Burnt out on my x100f

Started 7 months ago | Discussions
Les Lammers
Les Lammers Veteran Member • Posts: 4,206
Re: Burnt out on my x100f
1

Brian Homer wrote:

Different kit is rarely the answer and having a choice of FLs is not necessarily the answer. I think everyone goes through periods of wondering why I certainly have. Having a purpose can help so way back when I was doing more pro work I dropped casual photography for instance. Rather than thinking about kit why not set yourself some projects (ideally fun and interesting). They could be anything that you find interesting - other hobbies, neighbourhood, etc and using the camera you already have create a series of images that tell a story. The native lens on your F is 35mm equivalent and that has been used for many documentary and art images over the years. And don't forget in .jpg only you have the digital zoom which works well enough for your immediate purposes and gives you 50 and 70mm equivalents to try out. 35, 50 and 70 are plenty to cover a project from wider environmental shots to closer portrait images.

I used the digital zoom on my X-100V at the Grand Canyon. It was hazy and smokey from the western fires. I was pleased with the results.

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Siralgovia Forum Member • Posts: 92
Re: Burnt out on my x100f
3

I have my 'arsenal' of cameras and lenses and I use different cameras and different lenses on different days. Each camera/lens has its own quirks and switching keeps up the excitement for me. I'm definitely a hobby photographer and the cameras themselves give me joy, I don't just use them strictly as tools, they are also my toys. But to battle GAS I made a pact with myself that I won't buy anything new unless I sell a piece of my current collection.

Fuji Xpro-1 and X-A2, Samsung Galaxy NX and NX Mini, Ricoh GXR and all modules, Panasonic G9 and GM-1. There are countless variations here with different lenses. The G9 is my main camera and I just took it to and used it in Germany for 3 weeks (along with the X-A2 which I had bought there and left at my parents' house). When I got back I also was a little 'burnt out' on the G9 and am using my Samsungs for a while now. That way things stay fresh.

I can imagine a professional photographer will shake their head reading this. I'm a professional skier and own a ski school, I don't care which ski I'm on as long as it works for the class I'm teaching. If I teach bumps all week I don't get burned out on the ski I'm using as long as it does the job. Though I have several of my 'hobby skier' students who own a collection of very similar spec'ed skis and they switch them around, but for the most part switching skis does not make them better skiers.

biza43 Forum Pro • Posts: 14,359
Re: Burnt out on my x100f
2

Do you want to:

1. Become a gear expert?

2. Or a good photographer?

If #2, then start studying the art and practicing and, once you have the camera set up the way you want it, forget about it.

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bastibe Contributing Member • Posts: 913
Re: Burnt out on my x100f
6

selrond wrote:

I still love to take my x100f out when there's some interesting place I'm going, and still love getting surprised by much better output than what I saw on that tiny LCD while reviewing the shot after the fact. It's just that I wish these moments would appear much more frequently. I guess such is life though.

To me, this sounds like you're growing as a photographer. I know the feeling. The more you learn, the better you get, the higher you set the bar for a "good" shot. Scenes that used to be exciting now look mundane, hardly worth a shot.

It can be demoralizing. Your appreciation for pictures has grown, but your ability to take them has not yet caught up. It can feel like you "lost your mojo". But in reality it might be a sign of the opposite. I find that doubling down on that feeling, and searching the good shot regardless, is extremely worthwhile. For me, this feeling marks times of growth.

When I look back on my pictures over the years, I can identify many such phases. The one where I started positioning things off-center. The one where I started thinking about framing. The one where I realized it's about light, not scene. And on and on. I only notice the realization in retrospect. But that feeling you describe was there at the time.

Regarding gear; I know playing with gear is part of my hobby. It gives me joy. I like toys. So long as this does not replace the joy of photography, I see nothing wrong with that. Personally, I don't like to be stuck at single focal length forever, nor with a single camera.

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DaveyA Junior Member • Posts: 39
Re: Burnt out on my x100f
3

What an interesting and sympathetic reply.

