* Wed C&C "No Theme" Thread #697 on 2021 09 01 *

Started 4 months ago | Discussions
Mike Fewster Veteran Member • Posts: 8,651
Re: Lost

Chris Oly wrote:

Sometimes titles help and sometimes they are spoilers.

In this case I think the title helps. Just enough of a clue to suggest interpretations of the image. The tree becomes a signpost that has lost its signs. Ominously, it points in the opposite direction to that faced by the woman. It is getting dark. Mist is settling in and already we can't see the horizon clearly. Now we interpret the phone as an attempt to orientate or find a path.

This is pushing things a little but there is the merest suggestion of a grave in the sand.

The alarm bells haven't gone off at this point but the shot is effectively conveying disquiet.

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Mike Fewster
Adelaide Australia

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KeesSmeele
KeesSmeele Regular Member • Posts: 366
Re: The silence of the lamp ..

LouHolland wrote:

The silence of the lamp

Lou

An example of low light photography at it's best. The barely lit candle on fills up the space on the right without distracting from the main object. A perfectly exposured picture.

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Regards,
Kees

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KeesSmeele
KeesSmeele Regular Member • Posts: 366
Re: Botanical Garden Project Part 1

minniev wrote:

This week and probably next I'll be sharing sets from a project I'm doing for our local environmental group.

In the 1970s the area where I live was just "developing" out of wilderness and less than 200 families lived out here, most having moved from a nearby big city. The ladies, perhaps bored, formed a garden club, but found the area so different that their usual projects were untenable. So they focused on creating a large botanical garden featuring native plant life, with walking trails throughout. As the ladies aged they became less able to maintain it, and now only a few are still afoot. Today's generation of women are too busy working to keep the club alive. Our non profit took it on as a project, got a grant, and by spring will have completed the cleanup/fixup/refurbishing. It will be handicapped accessible and braille certified. I'm doing the photography for the print and kiosk guides (except for the birds, who are being done by a local Audubon bird photographer). These aren't in order, but plucked from the larger set of the spring/summer grouping.

This is the main trail, about a mile long with some unpaved side trails and features to explore. It will all be smoothed for easy wheelchair access and marked for safety for the visually impaired.

The first thing the ladies planted was camellias. Unchecked for half a century they are now large trees. After their camellia phase, they decided to plant only native plants, but they left the camellias where they were.

Bill has written several books on "fernology" and led the development of the fern bog, which features every kind of native fern in central Misssissippi.

I don't know all their names but they are fun to photograph in closeup.

Wild morning glories abound in summer.

Because a creek runs through the middle of the garden we often have a light fog in the mornings that makes photos more fun. There's bird boxes like this, individually chosen for the types of birds our Audubon folks have identified as residents. The signage for the visually impaired will have bird songs and tactile images.

We wanted an outdoor classroom to encourage field trips by school groups as well as grown up groups like garden clubs, so volunteers built us one.

I've taught photography classes in the outdoor classroom. It's free to the public for anyone to use.

One of my assignments was to photograph a Devil's Walking Stick which I would have thought was an insect. After several tries, I finally found someone who knew what and where one was - ancient breed of trees with few leaves and lots of thorns.

There is a raised butterfly garden out front that is accessible for wheelchairs, so the original ladies' club members, many of whom are wheelchair bound now, can putter around with trowels if they wish.

What a nice series this is, Minniev. The images give a good impression of the work that is being done to preserve the garden. Good to see that there are still non-profits and, most of all, volunteers willing to take care of valuable nature, so everyone can enjoy it.

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Regards,
Kees

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KeesSmeele
KeesSmeele Regular Member • Posts: 366
Re: Fireworks

RoelHendrickx wrote:

I went to photograph the big fireworks at 21.00 hours over the Danube in Budapest, on Szent Istvan Nap (Saint Stephen's Day, the Hungarian national holiday).

Not surprisingly, I found the people more interesting than the pyrotechnics.

(yes, another iphone image)

To me there are tree elements that I like in this picture. probably they are already mentioned in the previous comments:

1. Obvious: the fireworks.

2. The couple in the front, representing the 'spectators' and making the composition.

3 The cell phone cult. If you didn't put it on cell phone photo or video, you haven't been there. (Sometimes I wonder whether people are watching a scene by eye or on cell phone screen)

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Regards,
Kees

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KeesSmeele
KeesSmeele Regular Member • Posts: 366
Re: National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa

19andrew47 wrote:

A single image taken with the Venus Optics Laowa 7.5 mm f/2 m4/3 lens at f/4 with the EM1ii. Processed two ways.

