Mounting a DSLR on top of another.

Started 3 months ago | Questions
WongRQ Contributing Member • Posts: 558
Mounting a DSLR on top of another.

Hi everyone,

MultiCam productions are useful in case you want to jump between them each cut but they require you to carry another tripod around so why not just have an articulating arm on top of the hot shoe and mount another DSLR on the other end (use adapters if needed)

Is it dangerous though? Will the camera just break into pieces after long hours or are they tough enough?

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Mark Scott Abeln
Mark Scott Abeln Forum Pro • Posts: 17,691
Re: Mounting a DSLR on top of another.
9

WongRQ wrote:

Is it dangerous though? Will the camera just break into pieces after long hours or are they tough enough?

Your camera's hot shoe will quickly break.

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j3ffw
j3ffw Regular Member • Posts: 246
Re: Mounting a DSLR on top of another.
3

I don't understand your solution.  The benefit of a multi-cam production is to have different angles so you can keep the viewer interested, add other information to the story visually, give different perspectives to the same scene.

Why would you want to have a camera on top of another when you could just use a proper motion camera that continues recording for how ever long you need?  Even if you wanted to shoot at different frame rates wouldn't you want to take advantage of adding in a different perspective.

If I'm missing something and you really want to do this I would suggest placing a cage on the bottom camera and mounting the second to the cage not the hot shoe

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Supisiche Senior Member • Posts: 1,077
Re: Mounting a DSLR on top of another.

I want to see a DDLR camera. 2 lenses, 2 sensors

Mika Y.
Mika Y. Senior Member • Posts: 1,796
Re: Mounting a DSLR on top of another.

WongRQ wrote:

Hi everyone,

MultiCam productions are useful in case you want to jump between them each cut but they require you to carry another tripod around so why not just have an articulating arm on top of the hot shoe and mount another DSLR on the other end (use adapters if needed)

Is it dangerous though? Will the camera just break into pieces after long hours or are they tough enough?

I doubt any consumer camera products have hot shoes that are engineered for the kind of stresses using this kind of set up would create. So my guess it that it might work temporarily, but sooner or later the hot shoe would break or bend enough to no longer work reliably.

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OP WongRQ Contributing Member • Posts: 558
Re: Mounting a DSLR on top of another.

Mika Y. wrote:

WongRQ wrote:

Hi everyone,

MultiCam productions are useful in case you want to jump between them each cut but they require you to carry another tripod around so why not just have an articulating arm on top of the hot shoe and mount another DSLR on the other end (use adapters if needed)

Is it dangerous though? Will the camera just break into pieces after long hours or are they tough enough?

I doubt any consumer camera products have hot shoes that are engineered for the kind of stresses using this kind of set up would create. So my guess it that it might work temporarily, but sooner or later the hot shoe would break or bend enough to no longer work reliably.

I don’t mean hanging the camera. It’s camera, hot shoe side on top, 3/8” -16 gets directed to a head and another camera gets attached below

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Mark B.
Mark B. Forum Pro • Posts: 28,299
Re: Mounting a DSLR on top of another.

WongRQ wrote:

Mika Y. wrote:

WongRQ wrote:

Hi everyone,

MultiCam productions are useful in case you want to jump between them each cut but they require you to carry another tripod around so why not just have an articulating arm on top of the hot shoe and mount another DSLR on the other end (use adapters if needed)

Is it dangerous though? Will the camera just break into pieces after long hours or are they tough enough?

I doubt any consumer camera products have hot shoes that are engineered for the kind of stresses using this kind of set up would create. So my guess it that it might work temporarily, but sooner or later the hot shoe would break or bend enough to no longer work reliably.

I don’t mean hanging the camera. It’s camera, hot shoe side on top, 3/8” -16 gets directed to a head and another camera gets attached below

I wouldn't attach anything heavier than an external shoe-mount flash to the hotshoe.  Anything else is a repair bill.

robgendreau Veteran Member • Posts: 8,925
Re: Mounting a DSLR on top of another.
1

WongRQ wrote:

Mika Y. wrote:

WongRQ wrote:

Hi everyone,

MultiCam productions are useful in case you want to jump between them each cut but they require you to carry another tripod around so why not just have an articulating arm on top of the hot shoe and mount another DSLR on the other end (use adapters if needed)

Is it dangerous though? Will the camera just break into pieces after long hours or are they tough enough?

I doubt any consumer camera products have hot shoes that are engineered for the kind of stresses using this kind of set up would create. So my guess it that it might work temporarily, but sooner or later the hot shoe would break or bend enough to no longer work reliably.

I don’t mean hanging the camera. It’s camera, hot shoe side on top, 3/8” -16 gets directed to a head and another camera gets attached below

It will break.

That's why cages were invented; to attach heavier stuff to camera bodies. You'd probably need something customizable; check https://www.smallrig.com/?gclid=Cj0KCQjw3f6HBhDHARIsAD_i3D9Q14qLNmXO_lADsXFI0eIf63FW6spogzVIYvE9dfNfNNM3DHfH-bsaAp0lEALw_wcB

I've never seen it for a second camera body on top. There are rails and such for side-by-side for like 3d, see eg http://www.photographers-resource.co.uk/photography/3D/3D_taking_two.htm

sybersitizen Forum Pro • Posts: 21,055
Re: Mounting a DSLR on top of another.
5

WongRQ wrote:

... why not just have an articulating arm on top of the hot shoe and mount another DSLR on the other end (use adapters if needed)

The normal way is to mount the cameras side-by-side on a dual support like this:

JimH123 Veteran Member • Posts: 3,189
Re: Mounting a DSLR on top of another.

robgendreau wrote:

WongRQ wrote:

Mika Y. wrote:

WongRQ wrote:

Hi everyone,

MultiCam productions are useful in case you want to jump between them each cut but they require you to carry another tripod around so why not just have an articulating arm on top of the hot shoe and mount another DSLR on the other end (use adapters if needed)

Is it dangerous though? Will the camera just break into pieces after long hours or are they tough enough?

I doubt any consumer camera products have hot shoes that are engineered for the kind of stresses using this kind of set up would create. So my guess it that it might work temporarily, but sooner or later the hot shoe would break or bend enough to no longer work reliably.

I don’t mean hanging the camera. It’s camera, hot shoe side on top, 3/8” -16 gets directed to a head and another camera gets attached below

It will break.

That's why cages were invented; to attach heavier stuff to camera bodies. You'd probably need something customizable; check https://www.smallrig.com/?gclid=Cj0KCQjw3f6HBhDHARIsAD_i3D9Q14qLNmXO_lADsXFI0eIf63FW6spogzVIYvE9dfNfNNM3DHfH-bsaAp0lEALw_wcB

I've never seen it for a second camera body on top. There are rails and such for side-by-side for like 3d, see eg http://www.photographers-resource.co.uk/photography/3D/3D_taking_two.htm

Yes!  This is the way to do it.  I like using two cameras for astrophotography.  One camera with a telephoto and one with a wider angle to show where the telephoto one is pointing at.

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OP WongRQ Contributing Member • Posts: 558
Re: Mounting a DSLR on top of another.

robgendreau wrote:

WongRQ wrote:

Mika Y. wrote:

WongRQ wrote:

Hi everyone,

MultiCam productions are useful in case you want to jump between them each cut but they require you to carry another tripod around so why not just have an articulating arm on top of the hot shoe and mount another DSLR on the other end (use adapters if needed)

Is it dangerous though? Will the camera just break into pieces after long hours or are they tough enough?

I doubt any consumer camera products have hot shoes that are engineered for the kind of stresses using this kind of set up would create. So my guess it that it might work temporarily, but sooner or later the hot shoe would break or bend enough to no longer work reliably.

I don’t mean hanging the camera. It’s camera, hot shoe side on top, 3/8” -16 gets directed to a head and another camera gets attached below

It will break.

That's why cages were invented; to attach heavier stuff to camera bodies. You'd probably need something customizable; check https://www.smallrig.com/?gclid=Cj0KCQjw3f6HBhDHARIsAD_i3D9Q14qLNmXO_lADsXFI0eIf63FW6spogzVIYvE9dfNfNNM3DHfH-bsaAp0lEALw_wcB

I've never seen it for a second camera body on top. There are rails and such for side-by-side for like 3d, see eg http://www.photographers-resource.co.uk/photography/3D/3D_taking_two.htm

Ok thanks for the clarification

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FrancoD Forum Pro • Posts: 15,621
Re: Mounting a DSLR on top of another.

WongRQ wrote:

Mika Y. wrote:

WongRQ wrote:

Hi everyone,

MultiCam productions are useful in case you want to jump between them each cut but they require you to carry another tripod around so why not just have an articulating arm on top of the hot shoe and mount another DSLR on the other end (use adapters if needed)

Is it dangerous though? Will the camera just break into pieces after long hours or are they tough enough?

I doubt any consumer camera products have hot shoes that are engineered for the kind of stresses using this kind of set up would create. So my guess it that it might work temporarily, but sooner or later the hot shoe would break or bend enough to no longer work reliably.

I don’t mean hanging the camera. It’s camera, hot shoe side on top, 3/8” -16 gets directed to a head and another camera gets attached below

I strongly suggest that before you do any mod to your camera or lenses whatsoever, come back and ask...

BTW, please  do not attempt any sort of home rennovation either.

alcelc
alcelc Forum Pro • Posts: 15,956
Re: Mounting a DSLR on top of another.
1

Would an extension rod, with 2 or 3 tripod heads adapted on it, be attached to a monopod or tripod, works for you?

Camera reviewers do it for quite some times already to compare multiple cameras.

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OP WongRQ Contributing Member • Posts: 558
Re: Mounting a DSLR on top of another.

alcelc wrote:

Would an extension rod, with 2 or 3 tripod heads adapted on it, be attached to a monopod or tripod, works for you?

Camera reviewers do it for quite some times already to compare multiple cameras.

Hi, I see. Thanks did your suggestion

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PerTulip Senior Member • Posts: 1,589
Re: Mounting a DSLR on top of another.

WongRQ wrote:

...Is it dangerous though? Will the camera just break into pieces after long hours or are they tough enough?

You really need to hate your camera to even attempt that....

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