I  have recently noticed that somewhere over my shoulder is a voice asking 'just why are you taking these shots, where and how will you store them, for whose benefit, and how often will they be seen again once they have been  filed.....'

I don't have any convincing  answers, and it troubles me somewhat. The best i have come up with to combat this slough (and not being much of a projects person) is to switch into monochrome shooting, which has felt refreshing.

And to enoy Omar's videos!

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GreatOceanSoftware
GreatOceanSoftware Contributing Member • Posts: 665
Re: Burnt out on my x100f
1

bastibe wrote:

selrond wrote:

I still love to take my x100f out when there's some interesting place I'm going, and still love getting surprised by much better output than what I saw on that tiny LCD while reviewing the shot after the fact. It's just that I wish these moments would appear much more frequently. I guess such is life though.

To me, this sounds like you're growing as a photographer. I know the feeling. The more you learn, the better you get, the higher you set the bar for a "good" shot. Scenes that used to be exciting now look mundane, hardly worth a shot.

It can be demoralizing. Your appreciation for pictures has grown, but your ability to take them has not yet caught up. It can feel like you "lost your mojo". But in reality it might be a sign of the opposite. I find that doubling down on that feeling, and searching the good shot regardless, is extremely worthwhile. For me, this feeling marks times of growth.

When I look back on my pictures over the years, I can identify many such phases. The one where I started positioning things off-center. The one where I started thinking about framing. The one where I realized it's about light, not scene. And on and on. I only notice the realization in retrospect. But that feeling you describe was there at the time.

Regarding gear; I know playing with gear is part of my hobby. It gives me joy. I like toys. So long as this does not replace the joy of photography, I see nothing wrong with that. Personally, I don't like to be stuck at single focal length forever, nor with a single camera.

This!

The only thing I can add is I’m a bit obsessed with getting it right in the field. I shoot RAW + JPEG just in case, and I probably have way more shutter actuations than necessary, but it may be that obsession that keeps me challenged.

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Truman Prevatt
Truman Prevatt Forum Pro • Posts: 13,395
Re: Burnt out on my x100f
1

selrond wrote:

Wow, I didn't expect so many interesting responses.

Thank you for taking your time to respond, appreciate it!

As I see it (considering your inputs as well), I might have got a bit bored by shooting exclusively through one 23mm FL. I'm well aware about GAS in general, I'd realized many times that new shiny stuff lasts only a while.

I realize I might have given this thread too harsh of a title - I don't think I'm burnt out - I still love to take my x100f out when there's some interesting place I'm going, and still love getting surprised by much better output than what I saw on that tiny LCD while reviewing the shot after the fact. It's just that I wish these moments would appear much more frequently. I guess such is life though.

However, you gave me a lot of intriguing ideas to think about (the idea of photography projects in new to me) so thank for that!

Regarding renting as couple of you suggested - where I live (Slovakia) - there are not many opportunities to rent fuji stuff, but I'll have one more look.

W. Eugene Smith famously said, "often times the world doesn't fit nicely into a 2x3 frame."  Of course that was part of the debate between Smith and the disciples of Henri Cartire-Bresson who did not believe in cropping an image.  However, the same is true in that often times the world is not best represented by a 55 degree filed of view lens.

I found over 50 years that changing my "standard" most used lens often kick starts my interest.  I have gone from primary using a (in APSC terms) 35, 23, 18, 50 at different times as my standard lens. They all view the world a little differently because the focal length determines the magnification profile - both lateral and longitudinal - and that changes the perspective of the image.   I started out with (here APSC equivalents) a 35 and used it solely for about two years.  The I picked up a 23 but didn't particularly care for it but forced myself to use it for a year.  I went back to the 35 and used the 23 every once in awhile.  I then picked up an 18 and forced myself to use it mostly all the time for a year.  Then I did the same thing with the 50.  I forced myself to see the world through the perspective of those focal lengths and to used those to tell my story.  That often meant figuring out how to tell the same story differently but it helped me grow.  Now I use my 35 about 75% of the time followed with the 50 about 15% and the 23 and 18 combined about 10% of the time.

So other than jumping at a new shinny toy, an ILC might be what you need to give yourself a kick start.

The other thing is instead of concentrating on a single image - tell a story.  The photo essay is a powerful tool.  If one picture is worth a 1000 words, a series of pictures exploring the same scene could be worth a novel.

Just remember photography is not about the destination - it's about the journey.

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eya1 Regular Member • Posts: 321
Re: Burnt out on my x100f
3

selrond wrote:

A little story of mine if I might:

I bought myself x100f about 2 years ago as my first camera ever, partly because of my long-time interest in hobby photography but mainly because our kid was born, and I wanted to capture the fleeting memories for years to come.

It was an investment.

What followed was the pure joy and excitement of learning to work with the camera, learning the basics of photography, work with the scene, the moment, the light, then editing and so on. I was documenting every family gathering, almost every day of our family life, etc. I was taking x100f with me everywhere. I loved it.

But then, after a year or so, I've noticed I use it less and less. Somehow the excitement wore off, or disappeared. I also started noticing the imperfections and limitations of the lens (f/2 closeup performance...). Suddenly, I was not finding interesting scenes / subjects to shoot. The film simulation colors got boring. The focal length got boring.

In parallel to the gradual boredom with x100f, I've started to look at various other focal lengths & thus bodies as well (X-T3, X-T4). In fact, I've even started saving up for the X-T4. I'm finding it to be really exciting to look at the output of various lenses and what I'd be able to do with them (GAS?)

My concern though is this:

What if the same thing repeats and I find myself with x100f & X-T4 with a couple of lenses and a couple of thousands spent on it, not finding joy in it like it seem to be now?

And - more generally - has anybody had a similar experience to mine? Being burnt out on photography / camera, not knowing why? (It's my hobby, I'm not forced to it).

I'm not even sure I ask the right thing, just tried to summarize what's going through my head for some time now.

Thank you for any help

I exclusively shot my original X100 from 2013-2017. I shot intimate portraits, photojournalism, dive bar gigs, concerts and just about everything else. I'm starved for subject matter in this lockdown or I would still be shooting. 
The camera is not the limitation. Get out more, if you can, my brother.

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EOS GUY
EOS GUY Senior Member • Posts: 5,342
Re: Burnt out on my x100f

At least with an ILC you can buy different lenses if you get bored.

Good gear keeps value real well too - so you never loose much, it's more like rental fees really if you keep it in good condition WITH BOXES - NEVER GET RID OF THE BOXES.

Example - I've had my X-T2 bought £500 Mint used low shutter count and a warranty over two years ago.  If I sold it today I'd get close to that back

Got my 23mm F2 brand new £279 (OK GM but hey) I could sell it for that today and minus ebay fees have paid about £15 a year to use it....

Again paid £239 (GM) for brand new 18-55 F2.8-4 LM OIS and could get exactly that or more back for it today as it;s mint condition still

I'd keep the F though, they are nice.  I had a T and loved it, so easy to shove in a jacket pocket and always get the shot when you never planned to go out to shoot.

Unless you have a budget, then sell it towards shiny new gear!

It's funny, a change of gear even if it's a duplicate (I went X-100 T to a Canon SL1 and 24mm F2.8 pancake lens to now an X-T2 and 23mm F2) always seems to make me go out and get better photos, literally better than before, I think it's due to the emotional and psychological commitment and investment.  And excitement.

Peace

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VfxByArt Regular Member • Posts: 441
Re: Burnt out on my x100f
2

a_c_skinner wrote:

You're bored with photography. A new camera won't help I think.

Agreed.  Find something or a reason to shoot.

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EOS GUY
EOS GUY Senior Member • Posts: 5,342
Re: Burnt out on my x100f
1

VfxByArt wrote:

a_c_skinner wrote:

You're bored with photography. A new camera won't help I think.

Agreed. Find something or a reason to shoot.

Hmmm think this is personal depending upon the individual

I went literally Nikon d5300 and 17-50 'F2.8 at 23mm for 18 months to an X-100 T for about 18 months to a canon Sl1 with 24mm f2.8 pancake for 2 years and now an X-t2 and 23mm f2 as my main street cameras and I got better shots each time....

The sl1 in fact was a 'lucky' camera and used to get me more keepers per outing than any other

Of course this cannot be measured or represented on a statistical scale etc but it is all true still

There's something about the newness that gives  a boost for some people.  I'm the same photographer with the same skills

Of course part of it can be attributed to getting better over time too

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Jerry-astro
MOD Jerry-astro Forum Pro • Posts: 18,471
Re: Burnt out on my x100f
2

EOS GUY wrote:

VfxByArt wrote:

a_c_skinner wrote:

You're bored with photography. A new camera won't help I think.

Agreed. Find something or a reason to shoot.

Hmmm think this is personal depending upon the individual

I went literally Nikon d5300 and 17-50 'F2.8 at 23mm for 18 months to an X-100 T for about 18 months to a canon Sl1 with 24mm f2.8 pancake for 2 years and now an X-t2 and 23mm f2 as my main street cameras and I got better shots each time....

The sl1 in fact was a 'lucky' camera and used to get me more keepers per outing than any other

Of course this cannot be measured or represented on a statistical scale etc but it is all true still

There's something about the newness that gives a boost for some people. I'm the same photographer with the same skills

Of course part of it can be attributed to getting better over time too

Yup.  To steal (and modify) a phrase from one of my favorite war movies... "I love the smell of a new camera in the morning."  Sometimes it's just the gear itself that provides additional motivation... in other cases, it's seeing your skills, keeper rates, etc. steadily improve.  It really doesn't matter as long as the hobby remains satisfying and enjoyable (and the rest of the bills keep getting paid along the way, as my bride keeps reminding me).

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Leolab Junior Member • Posts: 47
Re: Burnt out on my x100f

I got burned-out too.

I turned to film photography as a means to rekindle my interest in photography. I found digital to be too ‘easy’ …too easy to fire away at things that are not worth taking pictures of, too easy to not think about composition and lighting (with great ability to crop and alter shadows/highlights), too easy to get lost in the technical perfection (noise and noise reduction, resolution and megapixels), too easy to always nail exposure (with incredible ISO capabilities, auto-everything including AF). I still shoot digital but i enjoy shooting film more.

When everything comes together with film (lighting, focus, composition…) you feel like you created the image vs with digital you captured the image. The film cameras  themselves can sometimes be works of art or feats of enginnering and can be an absolute joy to operate as can the lenses…

I shoot B+W and develop my own at home, its actually pretty inexpensive and easy, including Medium Format.

Now i know that film is not for everyone, but IMHO its a great inexpensive way to reconnect with photography, and yes it does give a look that you cant’t easily replicate with digital…its just different.

Corot2 Senior Member • Posts: 1,672
Try photographing something new

The x100f and x100v are my go to cameras

It could be you are tired of photography, only you would know that.

I think the long term  restrictions  or confinement that everyone has experienced could be having an impact of one's enthusiasm to pursue his hobby and overall psychology.

If things return to normal maybe your enjoyment for photography will also return to normal.

I own many Fuji x cameras but my favorite is the x100f and x100v. Try new subjects, look at the master photographers for inspiration that may help. I find when reviewing the great street photographers of the 1950s I am inspired. Maybe watch a few youtube videos of the great photographers or others who have face the same problem.

I love to travel to Europe  and it stopped 2 years ago this January and since travel street photography is my  favorite thing,  I have been adjusting to the restricted environment

I believe changing a camera to bring back the pleasure won't do it. the excitement one has  from a new purchase is short lived.

Best of luck and watch a few videos it may help

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mcshan Veteran Member • Posts: 4,854
Re: Burnt out on my x100f
1

HI OP, I'm lucky in that I am near the ocean, a big city (Boston, Mass. USA) and small New England towns. New Hampshire and Maine are close. I have multiple cameras and lenses and I mix up the usage. I never run out of things to shoot. I appreciate the change in seasons but shoot far less during the cold winter. I still love my X100F but (!) am glad I have other cameras and lenses to choose from. I'm older and love photography even more these days.

I'd try shooting with something else especially a zoom lens. There are many nice cameras out there. No need for the latest model. It would only take something with a range of 24-70mm equivalent to open up a completely different world. You could do so without going broke.

Good luck in your future shooting.

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kamerakiri Regular Member • Posts: 379
Re: Burnt out on my x100f

selrond wrote:

Wow, I didn't expect so many interesting responses.

Thank you for taking your time to respond, appreciate it!

As I see it (considering your inputs as well), I might have got a bit bored by shooting exclusively through one 23mm FL. I'm well aware about GAS in general, I'd realized many times that new shiny stuff lasts only a while.

I realize I might have given this thread too harsh of a title - I don't think I'm burnt out - I still love to take my x100f out when there's some interesting place I'm going, and still love getting surprised by much better output than what I saw on that tiny LCD while reviewing the shot after the fact. It's just that I wish these moments would appear much more frequently. I guess such is life though.

However, you gave me a lot of intriguing ideas to think about (the idea of photography projects in new to me) so thank for that!

Regarding renting as couple of you suggested - where I live (Slovakia) - there are not many opportunities to rent fuji stuff, but I'll have one more look.

Slovakia - nice! There are many beautiful castles there.

One of the advantages of photography using a dedicated camera as opposed to a smartphone is the flexibility of using multiple lenses. Even camera manufacturers have understood this and now provide a minimum of two camera modules in every smartphones. An extra wide angle lens is always interesting.

23mm is not too wide on APS-C. But then it is not too tight either for portraits.

Don't limit yourself to one focal length. My suggestion for fun stuff is to look at vintage lenses. Get some of those cheap Helios lenses that are still very affordable in Eastern Europe. Some of those old Hexanons and Takumars. They will make portraits so beautiful and magical, unlike anything that 23mm can ever achieve.

Get some funky wide angle - like a 12mm manual lens. It transforms the experience of shooting landscapes. Even urban architecture looks different through a wide angle. A different lens is like having a different kind of eyes - magical eyes - to look at the world.

X-T4 is a good investment. I think this camera is so good that Fuji probably expects it to sell continuously till 2025. It is a very good camera - albeit the extra weight helps video more. I find it a bit heavy with grip added - but that is for you to decide. Personally, I prefer something lighter for single handed operation(X-T30 II looks good in my opinion. The in built flash is convenient as well.)

Strangefinder
Strangefinder Senior Member • Posts: 1,229
Assagioli Re: Burnt out on my x100f
1

selrond wrote:

A little story of mine if I might:

I bought myself x100f about 2 years ago as my first camera ever, partly because of my long-time interest in hobby photography but mainly because our kid was born, and I wanted to capture the fleeting memories for years to come.

It was an investment.

What followed was the pure joy and excitement of learning to work with the camera, learning the basics of photography, work with the scene, the moment, the light, then editing and so on. I was documenting every family gathering, almost every day of our family life, etc. I was taking x100f with me everywhere. I loved it.

But then, after a year or so, I've noticed I use it less and less. Somehow the excitement wore off, or disappeared. I also started noticing the imperfections and limitations of the lens (f/2 closeup performance...). Suddenly, I was not finding interesting scenes / subjects to shoot. The film simulation colors got boring. The focal length got boring.

In parallel to the gradual boredom with x100f, I've started to look at various other focal lengths & thus bodies as well (X-T3, X-T4). In fact, I've even started saving up for the X-T4. I'm finding it to be really exciting to look at the output of various lenses and what I'd be able to do with them (GAS?)

My concern though is this:

What if the same thing repeats and I find myself with x100f & X-T4 with a couple of lenses and a couple of thousands spent on it, not finding joy in it like it seem to be now?

And - more generally - has anybody had a similar experience to mine? Being burnt out on photography / camera, not knowing why? (It's my hobby, I'm not forced to it).

I'm not even sure I ask the right thing, just tried to summarize what's going through my head for some time now.

Thank you for any help

Plenty of good advice already.

Given that you only have the X100F, rather than having accumulated gear, I think you’re in a position to benefit from new gear more than most, however.

As others have stated, it rarely addresses the core of the problem, but this is a relative experience, and sometimes something new (whether gear, or: subject, location, philosophy, technique, project) does stimulate you. Especially, out of contrast with your present skills and habits.

On the other hand, a plateau can signal an opportunity to heighten powers:

The Act of Will, Roberto Assagioli, 1973 via https://people.brandeis.edu/~teuber/thinking.html#FNT1

I. Louis Agassiz, Naturalist and Teacher

Some of the mystery of good teaching is illuminated in the following story told by a former student of the great nineteenth century naturalist, Louis Agassiz:

The tale runs that a new student presented himself to Agassiz one day, asking to be set to work. The naturalist took a fish from a jar in which it had been preserved, and laying it before the young student, bade him observe it carefully, and be ready to report on what he had noticed about the fish. There was nothing especially interesting about that fish - it was like many other fish he had seen before. He noticed that it had fins and scales and a mouth and eyes, yes, and a tail. In a half-hour he felt certain that he had observed all about the fish that there was to be perceived. But the naturalist remained away.

Time passed and the young man having nothing else to do began to grow restless and weary. He started out to hunt up the teacher, but he failed to find him, and so he had to return and gaze again at that wearisome fish. Another hour passed and he knew little more about the fish than he did in the first place. He went out to lunch, and when he returned it was still a case of watching the fish. He felt disgusted and wished he had never come to Agassiz, who, it seemed, was a stupid old man after all. Then, in order to kill time, he began to count the scales. This completed, he counted the spines of the fins. Then he began to draw a picture of the fish. In drawing the picture he noticed that the fish had no eyelids. He thus made the discovery as his teacher had expressed it often in lectures, "a pencil is the best of eyes."

Shortly after Agassiz returned, and after ascertaining what the young man had observed, he left rather disappointed, telling him to keep on looking and maybe he would see something. This put the boy on his mettle, and he began to work with his pencil, putting down little details that had escaped him before, but which now seemed very plain to him. He began to catch the secret of observation. Little by little he brought to light objects of interest about the fish. But this did not satisfy Agassiz, who kept him at work on the same fish for three whole days. At the end of that time the student really knew something about the fish, and better than all, had acquired the "knack" and habit of careful observation . . .

Years later, the student then attained to eminence, wrote, "That was the best zoological lesson I ever had - a lesson whose influence has extended to the details of every subsequent study; a legacy that the teacher left to me, as he left to many others, of inestimable value, which we could not buy, and with which we cannot part."

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Zinch Contributing Member • Posts: 723
Re: Burnt out on my x100f
2

Leolab wrote:

I got burned-out too.

I turned to film photography as a means to rekindle my interest in photography. I found digital to be too ‘easy’ …too easy to fire away at things that are not worth taking pictures of, too easy to not think about composition and lighting (with great ability to crop and alter shadows/highlights), too easy to get lost in the technical perfection (noise and noise reduction, resolution and megapixels), too easy to always nail exposure (with incredible ISO capabilities, auto-everything including AF). I still shoot digital but i enjoy shooting film more.

When everything comes together with film (lighting, focus, composition…) you feel like you created the image vs with digital you captured the image. The film cameras themselves can sometimes be works of art or feats of enginnering and can be an absolute joy to operate as can the lenses…

I shoot B+W and develop my own at home, its actually pretty inexpensive and easy, including Medium Format.

Now i know that film is not for everyone, but IMHO its a great inexpensive way to reconnect with photography, and yes it does give a look that you cant’t easily replicate with digital…its just different.

I am not that extreme, I'd suggest trying some manual lenses. Nowadays there are a plethora of cheap chinese manual lenses with a variety of focal lengths and appertures to chose from. You don't need the newest camera, but be aware that if you buy at a good price, you won't lose a lot if you keep it in good condition.

In my case, I thought I would hate manual lenses, but nonetheless I bought a 7artisans 35mm f0.95 because it was very cheap (165€ brand new) and I wanted to try that extreme apperture. I ended loving to use it. It forces you to slow your shoting.

Sometimes while focusing I realize that the scene isn't worth it and I don't take the picture. Good! One less picture to erase when I get home.

It also reduces the keeper ratio, wich sometimes can be a good thing. When I'm playing with my son, if I take 70 pictures and all are well focused it's a pain to cull the good ones. With a manual lens with such an extreme apperture there are only a handful of focused ones lol

I know GAS is bad and all of that, but there's nothing wrong in trying new gear if you feel like you need/want it (specialy if it's not expensive). I personaly like a lot to try new focal lengths and my preferences chabge with time: at the beggining I loved the 23mm fov, but now I only use it when I can't use a tighter fov. I love the 56mm fov, but you can't use it in every situation, etc.

 Zinch's gear list:Zinch's gear list
Fujifilm X-T3 Fujifilm XF 16-80mm F4 Fujifilm XF 56mm F1.2 R Fujifilm XF 10-24mm F4 R OIS WR Voigtlander 35mm F1.2 Nokton +2 more
kamerakiri Regular Member • Posts: 379
Re: Assagioli Re: Burnt out on my x100f
1

Strangefinder wrote:

Some of the mystery of good teaching is illuminated in the following story told by a former student of the great nineteenth century naturalist, Louis Agassiz:

The tale runs that a new student presented himself to Agassiz one day, asking to be set to work. The naturalist took a fish from a jar in which it had been preserved, and laying it before the young student, bade him observe it carefully, and be ready to report on what he had noticed about the fish. There was nothing especially interesting about that fish - it was like many other fish he had seen before. He noticed that it had fins and scales and a mouth and eyes, yes, and a tail. In a half-hour he felt certain that he had observed all about the fish that there was to be perceived. But the naturalist remained away.

Time passed and the young man having nothing else to do began to grow restless and weary. He started out to hunt up the teacher, but he failed to find him, and so he had to return and gaze again at that wearisome fish. Another hour passed and he knew little more about the fish than he did in the first place. He went out to lunch, and when he returned it was still a case of watching the fish. He felt disgusted and wished he had never come to Agassiz, who, it seemed, was a stupid old man after all. Then, in order to kill time, he began to count the scales. This completed, he counted the spines of the fins. Then he began to draw a picture of the fish. In drawing the picture he noticed that the fish had no eyelids. He thus made the discovery as his teacher had expressed it often in lectures, "a pencil is the best of eyes."

Shortly after Agassiz returned, and after ascertaining what the young man had observed, he left rather disappointed, telling him to keep on looking and maybe he would see something. This put the boy on his mettle, and he began to work with his pencil, putting down little details that had escaped him before, but which now seemed very plain to him. He began to catch the secret of observation. Little by little he brought to light objects of interest about the fish. But this did not satisfy Agassiz, who kept him at work on the same fish for three whole days. At the end of that time the student really knew something about the fish, and better than all, had acquired the "knack" and habit of careful observation . . .

Years later, the student then attained to eminence, wrote, "That was the best zoological lesson I ever had - a lesson whose influence has extended to the details of every subsequent study; a legacy that the teacher left to me, as he left to many others, of inestimable value, which we could not buy, and with which we cannot part."

Beautiful lesson, thanks! 😇😇

Strangefinder
Strangefinder Senior Member • Posts: 1,229
Re: Assagioli Re: Burnt out on my x100f

kamerakiri wrote:

Strangefinder wrote:

Some of the mystery of good teaching is illuminated in the following story told by a former student of the great nineteenth century naturalist, Louis Agassiz:

Years later, the student then attained to eminence, wrote, "That was the best zoological lesson I ever had - a lesson whose influence has extended to the details of every subsequent study; a legacy that the teacher left to me, as he left to many others, of inestimable value, which we could not buy, and with which we cannot part."

Beautiful lesson, thanks! 😇😇

A good introduction to Assagioli is via his protégé, Piero Ferrucci

http://pieroferrucci.it/be.htmlWhat We May Be

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