Any love for GIMP ?

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Kumsa
Kumsa Contributing Member • Posts: 780
Any love for GIMP ?
7

It's a mystery to me that GIMP doesn't get its due attention. In combination with G'MIC, it's incredibly powerful for image manipulation. There is a long list of what it doesn't do, and a long list of what it does do. However, it's open-source, free, extremely well supported and runs on all OS platforms.

I was watching Gavin Hoey (what a personable guy) create a composite image with Photoshop and realized that everything he did was available in GIMP. In my normal workflow I rely on CaptureOne for raw edits, and then I export a TIFF into GIMP as a ProPhotoRGB. There are other open-source, free, raw editors, but I prefer CaptureOne.

What Gavin does in his walk-through is create a composite where he blends a new background into the portrait. The exact same steps work in GIMP. Photoshop is a bit pricey for many, that I'm puzzled why GIMP isn't discussed more frequently.

Take Outside Portraits Inside | Take and Make Great Photography with Gavin Hoey - YouTube

Anyone else fond of GIMP ?

https://www.gimp.org/

https://gmic.eu/

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Billiam29 Senior Member • Posts: 2,142
Re: Any love for GIMP ?

While I don’t actively "use" GIMP, I do play with it on a regular basis. My reason being that I personally want to be able to do some basic imaging work even if I don’t have Photoshop or any other paid product at my disposal.

charlyw64 Regular Member • Posts: 450
Re: Any love for GIMP ?

Most of the better compositors, image editors use PS because it is dirt cheap and it offers many things they need like support for CMYK, plug-ins and it writes the one industry standard file format with which they collaborate with their customers and fellow editors. That is a thing the sedate development of GIMP has missed and which has relegated it to the second row of also-ran... The core engine of GIMP - while a nice concept - is nigh on impossible to make run fast, so in comparison it is resource hungry beyond belief.

mangurian Contributing Member • Posts: 864
Re: Any love for GIMP ?
7

Tested it several times.  If I were dead broke, I would use it

(However, then I wouldn't have  camera or a computer, would I ?)

Tom Axford Veteran Member • Posts: 8,531
Re: Any love for GIMP ?
3

Even though I have a full licence for Photoshop, I prefer to use GIMP as the processing that I like to do is a lot easier in GIMP.  PS simply doesn't have some of the tools that GIMP has.

CAcreeks
CAcreeks Forum Pro • Posts: 17,357
Re: Any love for GIMP ?

Yes, over 15 years ago I decided I liked GIMP better than Photoshop - started faster, crashed less - and have used it ever since to edit JPEG from my own cameras and those of friends.

Noise reduction, added recently, is amazingly fast and relatively good. There used to be a Refocus filter, but no longer. Is it possible to use Topaz Sharpen AI as a GIMP plugin?

I noted today that GIMP 2.10.22 is not able to export AVIF. Do you know if 2.10.24 can?

Mika Y.
Mika Y. Senior Member • Posts: 1,829
Re: Any love for GIMP ?
2

I've used it since about the turn of the century and particularly combined with the G'MIC plugin and getting rid of the 8 bits per component limitation I'm happy with it for my hobbyist needs.

Although with the raw converters gaining more and more features (local editing, spot healing etc) I actually need it somewhat less than I used to.

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TorsteinH
TorsteinH Senior Member • Posts: 1,442
Re: Any love for GIMP ?

CAcreeks wrote:

Yes, over 15 years ago I decided I liked GIMP better than Photoshop - started faster, crashed less - and have used it ever since to edit JPEG from my own cameras and those of friends.

Noise reduction, added recently, is amazingly fast and relatively good. There used to be a Refocus filter, but no longer. Is it possible to use Topaz Sharpen AI as a GIMP plugin?

I noted today that GIMP 2.10.22 is not able to export AVIF. Do you know if 2.10.24 can?

There is an option to esporte as HEIF/AVIF if that's the same.

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Torstein

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Billiam29 Senior Member • Posts: 2,142
Re: Any love for GIMP ?

One issue I’ve noticed with GIMP over the last several years is that they occasionally convey this “open source and everything must be free, or death!” attitude. For example, I recall seeing an inquiry a few years back about whether GIMP’s Mac distribution could be code signed so that it did not have to be exempted from the macOS Gatekeeper security. The response from someone on the GIMP team was quite abrasive as if they took personal offense at the idea of paying the fee to Apple to join their developers program for this purpose.

Example number two: GIMP seems to not be able to open multi-layer TIFF files created in Photoshop. The stated reason I saw was that GIMP only supports the TIFF format as defined in its specification which supposedly only supports “pages” and not layers. Adobe supposedly doing Photoshop multi-layer TIFFs with TIFF-spec metadata, but the metadata being Adobe’s own creation. OK, fine. But PSDs are also an Adobe creation and you support those GIMP. You can’t have it both ways.

BillyBobSenna
BillyBobSenna Senior Member • Posts: 2,880
Re: Any love for GIMP ?

As Dean Wormer would say, “zero point zero”.

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CAcreeks
CAcreeks Forum Pro • Posts: 17,357
Re: Any love for GIMP ?

TorsteinH wrote:

Yes, over 15 years ago I decided I liked GIMP better than Photoshop - started faster, crashed less - and have used it ever since to edit JPEG...

I noted today that GIMP 2.10.22 is not able to export AVIF. Do you know if 2.10.24 can?

There is an option to export as HEIF/AVIF if that's the same.

Thanks, Torstein. I don't think it's quite the same, but it's similar. It's good to know that GIMP can save as HEIF although the file suffix was HEIC.

https://www.reddit.com/r/GIMP/comments/n7wjj4/is_it_possible_to_save_file_in_avif_format/

In GIMP 2.10.22, saving as "nearly lossless" made a random JPEG 3x larger, but unchecking that box made the HEIC about half the size of JPEG.

The reason I don't think AVIF == HEIC/HEIF is that Google Chrome can display AVIF, but it could not display a GIMP image saved as HEIC or HEIF. After changing the file suffix to AVIF, G.Chrome still could not display it.

P.S. Different search terms found this very helpful writeup:

https://avif.io/blog/comparisons/avif-vs-heif/

NAwlins Contrarian Veteran Member • Posts: 6,463
Formerly yes, now somewhat
4

Any love for GIMP ?

It's a mystery to me that GIMP doesn't get its due attention. In combination with G'MIC, it's incredibly powerful for image manipulation. There is a long list of what it doesn't do, and a long list of what it does do. However, it's open-source, free, extremely well supported and runs on all OS platforms.

I have been using GIMP since 2003 or 2004, I think actually version 1.x at the start. I still have and sometimes use the latest version, 2.10.24.

But GIMP has, and is not even supposed to overcome in the next major version (the forthcoming but we don't know when 3.0) the huge limitation for serious photo work that 90% of its operations are destructive--in the sense that instead of writing a set of instructions that are incorporated into the on-screen preview and stored to be incorporated into the next render-and-export, but may be modified or cancelled at any time--and actually modify the underlying pixels (in memory, not on disk unless you export over the source file). So you cannot undo or even modify them without first undoing everything you've done after them, and thereby losing all subsequent work.

And these days, with the excellent Serif Affinity Photo available for Windows and Mac OS for $55 or less, using GIMP seems more and more difficult to justify.

There are still things for which I use GIMP. I hope it overcomes its major limitations. It now handles higher-bit-depth files and operations pretty well. Its color management has improved a good bit, but still has issues.

But Affinity Photo is now my go-to pixel editor.

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Saleen1999
Saleen1999 Senior Member • Posts: 1,814
Re: Any love for GIMP ?

I have GIMP but I haven't used it alot. I need to watch some videos on YouTube to learn more about the software.

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TorsteinH
TorsteinH Senior Member • Posts: 1,442
Re: Formerly yes, now somewhat

NAwlins Contrarian wrote:

Any love for GIMP ?

It's a mystery to me that GIMP doesn't get its due attention. In combination with G'MIC, it's incredibly powerful for image manipulation. There is a long list of what it doesn't do, and a long list of what it does do. However, it's open-source, free, extremely well supported and runs on all OS platforms.

