Are these NOSS satellites?

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starman1969
starman1969 Veteran Member • Posts: 4,425
Are these NOSS satellites?
1

Spotted these bright streaks on an image & when I looked up I could clearly see two moving objects, which faded not long after. Couldn't check Heavens Above at the time, so I kinda guessed they might be NOSS satellites.

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Steve

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nighthiker Contributing Member • Posts: 657
Re: Are these NOSS satellites?

Hi!

Sorry, but I'm not an expert in that topic, but what about Stellarium? You can add an extra catalogue with satellites. Just put in your location and the time and see if you can identify them.

mermaidkiller Senior Member • Posts: 1,345
Re: Are these NOSS satellites?

Does this belong to 'astrophotography' ?
Artificial satellites are not astronomical objects but rather sky polluters.

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nighthiker Contributing Member • Posts: 657
Re: Are these NOSS satellites?
2

mermaidkiller wrote:

Does this belong to 'astrophotography' ?
Artificial satellites are not astronomical objects but rather sky polluters.

Is there a strict definition of 'astrophotography'?

I don't like satellites neither, but they have become - unfortunately - a reality of the night sky.

starman1969
OP starman1969 Veteran Member • Posts: 4,425
Re: Are these NOSS satellites?
7

mermaidkiller wrote:

Does this belong to 'astrophotography' ?
Artificial satellites are not astronomical objects but rather sky polluters.

Sounds a bit pedantic. First time I’ve posted on here in ages & this is what I get 🤷‍♀️

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Steve

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mermaidkiller Senior Member • Posts: 1,345
Re: Are these NOSS satellites?

nighthiker wrote:

mermaidkiller wrote:

Does this belong to 'astrophotography' ?
Artificial satellites are not astronomical objects but rather sky polluters.

Is there a strict definition of 'astrophotography'?

I don't like satellites neither, but they have become - unfortunately - a reality of the night sky.

Then we consider overflying airplanes also as part of the night sky. Or sky beamers at events.

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nighthiker Contributing Member • Posts: 657
Re: Are these NOSS satellites?
1

mermaidkiller wrote:

nighthiker wrote:

mermaidkiller wrote:

Does this belong to 'astrophotography' ?
Artificial satellites are not astronomical objects but rather sky polluters.

Is there a strict definition of 'astrophotography'?

I don't like satellites neither, but they have become - unfortunately - a reality of the night sky.

Then we consider overflying airplanes also as part of the night sky. Or sky beamers at events.

Yipp, they are all part of the night sky today (if we like it or not).

I'm just thinking of that group of ISS and satellite hunters, is that astrophotography or not? I don't mind ...

The first picture of this thread is definitely astrophotography, so this thread is correct in this forum.

W5JCK
W5JCK Veteran Member • Posts: 3,816
Re: Are these NOSS satellites?
4

mermaidkiller wrote:

nighthiker wrote:

mermaidkiller wrote:

Does this belong to 'astrophotography' ?
Artificial satellites are not astronomical objects but rather sky polluters.

Is there a strict definition of 'astrophotography'?

I don't like satellites neither, but they have become - unfortunately - a reality of the night sky.

Then we consider overflying airplanes also as part of the night sky. Or sky beamers at events.

Chill out dude! Starman has been around this forum a helluva a lot longer than you, and he has posted a large number of AP photos over the years. The world doesn’t revolve around you, nor do you get to tell us what is appropriate for this forum or not.

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mermaidkiller Senior Member • Posts: 1,345
Re: Are these NOSS satellites?

W5JCK wrote:

Chill out dude! Starman has been around this forum a helluva a lot longer than you, and he has posted a large number of AP photos over the years. The world doesn’t revolve around you, nor do you get to tell us what is appropriate for this forum or not.

That is true, there are moderators for that and I am not, but I was just wondering that pictures of non astronomical items are posted here. Nothing wrong about satellite photography when people like it, I was just wondering. That's all.

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swimswithtrout Veteran Member • Posts: 3,951
Re: Are these NOSS satellites?
1

mermaidkiller wrote:

W5JCK wrote:

Chill out dude! Starman has been around this forum a helluva a lot longer than you, and he has posted a large number of AP photos over the years. The world doesn’t revolve around you, nor do you get to tell us what is appropriate for this forum or not.

That is true, there are moderators for that and I am not, but I was just wondering that pictures of non astronomical items are posted here. Nothing wrong about satellite photography when people like it, I was just wondering. That's all.

I don't feel that "nightscapes" are astrophotography....but I don't complain about it.

swimswithtrout Veteran Member • Posts: 3,951
Re: Are these NOSS satellites?

That is certainly a good possibility. Another would be a supply ship docking/undocking from the ISS.

The one time I saw one, it was a triplet that flared to about mag -2...I definitely ran to do some research as it was the most "UFO" ufo I'd ever seen.

CharlesPhillips
CharlesPhillips Forum Member • Posts: 91
Re: Are these NOSS satellites?

starman1969 wrote:

Spotted these bright streaks on an image & when I looked up I could clearly see two moving objects, which faded not long after. Couldn't check Heavens Above at the time, so I kinda guessed they might be NOSS satellites.

I track NOSS satellites and do not understand your images. Is that two streaks going up and then two coming back down along the same path? The NOSS satellites do fly like those - B is a little in front of A.

Here are (in the top left) two verified NOSS satellites - USA 228 and the associated "debris". They are pretty dim in this photo!

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Charles
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Andy01 Veteran Member • Posts: 4,704
Re: Are these NOSS satellites?

mermaidkiller wrote:

Does this belong to 'astrophotography' ?
Artificial satellites are not astronomical objects but rather sky polluters.

Really ?

I think the OP was asking IF they were NOSS satellites, which is perfectly valid.

My interpretation was that he was not posting these images as stand-out examples of astrophotography - but perhaps I misunderstood the fairly simple question.

I would guess that his preference might be to not see these moving objects in his photos ?

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swimswithtrout Veteran Member • Posts: 3,951
Re: Are these NOSS satellites?

CharlesPhillips wrote:

starman1969 wrote:

Spotted these bright streaks on an image & when I looked up I could clearly see two moving objects, which faded not long after. Couldn't check Heavens Above at the time, so I kinda guessed they might be NOSS satellites.

I track NOSS satellites and do not understand your images. Is that two streaks going up and then two coming back down along the same path? The NOSS satellites do fly like those - B is a little in front of A.

Here are (in the top left) two verified NOSS satellites - USA 228 and the associated "debris". They are pretty dim in this photo!

They are moving in the same direction....It looks like two photos on either side of a flare, with the second taken after the peak flare as they fade away.

Bob in Baltimore
Bob in Baltimore Senior Member • Posts: 1,129
Re: Are these NOSS satellites?

starman1969 wrote:

mermaidkiller wrote:

Does this belong to 'astrophotography' ?
Artificial satellites are not astronomical objects but rather sky polluters.

Sounds a bit pedantic. First time I’ve posted on here in ages & this is what I get 🤷‍♀️

Yeah. That happens.

Steve, it's good to see you back again.

Those are interesting shots. I had never heard of the NOSS satellites and their co-orbiting nature. Given their purpose, they make sense.

At NASA we flew what is called the A-Train, a train of Earth environmental satellites all relatively close together (equator crossing times spread out by seconds to minutes). The satellites are OCO-2, GCOM-W1, Aqua, CALIPSO, CloudSat and Aura. By passing over targets close together in time they allow synergistic measurements of Earth weather by widely different sensors.

They are in Sun synchronous orbits with equator crossing times around 1:30 AM & PM. Fortunately they are in high orbits, so they can be seen from moderately high latitudes such as yours. Heavens Above shows nightly passes between 3:30  and 4:30 AM at magnitude 4 or so for the brightest. In my more mid-latitude location they are much dimmer (6th magnitude) and lower in the sky.

I wonder if anybody has captured them. NASA might like an image for their Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD).

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Bob in Baltimore

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CharlesPhillips
CharlesPhillips Forum Member • Posts: 91
Re: Are these NOSS satellites?

Bob in Baltimore wrote:

starman1969 wrote:

mermaidkiller wrote:

Does this belong to 'astrophotography' ?
Artificial satellites are not astronomical objects but rather sky polluters.

Sounds a bit pedantic. First time I’ve posted on here in ages & this is what I get 🤷‍♀️

Yeah. That happens.

Steve, it's good to see you back again.

Those are interesting shots. I had never heard of the NOSS satellites and their co-orbiting nature. Given their purpose, they make sense.

At NASA we flew what is called the A-Train, a train of Earth environmental satellites all relatively close together (equator crossing times spread out by seconds to minutes). The satellites are OCO-2, GCOM-W1, Aqua, CALIPSO, CloudSat and Aura. By passing over targets close together in time they allow synergistic measurements of Earth weather by widely different sensors.

They are in Sun synchronous orbits with equator crossing times around 1:30 AM & PM. Fortunately they are in high orbits, so they can be seen from moderately high latitudes such as yours. Heavens Above shows nightly passes between 3:30 and 4:30 AM at magnitude 4 or so for the brightest. In my more mid-latitude location they are much dimmer (6th magnitude) and lower in the sky.

I wonder if anybody has captured them. NASA might like an image for their Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD).

The amateur community doesn't track them because they are well documented in the Satellite Catalog, but I will try to get a photo or two when the weather improves here in Houston, Texas. They should be easy to photograph. I have photographed the DMSP and NOAA POES satellites (just for practice).

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Charles
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Bob in Baltimore
Bob in Baltimore Senior Member • Posts: 1,129
Re: Are these NOSS satellites?
1

CharlesPhillips wrote:

Bob in Baltimore wrote:

<snip>

I wonder if anybody has captured them. NASA might like an image for their Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD).

The amateur community doesn't track them because they are well documented in the Satellite Catalog, but I will try to get a photo or two when the weather improves here in Houston, Texas. They should be easy to photograph. I have photographed the DMSP and NOAA POES satellites (just for practice).

That would be great! I assumed that they would be hard to capture except at high latitudes due to the 1:30 AM equator crossing time. The project, if not APOD, will appreciate the shot.

The "A-Train" name is classic NASA. It is factually based, with an attached cultural reference. It is officialy called the A-train because there is a series of satellites passing overhead in he early Afternoon, like a train. The cultural reference is to Duke Ellington's great jazz piece from 1939, "Take the A-Train", which in turn refers to a subway line in New York City. The line ran from Brooklyn to Harlem.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cb2w2m1JmCY

A bit of NASA trivia and American social and cultural history. I hope it is not too far off topic.

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Bob in Baltimore

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CharlesPhillips
CharlesPhillips Forum Member • Posts: 91
Re: Are these NOSS satellites?

Bob in Baltimore wrote:

CharlesPhillips wrote:

Bob in Baltimore wrote:

<snip>

I wonder if anybody has captured them. NASA might like an image for their Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD).

The amateur community doesn't track them because they are well documented in the Satellite Catalog, but I will try to get a photo or two when the weather improves here in Houston, Texas. They should be easy to photograph. I have photographed the DMSP and NOAA POES satellites (just for practice).

That would be great! I assumed that they would be hard to capture except at high latitudes due to the 1:30 AM equator crossing time. The project, if not APOD, will appreciate the shot.

The "A-Train" name is classic NASA. It is factually based, with an attached cultural reference. It is officialy called the A-train because there is a series of satellites passing overhead in he early Afternoon, like a train. The cultural reference is to Duke Ellington's great jazz piece from 1939, "Take the A-Train", which in turn refers to a subway line in New York City. The line ran from Brooklyn to Harlem.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cb2w2m1JmCY

A bit of NASA trivia and American social and cultural history. I hope it is not too far off topic.

I just ran some predictions for them and they are visible in the early morning right now, and should be visible in the evening in Dec, Jan, Feb. They are visible in the dusk and dawn, when they are illuminated but the ground below is dark.

I made a note to get some photos and notify you.

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starman1969
OP starman1969 Veteran Member • Posts: 4,425
Re: Are these NOSS satellites?

Bob in Baltimore wrote:

starman1969 wrote:

mermaidkiller wrote:

Does this belong to 'astrophotography' ?
Artificial satellites are not astronomical objects but rather sky polluters.

Sounds a bit pedantic. First time I’ve posted on here in ages & this is what I get 🤷‍♀️

Yeah. That happens.

Steve, it's good to see you back again.

Those are interesting shots. I had never heard of the NOSS satellites and their co-orbiting nature. Given their purpose, they make sense.

At NASA we flew what is called the A-Train, a train of Earth environmental satellites all relatively close together (equator crossing times spread out by seconds to minutes). The satellites are OCO-2, GCOM-W1, Aqua, CALIPSO, CloudSat and Aura. By passing over targets close together in time they allow synergistic measurements of Earth weather by widely different sensors.

They are in Sun synchronous orbits with equator crossing times around 1:30 AM & PM. Fortunately they are in high orbits, so they can be seen from moderately high latitudes such as yours. Heavens Above shows nightly passes between 3:30 and 4:30 AM at magnitude 4 or so for the brightest. In my more mid-latitude location they are much dimmer (6th magnitude) and lower in the sky.

I wonder if anybody has captured them. NASA might like an image for their Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD).

Thanks Bob.

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Steve

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