Andrew

done as a single image HDR file in PSP and Nik

initial processing in OW finished in PSP and Nik.

A good example of how to use (ultra) wide angle. Large figure in filling the space in the front and the complete beautiful building in the back.

The first one would be my pick. The higher contrast makes the image more dramatic, for my taste

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Regards,
Kees

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P3T3S Senior Member • Posts: 2,152
Re: Botanical Garden Project Part 1

minniev wrote:

This week and probably next I'll be sharing sets from a project I'm doing for our local environmental group.

In the 1970s the area where I live was just "developing" out of wilderness and less than 200 families lived out here, most having moved from a nearby big city. The ladies, perhaps bored, formed a garden club, but found the area so different that their usual projects were untenable. So they focused on creating a large botanical garden featuring native plant life, with walking trails throughout. As the ladies aged they became less able to maintain it, and now only a few are still afoot. Today's generation of women are too busy working to keep the club alive. Our non profit took it on as a project, got a grant, and by spring will have completed the cleanup/fixup/refurbishing. It will be handicapped accessible and braille certified. I'm doing the photography for the print and kiosk guides (except for the birds, who are being done by a local Audubon bird photographer). These aren't in order, but plucked from the larger set of the spring/summer grouping.

This is the main trail, about a mile long with some unpaved side trails and features to explore. It will all be smoothed for easy wheelchair access and marked for safety for the visually impaired.

The first thing the ladies planted was camellias. Unchecked for half a century they are now large trees. After their camellia phase, they decided to plant only native plants, but they left the camellias where they were.

Bill has written several books on "fernology" and led the development of the fern bog, which features every kind of native fern in central Misssissippi.

I don't know all their names but they are fun to photograph in closeup.

Wild morning glories abound in summer.

Because a creek runs through the middle of the garden we often have a light fog in the mornings that makes photos more fun. There's bird boxes like this, individually chosen for the types of birds our Audubon folks have identified as residents. The signage for the visually impaired will have bird songs and tactile images.

We wanted an outdoor classroom to encourage field trips by school groups as well as grown up groups like garden clubs, so volunteers built us one.

I've taught photography classes in the outdoor classroom. It's free to the public for anyone to use.

One of my assignments was to photograph a Devil's Walking Stick which I would have thought was an insect. After several tries, I finally found someone who knew what and where one was - ancient breed of trees with few leaves and lots of thorns.

There is a raised butterfly garden out front that is accessible for wheelchairs, so the original ladies' club members, many of whom are wheelchair bound now, can putter around with trowels if they wish.

This is an excellent series, in which the photos and the text complement each other so well,  awakening interest in each other, and making something even better than the two parts.

The photos themselves are not simply illustrations for the text, but well-crafted images in beautiful light.

Then there is the project itself, a very worthwhile cause, which restores and preserves and creates a place to be enjoyed by many.

Pete

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P3T3S Senior Member • Posts: 2,152
Re: Fungus

KeesSmeele wrote:

Spotted this fellow on a walk last sunday. This mushroom decided to grow right on top of a post of a gate in a fence.

The weather wasn't perfect for photography at all: grey, cloudy and a bit of drizzling rain. Still iI am pleased with the results. Moreover this is a first attempt to process the RAW image in Darktable. Itś freeware that got my interest for a while, now I have found the time to practice it. The learning curve is a steep one and I am not at the end of the curve. I still need to figure out how to denoise the background, for instance. as an first attempt, I am pleased with the result.

On miserable, grey, dreary days it is easy to give up photographically and just assume there is nothing worth pointing a camera at, so full marks for spotting this delightful little world. There is just enough light to separate the miniature world from the dark background. In fact the flat lights probably better for this than bright sunlight. The result is a great photo of a little subject.

Pete

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P3T3S Senior Member • Posts: 2,152
Re: A kitschy photo 😄

Kumsal wrote:

Kitschy? Who cares?! In any case, tastes vary so much that people disagree on what is kitsch, so I wouldn‘t worry about it.

The swans together are attractive, and making the heart is a neat touch. Sharpness is not always necessary in a photo, but this one is sharp and I think that this photo is all the better for it.

Pete

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P3T3S Senior Member • Posts: 2,152
Re: The silence of the lamp ..

LouHolland wrote:

The silence of the lamp

Lou

A Black and white with the emphasis on the black, although there seems to be a full range of greys through to white as well, thanks to the great lighting and exposure.

It has a very mysterious atmosphere, not least due to the blacks. The shapes suggest things and leave the rest to the imagination, such as the lamp stand suggesting the back of a human head.

The almost invisible items on the right, which are revealed by the tiniest highlights, are very cool. Their presence adds another secretive layer to think about.

I enjoyed this fine image.

Pete

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P3T3S Senior Member • Posts: 2,152
Re: National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa

19andrew47 wrote:

A single image taken with the Venus Optics Laowa 7.5 mm f/2 m4/3 lens at f/4 with the EM1ii. Processed two ways.

Andrew

done as a single image HDR file in PSP and Nik

initial processing in OW finished in PSP and Nik.

I prefer the colour and contrast of the first version.

I like the way the spider dominates the building, and it’s long legs find echoes in the pillars of the building, and, at a stretch, the spider´s web seen in the window frames.

Pete

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P3T3S Senior Member • Posts: 2,152
Re: BIF. I have much to learn.

Mike Fewster wrote:

Posted because it's on my mind. The shot was taken yesterday as we were driving to central Australia. At one spot there were clouds of budgerigars. We stopped and I headed into the bush to try to get BIF. Tried for about an hour. Crawled under fences looking for a good vantage point. Chopped up by prickles. Experimented with many different settings. Those birds move very fast and very erratically.

Here is my best shot and it isn't good.

Conclusion. I have much to learn and if I was to get serious about this, Some different gear would help but mainly, this is my learning curve to be climbed.

Welcome to the club of novice birds in flight photographers!

It is good fun and rewarding when the photos are successful, although the bar for success is very low initially. You have already received good advice, but here are a couple more obscure  ones, albeit from my Olympus,which is famous for having millions of user settings, and long menus to cater for that.

- check that priority is given to AF rather than shutter release. The shutter will only fire if AF confirms the image is sharp, rather than allowing shutter to fire at max frequency regardless of sharpness.

- check for focus limiting. This is a great feature, both in camera and on some lenses for Olympus, if you can guess distance of birds and the distracting background or foreground is not too close.  It can also be annoying if you guess the birds distance badly and they are not in selected range, or if you try aiming at birds at different distances and forget to change the limits.

- with continuous AF, there is a max frame/sec limit for which the camera refocuses before each shot. If over that limit, camera focuses before first frame and does not change for any subsequent shots in the sequence.

- slow, gliding birds of prey are bigger, slower and easier to photograph than the tiny, nervous, fast moving birds.

With this shot, the birds are nicely separated from the blurred background, and the light is nice too. I think it is good that the flock is flying into the frame, rather than filling the entire frame with a mass of birds.

Pete

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P3T3S Senior Member • Posts: 2,152
Re: Lost

Chris Oly wrote:

“Lost” is a great title. Had you called it something like “Poor Beach Weather”, the viewer would probably just agree and move on. “Lost” invites the viewer to think about the image and find the clues, which others have already described. I like the fact that it remains a dull image, and has not been brightened to an “optimal “ exposure. This adds to the atmosphere and the theme of being lost.

It is an intriguing photo.

Pete

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P3T3S Senior Member • Posts: 2,152
Group reply

I was thinking that the phrase “searching for Lizards “ would have a different meaning to a modern school child than when I was that age. No longer looking in the grass around suitably sunny rocks, but involving smart phones and search engines. On top of that, even if they found the successful hunting grounds of my youth, the chances are the rocks would be bare, due to environmental challenges, or would be buried in the foundations of new building projects. 
The photo was supposed to illustrate that, and using the image found on the phone to repopulate the habitat. It was not supposed to create an illusion.

In fact the lizard was photographed in Cuba with the E-M1 andthe photo sent to my phone with the Olympus Share app. I laid the phone on some grass at home and rephotographed it. Despite the ridiculous F16, it was also taken with the E-M1!

Pete

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