I have been using GIMP since 2003 or 2004, I think actually version 1.x at the start. I still have and sometimes use the latest version, 2.10.24.

But GIMP has, and is not even supposed to overcome in the next major version (the forthcoming but we don't know when 3.0) the huge limitation for serious photo work that 90% of its operations are destructive--in the sense that instead of writing a set of instructions that are incorporated into the on-screen preview and stored to be incorporated into the next render-and-export, but may be modified or cancelled at any time--and actually modify the underlying pixels (in memory, not on disk unless you export over the source file). So you cannot undo or even modify them without first undoing everything you've done after them, and thereby losing all subsequent work.

Just a question. I fintd it strange if Afinity works like Lightroom or DXO where every local operation you do default to a new layer? That's the only way I can understand that you can add changes without working with the underlaying pixels.

If you as an example adjust Saturation, you automatically get an adjustment layer?

And these days, with the excellent Serif Affinity Photo available for Windows and Mac OS for $55 or less, using GIMP seems more and more difficult to justify.

There are still things for which I use GIMP. I hope it overcomes its major limitations. It now handles higher-bit-depth files and operations pretty well. Its color management has improved a good bit, but still has issues.

But Affinity Photo is now my go-to pixel editor.

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Torstein

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lylejk
lylejk Forum Pro • Posts: 33,371
Just speaking with the choir to me.
2

Been using GIMP for the better part of 20 years and G'MIC for around 11 years (despite what the Wiki says, G'MIC's been around for at least 2009 or there abouts). The combo, i will say, makes GIMP more powerful than PS. Now that G'MIC's been ported into an 8bf file, PS users can get a taste of G'MIC, too. As a side note, before G'MIC, there was Greycstoration which is just a anisotrophic smoother, but a very effective one. David created that plugin, too.

edit:

Proof (and should have said 12 years apparently; lol): https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/31389806

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NAwlins Contrarian Veteran Member • Posts: 6,463
AP vs. GIMP, non-destructive issue

But GIMP has, and is not even supposed to overcome in the next major version (the forthcoming but we don't know when 3.0) the huge limitation for serious photo work that 90% of its operations are destructive--in the sense that instead of writing a set of instructions that are incorporated into the on-screen preview and stored to be incorporated into the next render-and-export, but may be modified or cancelled at any time--and actually modify the underlying pixels (in memory, not on disk unless you export over the source file). So you cannot undo or even modify them without first undoing everything you've done after them, and thereby losing all subsequent work.

Just a question. I fintd it strange if Afinity works like Lightroom or DXO where every local operation you do default to a new layer? That's the only way I can understand that you can add changes without working with the underlaying pixels.

If you as an example adjust Saturation, you automatically get an adjustment layer?

I think the terminology of "layer" is confusing. Different software and different people use it in different ways. Affinity Photo has things it calls "live filters" and "adjustment layers" (and other things). If I tell it to add a saturation adjustment--we can call it whatever--the control pops up, I set it as desired, I close the control, and then it is added to the list of controls in a panel on the screen. I can also add a mask to most and maybe all of these controls, so that they affect only a local area, or affect different areas of the image to different extents. Also, I can scroll up and down that panel and disable or modify any of those controls at any time, and I can re-enable any control I've disabled, as long as I don't actually delete it. If I save the edited image in Affinity Photo's native format, then in my next session I can go back and change, disable, re-enable, or delete any of those controls. When I export the image to a TIFF or JPEG or whatever, Affinity Photo renders all of the enabled controls into the version it is exporting.

Not all operations in Affinity Photo are totally non-destructive, and not all operations in GIMP are destructive. However, my sense from using both is that 80 - 90% of the adjustments I perform in Affinity Photo are non-destructive, and 80 - 90% of the adjustments I perform in GIMP are destructive.

And for me, that, plus the differences in color management, are strong incentives to use Affinity Photo instead of GIMP for most photo work. YMMV.

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TorsteinH
TorsteinH Senior Member • Posts: 1,442
Re: AP vs. GIMP, non-destructive issue

NAwlins Contrarian wrote:

But GIMP has, and is not even supposed to overcome in the next major version (the forthcoming but we don't know when 3.0) the huge limitation for serious photo work that 90% of its operations are destructive--in the sense that instead of writing a set of instructions that are incorporated into the on-screen preview and stored to be incorporated into the next render-and-export, but may be modified or cancelled at any time--and actually modify the underlying pixels (in memory, not on disk unless you export over the source file). So you cannot undo or even modify them without first undoing everything you've done after them, and thereby losing all subsequent work.

Just a question. I fintd it strange if Afinity works like Lightroom or DXO where every local operation you do default to a new layer? That's the only way I can understand that you can add changes without working with the underlaying pixels.

If you as an example adjust Saturation, you automatically get an adjustment layer?

I think the terminology of "layer" is confusing. Different software and different people use it in different ways. Affinity Photo has things it calls "live filters" and "adjustment layers" (and other things). If I tell it to add a saturation adjustment--we can call it whatever--the control pops up, I set it as desired, I close the control, and then it is added to the list of controls in a panel on the screen. I can also add a mask to most and maybe all of these controls, so that they affect only a local area, or affect different areas of the image to different extents. Also, I can scroll up and down that panel and disable or modify any of those controls at any time, and I can re-enable any control I've disabled, as long as I don't actually delete it. If I save the edited image in Affinity Photo's native format, then in my next session I can go back and change, disable, re-enable, or delete any of those controls. When I export the image to a TIFF or JPEG or whatever, Affinity Photo renders all of the enabled controls into the version it is exporting.

Whatever Afinity name them controls, adjustment layers etc. it's just that, layers with different propperties.

In Gimp, Photoshop, PaintShop Pro or whatever else you have to manually add a layer if you want to be able to undo your operation without undoing everything else.

Not all operations in Affinity Photo are totally non-destructive, and not all operations in GIMP are destructive. However, my sense from using both is that 80 - 90% of the adjustments I perform in Affinity Photo are non-destructive, and 80 - 90% of the adjustments I perform in GIMP are destructive.

And for me, that, plus the differences in color management, are strong incentives to use Affinity Photo instead of GIMP for most photo work. YMMV.

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Torstein

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JasonTheBirder
JasonTheBirder Senior Member • Posts: 2,314
Re: Any love for GIMP ?
2

I use the GIMP on Linux, but not very often. For photography, I don't do much serious manipulation except for removing dust spots and darktable has that covered because it has pretty decent local manipulation support. The GIMP can also be useful for making advanced HDRs with blended exposure but today's sensors are so good that I rarely need to do that when I shoot landscapes, which isn't all that often.

I make slides sometimes for videos but then I typically use Inkscape. Honestly, the GIMP just doesn't seem very relevant to photography. That being said, I don't think photoshop is either. Raw editors have come a long way.

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CAcreeks
CAcreeks Forum Pro • Posts: 17,357
Re: AP vs. GIMP, non-destructive issue
1

In normal everyday life, this doesn't matter.

Most edits I do are on overly large out-of-camera JPEG images, and I export to a smaller pixel dimension file. So the original photo remains.

I have Affinity Photo, and like it, although it seems weird after years of using Photoshop, PaintShopPro, and GIMP. There's no compelling reason to learn it because GIMP is sufficient for pixel editing. For non-destructive editing I have DxO.

GIMP is especially nice because if all you have is a JPEG, it can save at the same quality level and chroma subsampling, helping prevent re-artifacting. Also it exports WebP and HEIC. I did not notice either feature in Affinity.

CAcreeks
CAcreeks Forum Pro • Posts: 17,357
Re: Any love for GIMP ?

JasonTheBirder wrote:

I make slides sometimes for videos but then I typically use Inkscape.

Can you recommend a good tutorial for Inkscape?

Honestly, the GIMP just doesn't seem very relevant to photography.

I disagree. GIMP has many excellent features for color balancing. Auto WB and the HSV dialog are very good, as is the relatively new GEGL based noise reduction (approximately 10x as fast as Darktable).

That being said, I don't think photoshop is either. Raw editors have come a long way.

I agree. DxO PhotoLab seem faster to good results than anything. Darktable is nice but not as easy to use and with worse noise reduction.

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