear Case for iPhone 13

(which needs the optional "Moment Drop-in Lens Mount for iPhone 13 Pro & Pro Max" that is on the above page.)

Wayne

Max5150 Contributing Member • Posts: 921
Love hate relationship
1

I love having a camera with me all the time. It offers unlimited opportunities to capture moments and to  experiment and improve, but I absolutely hate taking pictures with my phone. It's so limiting and figity to use. I wish they would just come out with a separate camera module that simply plugged into your phone that had a bigger sensor and lens, and a couple dials to change settings. It could easily be small enough to keep in your pocket. I'd buy it in a heartbeat!

Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads