Mac or PC

Started 4 months ago | Discussions
raylinds Forum Member • Posts: 77
Re: Mac or PC

I have always used PC and have several powerful high end desktops and a few nice laptops.

I wanted a computer dedicated solely to photo processing. After much research I went with an iMac 24" with 16G RAM. The SSD is only 256G, but I got a high speed IG Thunderbolt outboard SSD for $150. The screen is amazing.

The important thing is that all my photo software is available for Mac. YMMV

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OP grcolts Veteran Member • Posts: 3,658
Re: Mac or PC

raylinds wrote:

I have always used PC and have several powerful high end desktops and a few nice laptops.

I wanted a computer dedicated solely to photo processing. After much research I went with an iMac 24" with 16G RAM. The SSD is only 256G, but I got a high speed IG Thunderbolt outboard SSD for $150. The screen is amazing.

The important thing is that all my photo software is available for Mac. YMMV

The software I use except for Affinity Photo will not work natively with the m 1 chip at this point in time. Hopefully, sooner than later others will correct this problem. I don't want to use Rosetta as it is too intensive on resources. The reason for going with a m 1 mac is for being able to run it's native os.  Right now I could use more of my software with Windows than the mac. I feel better about the m 1 macs surviving 4-6 years after doing a lot of reading. Many thanks for your input.

OP grcolts Veteran Member • Posts: 3,658
Re: Mac or PC

Philip Eihuyar wrote:

Nixvis wrote:

I am a software developer, so I prefer a Windows PC for work, which I can always upgrade to fit my needs. I use the MacBook as a portable machine, on which it is easy to solve work issues on the road and also edit photos and videos. Many developers prefer Windows or Linux PCs for a number of objective reasons. This is especially true for the sphere of IoT sirinsoftware.com/services/iot-development The new MacBook based on the M1 processor is good, but too little software is optimized for it.

The OP does not fit into your profession of a software developer.

"Well, I was prepared to purchase a new m1 Mac or mini mac m1 as my older iMac is showing its age at 11 years. Then, after researching the new m1 macs I see that they basically cannot be upgraded or for the most part repaired after purchase. One has to either get a new circuit board or purchase a new unit. So, I started researching some PC's and see that I can get a more powerful computer for less money that is repairable/upgradable Most of the software I am currently using would be usable on Windows as well. My question is this: anyone jumped from using Mac's to PC's? I mainly use my computer for photo editing and internet use. Would love to hear your experiences both pros and cons."

But, it does bring up questions of the differences of an M1 Mac or a Linux PC for your -software designer- use. Are the limitations of the M1 Mac Just a lack of software? if the software were available and optimized for a M1 Mac, what would be different?

It's funny that more of my software would work with Windows than on the new M 1 macs. I know programs are being rewritten to work with the m 1 but right now only one of my photo softwares will work natively. I know Rosetta is available but I prefer not to use it as it is hard on your computer resources. I do feel better about the ssd drives surviving 3-6 years after doing much reading. It is a tough decision. I love my old Mac but still not sure about the new m 1 units. Need to sleep on it more. Thanks for your input as it is appreciated.

OP grcolts Veteran Member • Posts: 3,658
Re: Mac or PC

Nixvis wrote:

I am a software developer, so I prefer a Windows PC for work, which I can always upgrade to fit my needs. I use the MacBook as a portable machine, on which it is easy to solve work issues on the road and also edit photos and videos. Many developers prefer Windows or Linux PCs for a number of objective reasons. This is especially true for the sphere of IoT sirinsoftware.com/services/iot-development The new MacBook based on the M1 processor is good, but too little software is optimized for it.

Right now software is lacking. As I mentioned in another post most of the software I use on my older Mac will not run on the new m 1 without using Rosetta. I really don't want to use that software as it is very hard on your computers resources. Plus, I want to run native software if I go the Mac route. There are some very good Window options out there that can currently run most of the software I use now. So, a tough decision. Maybe I am over analyzing the whole thing.  Thanks for your input.

joger
joger Veteran Member • Posts: 7,132
M1(X) has much better software support compared to any other platform
1

grcolts wrote:

Right now software is lacking.

Which software is lacking on a MAC? You can also run a VM with the few exceptions you might need - I do that for the business software that is really bad - rund only in a very high specific environment - I have two VMs with the exact configuration for each task. Very annoying and a clear sing about the lack of quality on windows.

As I mentioned in another post most of the software I use on my older Mac will not run on the new m 1 without using Rosetta.

Which software would that be? Could you post a list? I've analyzed the software I am using and most is already fully compatible with the new ARM setup - I'd say something like >80 %

I really don't want to use that software as it is very hard on your computers resources.

Why? It's a computer - who cares how the machine does certain tasks - which resources are blocked for other stuff you'd like to do?

The new Roestta is significantly better than the old one with PPC code and it is foreseeable that the good tools will all switch to ARM. I've had the maxed our M1 MBA for a week and it felt faster than my iMac PRO with 10 C and 64 GB

In my case video, image processing and audio is all natively running on macOS with ARM

Plus, I want to run native software if I go the Mac route.

Yes - all large software companies will adapt their tools over time - just a question of months and with cloud computing a lot of stuff can run in a browser window virtually.

Storage is anyway on a NAS or the cloud since that's more scalable and you can get rid of the humming noise in your workspace. In my case one NAS with 144 and one NAS with 80 TB of HDD space for all video and imaging work i own - would be hard to build that locally.

There are some very good Window options out there that can currently run most of the software I use now.

There is not a single Windows machine I'd like to own 🤣

the technology built in in windows is not as refined and polished as the MACs I've owned over the years. Mostly grey boxes or lately with blinking LEDs for the kids.

The GUI is horrible and I hardly find anything where it should be - on the MAC I can do everything without problems and I work daily 8..10 h on windows and hate it.

So, a tough decision. Maybe I am over analyzing the whole thing. Thanks for your input.

Yes - it seems like - maybe a question of resources - for me € 8..10 k for a computer over 4..5 years are a minor investment - let alone a machine of € 3..4 k.

I bought a maxed out 13.3" MBP last summer for € 4 ½ k and I am willing to buy a maxed out 14" MBP with miniLED for probably € 6 ½ k this autumn. The 2020 MBP can be sold for a good return of investment and the new one will bring so many aspects I want to have:

  • much longer battery life ( = good for travel usage )
  • better display ( even outdoors for tethered shootings )
  • larger display without increasing the over all size too much
  • much better performance with less fan usage
  • better software support

I buy things with a perspective to work with them for the coming years not to have the same that I used to have in the past.

Software support on Intel will be dramatically worse on any platform in the future. On MACs you can also run natively APPs designed for the iPad or the iPhone and that opens a whole new territory of applications plus the naively running software on MACs and the good selection of Intel based code plus Windows vial VMs. I hardly know any other platform that's that versatile.

For me a no-brainer to get at day one the maxed out 14" MBP at any price 😅

I am hoping for:

  • 14" miniLED display ( that's a must have - without that technology it's a no-go )
  • >= 32 GB RAM ( might be enough for the new architecture )
  • >= 4 TB storage
  • 8 performance and 2 efficiency cores
  • 32 GPU cores
  • slimmer, lighter and more durable
  • magsafe connector for power
  • >3 ports with TB 3 and USB 4
  • WiFi 6
  • space grey design

I hope this will be available in 2021 still and I'll be able to sell my existing MBP before Xmas with 1 ½ years of warranty for the new owner.

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silentstorm Senior Member • Posts: 1,482
Totally agree

Nixvis wrote:

I am a software developer, so I prefer a Windows PC for work, which I can always upgrade to fit my needs. I use the MacBook as a portable machine, on which it is easy to solve work issues on the road and also edit photos and videos. Many developers prefer Windows or Linux PCs for a number of objective reasons. This is especially true for the sphere of IoT sirinsoftware.com/services/iot-development The new MacBook based on the M1 processor is good, but too little software is optimized for it.

OP needs to sought this one out himself/herself.  People buy the machines for the software they use.  I don't know of many companies with macs running CNC machines or laser cutters.  I also don't know of many companies that use mac pro as data centers.

I also highlighted the costs of software over at the PC Talk forum too.  Mac software tends to get obsoleted really quickly and repurchase of the same software is needed.

But I see many pro mac replies here are based mainly on their personal subjective emotions.

Like you, I too use both platforms.  Some things irks me on mac, like why can't I configure the power button as 1-step shut down w/o the confirmation dialogue?  Why can't I close the app using the "x" icon, but must use command+q?  Interfaces like this many consider as very user friendly and love it.  I can respect that, no problem.  Everyone is different.

terrydev Regular Member • Posts: 410
Re: Mac or PC
1

most of the software I use on my older Mac will not run on the new m 1 without using Rosetta. I really don't want to use that software as it is very hard on your computers resources.

I can assure that is not the case. It downloads the first time you need it and thereafter it is quite invisible to the user. It makes no significant demands on the resources of the Mac.

terrydev Regular Member • Posts: 410
Re: Totally agree
1

Mac software tends to get obsoleted really quickly and repurchase of the same software is needed.

Really? can you give us some examples?

Why can't I close the app using the "x" icon, but must use command+q?

This is really simple. If the app cannot do anything without a window then it quits when you click the red button on the window. So, SystemPreferences, for instance, click on the red button and it quits. If, however, the app has functions without a window - say a word processor - it continues to run without a window, awaiting your command to open or create a document. What puzzles me is why Windows assumes that if I close a document that I am finished with the application...

silentstorm Senior Member • Posts: 1,482
Re: Mac or PC

grcolts wrote:

Right now I could use more of my software with Windows than the mac. I feel better about the m 1 macs surviving 4-6 years after doing a lot of reading. Many thanks for your input.

You don't know that!  The M1 is too new, how do you know the new mac you buy today will survive 4 yrs?  What if there's a flaw in the chip that will kill the computer after 2 half yrs?  Like those gpu that has solder cracks inside the chip incidents.

You are right, there are more software for windows than there are for macs.  But is this important?  Nope.  What is important is, what are you using for yourself.  Just like photography, if you shoot street, landscape and macro, you will not be buying a 600mm lens.  So why go for a brand that sells more variety of FL lenses?  Buy what is necessary for yourself will do.

silentstorm Senior Member • Posts: 1,482
Re: Totally agree

terrydev wrote:

Mac software tends to get obsoleted really quickly and repurchase of the same software is needed.

Really? can you give us some examples?

Why can't I close the app using the "x" icon, but must use command+q?

This is really simple. If the app cannot do anything without a window then it quits when you click the red button on the window. So, SystemPreferences, for instance, click on the red button and it quits. If, however, the app has functions without a window - say a word processor - it continues to run without a window, awaiting your command to open or create a document. What puzzles me is why Windows assumes that if I close a document that I am finished with the application...

How about you list me software that can still run on Big Sur from Snow Leopard? OP did mentioned his was 11 yrs ago.

For discussion sake, let's say OP has Adobe Master Collection CS6 and is buggy on last Hi Sierra OS. Can he still install this on Big Sur (on a new mac)? CS6 costs hundreds of dollars.

Understanding why the need for command-q is not the same as accepting it as a friendly feature. What about that power button shut down config? You seems to know a lot about mac OS. Please do share (I do sincerely mean it). Thanks.

terrydev Regular Member • Posts: 410
Re: Totally agree
1

How about you list me software that can still run on Big Sur from Snow Leopard? OP did mentioned his was 11 yrs ago.

Off the top of my head: FCP, Motion are a couple right there. And no re-purchasing needed. Wasn't around about then Adobe adopted subscription? If you signed up then those apps would be running too.

For discussion sake, let's say OP has Adobe Master Collection CS6 and is buggy on last Hi Sierra OS. Can he still install this on Big Sur (on a new mac)? CS6 costs hundreds of dollars.

And why not find an extreme example? But I did a quick google about the place and note that MS say that CS6 is not compatible with Windows 10, and over on the Adobe forums they're trying to figure out hacks that might allow it to be installed on W10.

Understanding why the need for command-q is not the same as accepting it as a friendly feature.

It's perfectly friendly. You're the one who finds the feature unfriendly as you cannot grasp the difference between an application and a document. It's always going to be difficult for you until you do.

What about that power button shut down config?

Do nothing and it will carry out the instruction in 60 seconds itself. A simple failsafe against accidentally triggering it. But really? If this is what makes you think Windows is better? Then for you, it is. I wonder if I could find any puzzling hoops that I have to leap through to accomplish things on Windows that seem more simple on a Mac? I bet we could find one or two.

Mike Boreham Senior Member • Posts: 1,671
Re: Mac or PC
1

grcolts wrote:-

Right now software is lacking. As I mentioned in another post most of the software I use on my older Mac will not run on the new m 1 without using Rosetta. I really don't want to use that software as it is very hard on your computers resources.

You have mentioned this twice. Most people seem very pleasantly surprised by the opposite, including me. Where are you reading this about Rosetta? Thanks.

This article says some apps may run faster under Rosetta in M1 than on Intel! (Doesn't say what Intel but the point is Rosetta 2 is not original 2006 Rosetta).

Phillip Forsten Senior Member • Posts: 1,253
Re: Totally agree

silentstorm wrote:

terrydev wrote:

Mac software tends to get obsoleted really quickly and repurchase of the same software is needed.

Really? can you give us some examples?

Why can't I close the app using the "x" icon, but must use command+q?

This is really simple. If the app cannot do anything without a window then it quits when you click the red button on the window. So, SystemPreferences, for instance, click on the red button and it quits. If, however, the app has functions without a window - say a word processor - it continues to run without a window, awaiting your command to open or create a document. What puzzles me is why Windows assumes that if I close a document that I am finished with the application...

How about you list me software that can still run on Big Sur from Snow Leopard? OP did mentioned his was 11 yrs ago.

For discussion sake, let's say OP has Adobe Master Collection CS6 and is buggy on last Hi Sierra OS. Can he still install this on Big Sur (on a new mac)? CS6 costs hundreds of dollars.

Understanding why the need for command-q is not the same as accepting it as a friendly feature. What about that power button shut down config? You seems to know a lot about mac OS. Please do share (I do sincerely mean it). Thanks.

I use Photoshop CS6 on Mojave and I have never run into even one issue. Using LR6 as well. Adobe gets no rent from me. 😄

silentstorm Senior Member • Posts: 1,482
Re: Totally agree

terrydev wrote:

How about you list me software that can still run on Big Sur from Snow Leopard? OP did mentioned his was 11 yrs ago.

Off the top of my head: FCP, Motion are a couple right there. And no re-purchasing needed. Wasn't around about then Adobe adopted subscription? If you signed up then those apps would be running too.

Genuine question since I have FCS 3. How do you even install FCP & Motion on Hi Sierra, not even going to Big Sur that we're talking about here. If you have a link to a hack, I would love to know!

From my experience, DVD Studio, Soundtrack Pro, Motion, Compressor & Q-Master has stopped working by Sierra. FCP7 is buggy even on El Cap but still ok for simple work.

For discussion sake, let's say OP has Adobe Master Collection CS6 and is buggy on last Hi Sierra OS. Can he still install this on Big Sur (on a new mac)? CS6 costs hundreds of dollars.

And why not find an extreme example? But I did a quick google about the place and note that MS say that CS6 is not compatible with Windows 10, and over on the Adobe forums they're trying to figure out hacks that might allow it to be installed on W10.

How is it extreme? FCP & Motion that you mentioned are even older. CS6 was from 2012. And I have both win and mac 64bit version and I could install on win10 direct. The whole suite runs fine. But I must admit it is not comfortable working on hi-rez screens cos the CS6 suite doesn't do scaling, menus' text are super tiny. Other then that, no biggy.

Understanding why the need for command-q is not the same as accepting it as a friendly feature.

It's perfectly friendly. You're the one who finds the feature unfriendly as you cannot grasp the difference between an application and a document. It's always going to be difficult for you until you do.

Actually many people do. Do a search and you'll be surprised. Anyway, to each his own, I'm not trying to convince or convert anyone here to be like me. Just replying to Nixvis on what irks me. Nothing more.

What about that power button shut down config?

Do nothing and it will carry out the instruction in 60 seconds itself. A simple failsafe against accidentally triggering it. But really? If this is what makes you think Windows is better? Then for you, it is. I wonder if I could find any puzzling hoops that I have to leap through to accomplish things on Windows that seem more simple on a Mac? I bet we could find one or two.

So for that 60s, are you going to see there and wait? If not then you risk someone hijacking your station within 60s and do funny things on your terminal.

But really? Which part of my replies did I say windows is better? I thought I mentioned I used both platforms.

silentstorm Senior Member • Posts: 1,482
Re: Totally agree

Phillip Forsten wrote:

silentstorm wrote:

terrydev wrote:

Mac software tends to get obsoleted really quickly and repurchase of the same software is needed.

Really? can you give us some examples?

Why can't I close the app using the "x" icon, but must use command+q?

This is really simple. If the app cannot do anything without a window then it quits when you click the red button on the window. So, SystemPreferences, for instance, click on the red button and it quits. If, however, the app has functions without a window - say a word processor - it continues to run without a window, awaiting your command to open or create a document. What puzzles me is why Windows assumes that if I close a document that I am finished with the application...

How about you list me software that can still run on Big Sur from Snow Leopard? OP did mentioned his was 11 yrs ago.

For discussion sake, let's say OP has Adobe Master Collection CS6 and is buggy on last Hi Sierra OS. Can he still install this on Big Sur (on a new mac)? CS6 costs hundreds of dollars.

Understanding why the need for command-q is not the same as accepting it as a friendly feature. What about that power button shut down config? You seems to know a lot about mac OS. Please do share (I do sincerely mean it). Thanks.

I use Photoshop CS6 on Mojave and I have never run into even one issue. Using LR6 as well. Adobe gets no rent from me. 😄

Phillip, I hope you could be more precise with your answer.  I was referring to CS6 the whole Master collection suite, not photoshop alone.  And also install on Big Sur, not Mojave.

Anyway, how's After Effects CS6 running on Mojave?  "Oh I don't use AE so I don't care" is this going to be your reply?

Same here, Adobe gets no rent from me.  Hanging on to older software or totally using another brand.  Hahahaha.

silentstorm Senior Member • Posts: 1,482
Question for grcolts

Do you use Capture One Pro? If you do, can the version you bought in 2017 run on Big Sur (new mac)? Or do you need to repurchase?

The website says not supported but sometimes you can still run it.

https://support.captureone.com/hc/en-us/articles/360002406498-Which-version-of-Capture-One-will-work-on-my-Apple-operating-system-

Only you can answer which platform you want to move on with.  Buy with no regrets!

raylinds Forum Member • Posts: 77
Re: Mac or PC

My perspective as one who ran PCs for years and now an iMac is that either machine can be used effectively for photo editing, and it is all about what software one wishes to use.  But I will say that one should be willing to explore the latest applications available before making a decision.

I just got back into digital after a number of years away.  I loved Lightroom, but hardly ever needed the kind of manipulation that required Photoshop.  I got DxO Photolab mainly to correct for lens aberrations, but did 99% of my work in LR.

When I got back into it, I did not want to get into a subscription plan, so started using Photolab as my main tool for RAW processing.  It is working great for me, but I am not a working pro with a huge number of images to deal with and organize so don't really care about LR's more advanced librarian functions.  YMMV

I do think the ability to upgrade is a huge plus for PCs, but I have not yet run into resource limitations on my Mac.

The good news is that you cannot go wrong either way IMHO.

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CAcreeks
CAcreeks Forum Pro • Posts: 17,342
Re: Mac or PC
1

Mike Boreham wrote:

grcolts wrote:-

Right now software is lacking. As I mentioned in another post most of the software I use on my older Mac will not run on the new m 1 without using Rosetta. I really don't want to use that software as it is very hard on your computer's resources.

You have mentioned this twice. Most people seem very pleasantly surprised by the opposite, including me. Where are you reading this about Rosetta? Thanks.

Legacy application Topaz JPEG to Raw did not work on my M1 Macbook, but Topaz Sharpen AI and Gigapixel AI do (latest versions).

One Firefox plug-in did not work until summertime, but does now. Other than that, I haven't had any problems with Rosetta. DxO PhotoLab runs great, as does GIMP.

This article says some apps may run faster under Rosetta in M1 than on Intel! (Doesn't say what Intel but the point is Rosetta 2 is not original 2006 Rosetta).

Lightroom and Capture One are available native M1, but I don't use either.

Phillip Forsten Senior Member • Posts: 1,253
Re: Totally agree

silentstorm wrote:

Phillip Forsten wrote:

silentstorm wrote:

terrydev wrote:

Mac software tends to get obsoleted really quickly and repurchase of the same software is needed.

Really? can you give us some examples?

Why can't I close the app using the "x" icon, but must use command+q?

This is really simple. If the app cannot do anything without a window then it quits when you click the red button on the window. So, SystemPreferences, for instance, click on the red button and it quits. If, however, the app has functions without a window - say a word processor - it continues to run without a window, awaiting your command to open or create a document. What puzzles me is why Windows assumes that if I close a document that I am finished with the application...

How about you list me software that can still run on Big Sur from Snow Leopard? OP did mentioned his was 11 yrs ago.

For discussion sake, let's say OP has Adobe Master Collection CS6 and is buggy on last Hi Sierra OS. Can he still install this on Big Sur (on a new mac)? CS6 costs hundreds of dollars.

Understanding why the need for command-q is not the same as accepting it as a friendly feature. What about that power button shut down config? You seems to know a lot about mac OS. Please do share (I do sincerely mean it). Thanks.

I use Photoshop CS6 on Mojave and I have never run into even one issue. Using LR6 as well. Adobe gets no rent from me. 😄

Phillip, I hope you could be more precise with your answer. I was referring to CS6 the whole Master collection suite, not photoshop alone. And also install on Big Sur, not Mojave.

Saying Photoshop and that I run it without any issue on Mojave is being "precise". I also know what you said. I was just adding to what you said.

Anyway, how's After Effects CS6 running on Mojave? "Oh I don't use AE so I don't care" is this going to be your reply?

What makes you think I run that particular software based on what I said?

Same here, Adobe gets no rent from me. Hanging on to older software or totally using another brand. Hahahaha.

Yes, it is easy to do that, especially if use a dedicated computer running a supported OS, since eventually an OS update will permanently break the old app's compatibility. Unfortunately people are easily convinced that they need never ending updates and new software and hardware altogether.

In my case I am running LR6 and photoshop CS6 on a full spec late 2012 iMac that I have upgraded to include a 1TB SSD and an 8TB HDD, both internally. This is the last year for official OS support from Apple for my almost 9 year old iMac. This fall it will be taken offline, for security, but it will remain as my photo editing computer. I have never owned a more reliable computer, and both apps essentially handle all my photo editing in real time. Its as fast as it ever was on Mojave. In fact it is significantly faster with the drive upgrades I did.

Ubele New Member • Posts: 23
Re: Mac or PC
2

Teila Day wrote:

I use Canon scanners, I can't just plug one into my macs and start scanning without a work-around (I'm generally not into work-arounds). But I can with PC, because that's what the drivers are written for. So having both platforms at arms reach works for me.

I was upset when my perfectly good 2007 Canon 8800F scanner stopped working with one of the new versions of macOS a few years ago. Then I found a program called VueScan that claimed to work with pretty much all no-longer-supported-on-the-Mac scanners. At $99, it seemed a bit pricey, but it works as advertised, and the developer keeps it updated. In any case, it was cheaper than buying a new scanner.

As for the OP's questions, I've been using Macs and Windows PCs since the 1980s -- mostly Macs at home and PCs at work. For a long time, my favorite Mac was my 2000 G4 PowerMac. I got eight years out of it, upgrading every component that could be upgraded. When it became too slow for my needs, I gave it to my dad, who got two more years out of it before it finally died. Like many Mac users, I kept holding out for the "affordable mid-range tower" that never came. Then someone pointed out that I'd spent as much money on upgraded components as I would have if I'd sold my Macs and bought new ones every two or three years.

As others have pointed out here, there isn't as much reason to upgrade components as there used to be, because the useful lifespan of Macs is so long. I got four good years out of my 2008 MacBook Pro, which was typical at the time. My 2015 13" MBP still feels as fast as the day I got it, with the exception of Luminar, which isn't happy with 8 GB of RAM. Heck, my late 2012 i7 Mac mini with 16 GB of RAM still works fine with all my apps. Yes, I replaced the stock HDD with a Fusion drive, but I could have used a bootable external SSD instead. The only reason I relegated it to a backup computer was because I bought a 2019 27" iMac, and of course the 2012 mini doesn't support Big Sur.

II confess that I considered switching to a Windows PC in 2018, when many people felt that Apple had all but given up on Macs in favor of iPhones and iPads. Most of their Mac line had old hardware and high prices. Then Apple updated many of their Macs and dropped the price by several hundred dollars, which was when I purchased my 2019 iMac. I expect it to be useful for many years to come. I'll probably replace my 2015 MBP with an Mx MBP or Air when it no longer supports the latest macOS. 1 TB of internal storage has been enough for me for several years, and I don't expect that to change. I'll get more than whatever the base-level amount of RAM is at the time. In short, I no longer worry about upgradability the way I used to. As for repairability, the only Mac I've ever needed to have repaired was my 2008 MBP, which had the faulty NVIDIA graphic adapter.

It sounds like the OP is looking for reasons to switch to a Windows PC, which is fine. This is just my opinion, but none of their stated reasons seem like compelling reasons to switch. Other posters have addressed those concerns. I don't dislike Windows 10, and when I'm in a cross-platform app (e.g., any of the Adobe apps), I can't tell the difference. I can't speak to whether Windows is harder to maintain than macOS, because my company's IT department handles the Windows maintenance. But I'm invested in the Apple ecosystem, I find macOS more elegant than Windows (subjective, I know), Apple offers products across a wide price range (they no longer subjectively seem "overpriced," as they once did), there's software available for everything I do, I'd miss Logic Pro if I switched, and I'm familiar with the Apple environment. Apple would have to do something really egregious to get me to switch to Windows.

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