* Wed C&C "No Theme" Thread #690 on 2021 07 14 *

Started 5 months ago | Discussions
Mike Fewster Veteran Member • