Macro Assistance

Started 3 months ago | Discussions
cpharm86 Senior Member • Posts: 2,590
Macro Assistance

I would like to shoot more macro shots and hoping for suggestions. I am using the Canon R5, Canon RF 100 2.8 Macro and just purchased a Raynox DCR-250 macro conversion lens.

Prior to trying the Raynox DCR-250 I was able to take decent macro shots handheld. With the conversion lens it appears to be almost impossible. I can't keep stuff in focus long enough to get a decent shot.

Would I need just to use a tripod or do I need a focusing rail also?

Thank you for your advice.

Canon EOS R5
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gardenersassistant Veteran Member • Posts: 8,964
Re: Macro Assistance

cpharm86 wrote:

I would like to shoot more macro shots and hoping for suggestions. I am using the Canon R5, Canon RF 100 2.8 Macro and just purchased a Raynox DCR-250 macro conversion lens.

Prior to trying the Raynox DCR-250 I was able to take decent macro shots handheld. With the conversion lens it appears to be almost impossible. I can't keep stuff in focus long enough to get a decent shot.

Would I need just to use a tripod or do I need a focusing rail also?

Thank you for your advice.

There are various options. First though, some questions:

  • Do you know that with a Raynox 250 the working distance between the front of the Raynox and the subject has to be no more than 125mm, and not much less? (If the working distance is not in that range then you won't be able to get a sharp image.)
  • Are you using autofocus or manual focus?
  • Are you using natural light or flash?
  • Are you photographing animals (insects, spiders etc), flowers, berries etc or something else?
  • If your subjects are insects etc, are they on something that is moving in a breeze and/or are they moving around?
  • If your subjects are insects etc and aren't moving around and aren't on something that is moving in a breeze, how much time do you typically have before they move away?

The answers to these questions and any other information you can provide about what you are trying to do and how you are going about it will make it easier to provide you with appropriate advice.

OP cpharm86 Senior Member • Posts: 2,590
Re: Macro Assistance

gardenersassistant wrote:

cpharm86 wrote:

I would like to shoot more macro shots and hoping for suggestions. I am using the Canon R5, Canon RF 100 2.8 Macro and just purchased a Raynox DCR-250 macro conversion lens.

Prior to trying the Raynox DCR-250 I was able to take decent macro shots handheld. With the conversion lens it appears to be almost impossible. I can't keep stuff in focus long enough to get a decent shot.

Would I need just to use a tripod or do I need a focusing rail also?

Thank you for your advice.

There are various options. First though, some questions:

  • Do you know that with a Raynox 250 the working distance between the front of the Raynox and the subject has to be no more than 125mm, and not much less? (If the working distance is not in that range then you won't be able to get a sharp image.)
  • Are you using autofocus or manual focus?
  • Are you using natural light or flash?
  • Are you photographing animals (insects, spiders etc), flowers, berries etc or something else?
  • If your subjects are insects etc, are they on something that is moving in a breeze and/or are they moving around?
  • If your subjects are insects etc and aren't moving around and aren't on something that is moving in a breeze, how much time do you typically have before they move away?

The answers to these questions and any other information you can provide about what you are trying to do and how you are going about it will make it easier to provide you with appropriate advice.

I realized now that focusing distance is shallow.

I was using manual and auto focus

I was using natural light but have a speed light available

Photographing insects in this case. Not moving in this case  but I have shot macro without Raynox with moving insects

So far I don’t think the Raynox is going to work for me and might send it back and use without.

Thank you for your response.

Gary from Seattle Veteran Member • Posts: 5,918
Re: Macro Assistance

cpharm86 wrote:

I would like to shoot more macro shots and hoping for suggestions. I am using the Canon R5, Canon RF 100 2.8 Macro and just purchased a Raynox DCR-250 macro conversion lens.

Prior to trying the Raynox DCR-250 I was able to take decent macro shots handheld. With the conversion lens it appears to be almost impossible. I can't keep stuff in focus long enough to get a decent shot.

Personally, I would ordinarily find the same. With body motion and a really shallow DOF, it would be hard to know exactly where the focus would fall as you shoot.

Would I need just to use a tripod or do I need a focusing rail also?

I've not a focusing rail, but use a tripod (mostly shooting mosses). It is challenging to shoot even with the tripod if you are going for maximum magnification because of the DOF and precision issues; but it can be done. When adjusting for a shot, I push the tripod from the tripod feet instead of higher up on the tripod; for me this makes small adjustments possible.

Thank you for your advice.

 Gary from Seattle's gear list:Gary from Seattle's gear list
Olympus E-M1 Olympus E-M1 II Olympus OM-D E-M1X Olympus Zuiko Digital 1.4x Teleconverter EC-14 Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 75-300mm 1:4.8-6.7 +5 more
BBbuilder467 Veteran Member • Posts: 5,625
Re: Macro Assistance

cpharm86 wrote:

I would like to shoot more macro shots and hoping for suggestions. I am using the Canon R5, Canon RF 100 2.8 Macro and just purchased a Raynox DCR-250 macro conversion lens.

Prior to trying the Raynox DCR-250 I was able to take decent macro shots handheld. With the conversion lens it appears to be almost impossible. I can't keep stuff in focus long enough to get a decent shot.

Would I need just to use a tripod or do I need a focusing rail also?

Thank you for your advice.

To answer your question, you would need a focusing rail or you couldn't get the Image size and focus with the camera stationary on the tripod. You might not notice hand-held, but you're moving to a point to lock focus.

1:1 in full frame is relatively easy hand-held. Get beyond that and it's a lot more difficult and much easier with flash. You'll need to stop down more as you increase the magnification, so you won't have much shutter speed.

OP cpharm86 Senior Member • Posts: 2,590
Re: Macro Assistance

Gary from Seattle wrote:

cpharm86 wrote:

I would like to shoot more macro shots and hoping for suggestions. I am using the Canon R5, Canon RF 100 2.8 Macro and just purchased a Raynox DCR-250 macro conversion lens.

Prior to trying the Raynox DCR-250 I was able to take decent macro shots handheld. With the conversion lens it appears to be almost impossible. I can't keep stuff in focus long enough to get a decent shot.

Personally, I would ordinarily find the same. With body motion and a really shallow DOF, it would be hard to know exactly where the focus would fall as you shoot.

Would I need just to use a tripod or do I need a focusing rail also?

I've not a focusing rail, but use a tripod (mostly shooting mosses). It is challenging to shoot even with the tripod if you are going for maximum magnification because of the DOF and precision issues; but it can be done. When adjusting for a shot, I push the tripod from the tripod feet instead of higher up on the tripod; for me this makes small adjustments possible.

Thank you for your advice.

I was trying to avoid purchasing a focusing rail but if I decide to keep the Raynox I might need one if moving the tripod feet does not work for me.

OP cpharm86 Senior Member • Posts: 2,590
Re: Macro Assistance

BBbuilder467 wrote:

cpharm86 wrote:

I would like to shoot more macro shots and hoping for suggestions. I am using the Canon R5, Canon RF 100 2.8 Macro and just purchased a Raynox DCR-250 macro conversion lens.

Prior to trying the Raynox DCR-250 I was able to take decent macro shots handheld. With the conversion lens it appears to be almost impossible. I can't keep stuff in focus long enough to get a decent shot.

Would I need just to use a tripod or do I need a focusing rail also?

Thank you for your advice.

To answer your question, you would need a focusing rail or you couldn't get the Image size and focus with the camera stationary on the tripod. You might not notice hand-held, but you're moving to a point to lock focus.

1:1 in full frame is relatively easy hand-held. Get beyond that and it's a lot more difficult and much easier with flash. You'll need to stop down more as you increase the magnification, so you won't have much shutter speed.

Do you think it is worth keeping the Raynox?

BBbuilder467 Veteran Member • Posts: 5,625
Re: Macro Assistance

cpharm86 wrote:

BBbuilder467 wrote:

cpharm86 wrote:

I would like to shoot more macro shots and hoping for suggestions. I am using the Canon R5, Canon RF 100 2.8 Macro and just purchased a Raynox DCR-250 macro conversion lens.

Prior to trying the Raynox DCR-250 I was able to take decent macro shots handheld. With the conversion lens it appears to be almost impossible. I can't keep stuff in focus long enough to get a decent shot.

Would I need just to use a tripod or do I need a focusing rail also?

Thank you for your advice.

To answer your question, you would need a focusing rail or you couldn't get the Image size and focus with the camera stationary on the tripod. You might not notice hand-held, but you're moving to a point to lock focus.

1:1 in full frame is relatively easy hand-held. Get beyond that and it's a lot more difficult and much easier with flash. You'll need to stop down more as you increase the magnification, so you won't have much shutter speed.

Do you think it is worth keeping the Raynox?

I couldn't say. I have no interest in much beyond 1:1 in full frame and hand-held, I use flash and/or a monopod. I don't like being locked into the range of a diopter or extension tubes. I'm more interested in close-ups.

gardenersassistant Veteran Member • Posts: 8,964
Re: Macro Assistance
1

cpharm86 wrote:

gardenersassistant wrote:

cpharm86 wrote:

I would like to shoot more macro shots and hoping for suggestions. I am using the Canon R5, Canon RF 100 2.8 Macro and just purchased a Raynox DCR-250 macro conversion lens.

Prior to trying the Raynox DCR-250 I was able to take decent macro shots handheld. With the conversion lens it appears to be almost impossible. I can't keep stuff in focus long enough to get a decent shot.

Would I need just to use a tripod or do I need a focusing rail also?

Thank you for your advice.

There are various options. First though, some questions:

  • Do you know that with a Raynox 250 the working distance between the front of the Raynox and the subject has to be no more than 125mm, and not much less? (If the working distance is not in that range then you won't be able to get a sharp image.)
  • Are you using autofocus or manual focus?
  • Are you using natural light or flash?
  • Are you photographing animals (insects, spiders etc), flowers, berries etc or something else?
  • If your subjects are insects etc, are they on something that is moving in a breeze and/or are they moving around?
  • If your subjects are insects etc and aren't moving around and aren't on something that is moving in a breeze, how much time do you typically have before they move away?

The answers to these questions and any other information you can provide about what you are trying to do and how you are going about it will make it easier to provide you with appropriate advice.

I realized now that focusing distance is shallow.

I was using manual and auto focus

I was using natural light but have a speed light available

Photographing insects in this case. Not moving in this case but I have shot macro without Raynox with moving insects

This is making me wonder what specifically the problem is with the Raynox. I suspect it might be the need to get the working distance within a fairly narrow window with the Raynox 250.

I used a Raynox 250 quite a lot, and a Raynox 150 a lot more, which is less powerful but easier to use because there is more latitude in the working distance. I recall that I started with the Raynox 250 and almost gave up on it after a day or two because I couldn't get anything in to focus. Then it started working for me and I happily used Raynoxes and other close-up lenses for over a decade before moving to my current setup.

You might want to practice a bit more before giving up on the Raynox.

So far I don’t think the Raynox is going to work for me and might send it back and use without.

Thank you for your response.

macrouser
macrouser Senior Member • Posts: 2,764
Re: Macro Assistance

I have a focusing rail but it is only good if the subject is holding still and I need to get very precise focus on very small objects.  If I ever do focus stacking of stationary objects, I will use it for that.  I will never use it for moving insects.

I really good steady tripod is well worth getting.  Even with that, I still use it more to brace my hand against than putting the camera on it.

There is a vast amount to learn about wildlife macro photography.  Keep practicing and learning.

 macrouser's gear list:macrouser's gear list
Sony SLT-A77 Sony a7R III Sigma 150mm F2.8 EX DG Macro HSM Sony FE 90mm F2.8 macro Sony FE 70-300mm F4.5-5.6 G OSS +2 more
OP cpharm86 Senior Member • Posts: 2,590
Re: Macro Assistance

gardenersassistant wrote:

cpharm86 wrote:

gardenersassistant wrote:

cpharm86 wrote:

I would like to shoot more macro shots and hoping for suggestions. I am using the Canon R5, Canon RF 100 2.8 Macro and just purchased a Raynox DCR-250 macro conversion lens.

Prior to trying the Raynox DCR-250 I was able to take decent macro shots handheld. With the conversion lens it appears to be almost impossible. I can't keep stuff in focus long enough to get a decent shot.

Would I need just to use a tripod or do I need a focusing rail also?

Thank you for your advice.

There are various options. First though, some questions:

  • Do you know that with a Raynox 250 the working distance between the front of the Raynox and the subject has to be no more than 125mm, and not much less? (If the working distance is not in that range then you won't be able to get a sharp image.)
  • Are you using autofocus or manual focus?
  • Are you using natural light or flash?
  • Are you photographing animals (insects, spiders etc), flowers, berries etc or something else?
  • If your subjects are insects etc, are they on something that is moving in a breeze and/or are they moving around?
  • If your subjects are insects etc and aren't moving around and aren't on something that is moving in a breeze, how much time do you typically have before they move away?

The answers to these questions and any other information you can provide about what you are trying to do and how you are going about it will make it easier to provide you with appropriate advice.

I realized now that focusing distance is shallow.

I was using manual and auto focus

I was using natural light but have a speed light available

Photographing insects in this case. Not moving in this case but I have shot macro without Raynox with moving insects

This is making me wonder what specifically the problem is with the Raynox. I suspect it might be the need to get the working distance within a fairly narrow window with the Raynox 250.

I used a Raynox 250 quite a lot, and a Raynox 150 a lot more, which is less powerful but easier to use because there is more latitude in the working distance. I recall that I started with the Raynox 250 and almost gave up on it after a day or two because I couldn't get anything in to focus. Then it started working for me and I happily used Raynoxes and other close-up lenses for over a decade before moving to my current setup.

You might want to practice a bit more before giving up on the Raynox.

I’ll work with it more. Just curious what other setup you have? The cost keeps on going!

So far I don’t think the Raynox is going to work for me and might send it back and use without.

Thank you for your response.

gardenersassistant Veteran Member • Posts: 8,964
Re: Macro Assistance

cpharm86 wrote:

gardenersassistant wrote:

You might want to practice a bit more before giving up on the Raynox.

I’ll work with it more. Just curious what other setup you have? The cost keeps on going!

My current setup is a bit unusual. It is big and heavy, and still under development .(Adjusting our rigs can be a process on and off for years for some of us. Especially with flash diffuser setups it doesn't have to be expensive). In a week or so my rig will be getting a bit more complicated, and heavier, at least for an experimental period.

Note though that you can get excellent results from much smaller, lighter and simpler setups. For over a decade my most used close-up lens setups used tiny sensor bridge cameras.

OP cpharm86 Senior Member • Posts: 2,590
Re: Macro Assistance

gardenersassistant wrote:

cpharm86 wrote:

gardenersassistant wrote:

You might want to practice a bit more before giving up on the Raynox.

I’ll work with it more. Just curious what other setup you have? The cost keeps on going!

My current setup is a bit unusual. It is big and heavy, and still under development .(Adjusting our rigs can be a process on and off for years for some of us. Especially with flash diffuser setups it doesn't have to be expensive). In a week or so my rig will be getting a bit more complicated, and heavier, at least for an experimental period.

Note though that you can get excellent results from much smaller, lighter and simpler setups. For over a decade my most used close-up lens setups used tiny sensor bridge cameras.

Very impressive rig! I can tell you I’ll be lucky to use just what I have. 

I looked at your website (Flickr) and impressed with those shots! Thank you again for your help.

Pixel Pooper Veteran Member • Posts: 3,955
Re: Macro Assistance

I use the Raynox 250 with a 90mm macro lens, but always with a diffused speedlight. I think I would have trouble getting sharp shots without the flash.

Adding the Raynox does reduce depth of field quite a bit, so I stop down the aperture at least one stop when I have it attached.

gardenersassistant Veteran Member • Posts: 8,964
Re: Macro Assistance

cpharm86 wrote:

gardenersassistant wrote:

cpharm86 wrote:

gardenersassistant wrote:

You might want to practice a bit more before giving up on the Raynox.

I’ll work with it more. Just curious what other setup you have? The cost keeps on going!

My current setup is a bit unusual. It is big and heavy, and still under development .(Adjusting our rigs can be a process on and off for years for some of us. Especially with flash diffuser setups it doesn't have to be expensive). In a week or so my rig will be getting a bit more complicated, and heavier, at least for an experimental period.

Note though that you can get excellent results from much smaller, lighter and simpler setups. For over a decade my most used close-up lens setups used tiny sensor bridge cameras.

Very impressive rig! I can tell you I’ll be lucky to use just what I have.

I looked at your website (Flickr) and impressed with those shots!

Thanks.

Thank you again for your help.

It's a pleasure.

OP cpharm86 Senior Member • Posts: 2,590
Re: Macro Assistance

gardenersassistant wrote:

cpharm86 wrote:

I would like to shoot more macro shots and hoping for suggestions. I am using the Canon R5, Canon RF 100 2.8 Macro and just purchased a Raynox DCR-250 macro conversion lens.

Prior to trying the Raynox DCR-250 I was able to take decent macro shots handheld. With the conversion lens it appears to be almost impossible. I can't keep stuff in focus long enough to get a decent shot.

Would I need just to use a tripod or do I need a focusing rail also?

Thank you for your advice.

There are various options. First though, some questions:

  • Do you know that with a Raynox 250 the working distance between the front of the Raynox and the subject has to be no more than 125mm, and not much less? (If the working distance is not in that range then you won't be able to get a sharp image.)
  • Are you using autofocus or manual focus?
  • Are you using natural light or flash?
  • Are you photographing animals (insects, spiders etc), flowers, berries etc or something else?
  • If your subjects are insects etc, are they on something that is moving in a breeze and/or are they moving around?
  • If your subjects are insects etc and aren't moving around and aren't on something that is moving in a breeze, how much time do you typically have before they move away?

The answers to these questions and any other information you can provide about what you are trying to do and how you are going about it will make it easier to provide you with appropriate advice.

Do you know the focusing distance for the Raynox 150? I can’t seem to find that information.

gardenersassistant Veteran Member • Posts: 8,964
Re: Macro Assistance

cpharm86 wrote:

gardenersassistant wrote:

cpharm86 wrote:

I would like to shoot more macro shots and hoping for suggestions. I am using the Canon R5, Canon RF 100 2.8 Macro and just purchased a Raynox DCR-250 macro conversion lens.

Prior to trying the Raynox DCR-250 I was able to take decent macro shots handheld. With the conversion lens it appears to be almost impossible. I can't keep stuff in focus long enough to get a decent shot.

Would I need just to use a tripod or do I need a focusing rail also?

Thank you for your advice.

There are various options. First though, some questions:

  • Do you know that with a Raynox 250 the working distance between the front of the Raynox and the subject has to be no more than 125mm, and not much less? (If the working distance is not in that range then you won't be able to get a sharp image.)
  • Are you using autofocus or manual focus?
  • Are you using natural light or flash?
  • Are you photographing animals (insects, spiders etc), flowers, berries etc or something else?
  • If your subjects are insects etc, are they on something that is moving in a breeze and/or are they moving around?
  • If your subjects are insects etc and aren't moving around and aren't on something that is moving in a breeze, how much time do you typically have before they move away?

The answers to these questions and any other information you can provide about what you are trying to do and how you are going about it will make it easier to provide you with appropriate advice.

Do you know the focusing distance for the Raynox 150? I can’t seem to find that information.

For any close-up lens, the maximum focusing distance (when the camera lens is focused at infinity) is around 1000mm / diopters. The Raynox 150 is 4.8 diopters, so the maximum focusing distance is around 1000mm / 4.8 = 208mm. I say "around" because the measured value may vary a bit from the calculated value. For example with a Raynox 150 mounted on a 55-250 lens on a Canon 70D, with the 55-250 focused at infinity, I measured a focusing distance of around 201mm.

The minimum focusing distance depends on how close the lens it is mounted on can focus. To give you some idea though, with a Raynox 150 mounted on the same 70D setup the minimum focusing distance is around 150mm. This means there is a focusing distance "window" of around 50mm, from around 150mm to 200mm. This makes it much easier to use than the Raynox 250, for which the focusing distance window on this setup is much less, around 20mm, from around 95mm to 115mm.

OP cpharm86 Senior Member • Posts: 2,590
Re: Macro Assistance

gardenersassistant wrote:

cpharm86 wrote:

gardenersassistant wrote:

cpharm86 wrote:

I would like to shoot more macro shots and hoping for suggestions. I am using the Canon R5, Canon RF 100 2.8 Macro and just purchased a Raynox DCR-250 macro conversion lens.

Prior to trying the Raynox DCR-250 I was able to take decent macro shots handheld. With the conversion lens it appears to be almost impossible. I can't keep stuff in focus long enough to get a decent shot.

Would I need just to use a tripod or do I need a focusing rail also?

Thank you for your advice.

There are various options. First though, some questions:

  • Do you know that with a Raynox 250 the working distance between the front of the Raynox and the subject has to be no more than 125mm, and not much less? (If the working distance is not in that range then you won't be able to get a sharp image.)
  • Are you using autofocus or manual focus?
  • Are you using natural light or flash?
  • Are you photographing animals (insects, spiders etc), flowers, berries etc or something else?
  • If your subjects are insects etc, are they on something that is moving in a breeze and/or are they moving around?
  • If your subjects are insects etc and aren't moving around and aren't on something that is moving in a breeze, how much time do you typically have before they move away?

The answers to these questions and any other information you can provide about what you are trying to do and how you are going about it will make it easier to provide you with appropriate advice.

Do you know the focusing distance for the Raynox 150? I can’t seem to find that information.

For any close-up lens, the maximum focusing distance (when the camera lens is focused at infinity) is around 1000mm / diopters. The Raynox 150 is 4.8 diopters, so the maximum focusing distance is around 1000mm / 4.8 = 208mm. I say "around" because the measured value may vary a bit from the calculated value. For example with a Raynox 150 mounted on a 55-250 lens on a Canon 70D, with the 55-250 focused at infinity, I measured a focusing distance of around 201mm.

The minimum focusing distance depends on how close the lens it is mounted on can focus. To give you some idea though, with a Raynox 150 mounted on the same 70D setup the minimum focusing distance is around 150mm. This means there is a focusing distance "window" of around 50mm, from around 150mm to 200mm. This makes it much easier to use than the Raynox 250, for which the focusing distance window on this setup is much less, around 20mm, from around 95mm to 115mm.

Great explantation. Thank you.

I went ahead and ordered the Raynox DCR-150 today also. I will test this and the DCR-250. Probably keep them both. Not that expensive.

gardenersassistant Veteran Member • Posts: 8,964
Re: Macro Assistance

cpharm86 wrote:

gardenersassistant wrote:

cpharm86 wrote:

gardenersassistant wrote:

cpharm86 wrote:

I would like to shoot more macro shots and hoping for suggestions. I am using the Canon R5, Canon RF 100 2.8 Macro and just purchased a Raynox DCR-250 macro conversion lens.

Prior to trying the Raynox DCR-250 I was able to take decent macro shots handheld. With the conversion lens it appears to be almost impossible. I can't keep stuff in focus long enough to get a decent shot.

Would I need just to use a tripod or do I need a focusing rail also?

Thank you for your advice.

There are various options. First though, some questions:

  • Do you know that with a Raynox 250 the working distance between the front of the Raynox and the subject has to be no more than 125mm, and not much less? (If the working distance is not in that range then you won't be able to get a sharp image.)
  • Are you using autofocus or manual focus?
  • Are you using natural light or flash?
  • Are you photographing animals (insects, spiders etc), flowers, berries etc or something else?
  • If your subjects are insects etc, are they on something that is moving in a breeze and/or are they moving around?
  • If your subjects are insects etc and aren't moving around and aren't on something that is moving in a breeze, how much time do you typically have before they move away?

The answers to these questions and any other information you can provide about what you are trying to do and how you are going about it will make it easier to provide you with appropriate advice.

Do you know the focusing distance for the Raynox 150? I can’t seem to find that information.

For any close-up lens, the maximum focusing distance (when the camera lens is focused at infinity) is around 1000mm / diopters. The Raynox 150 is 4.8 diopters, so the maximum focusing distance is around 1000mm / 4.8 = 208mm. I say "around" because the measured value may vary a bit from the calculated value. For example with a Raynox 150 mounted on a 55-250 lens on a Canon 70D, with the 55-250 focused at infinity, I measured a focusing distance of around 201mm.

The minimum focusing distance depends on how close the lens it is mounted on can focus. To give you some idea though, with a Raynox 150 mounted on the same 70D setup the minimum focusing distance is around 150mm. This means there is a focusing distance "window" of around 50mm, from around 150mm to 200mm. This makes it much easier to use than the Raynox 250, for which the focusing distance window on this setup is much less, around 20mm, from around 95mm to 115mm.

Great explantation. Thank you.

I went ahead and ordered the Raynox DCR-150 today also. I will test this and the DCR-250. Probably keep them both. Not that expensive.

I very much like the Raynox 150. It was my most used close-up lens for insects, spiders etc for many years. I hope you enjoy yours, although I suspect that using it on a 100mm macro might not provide you enough magnification.

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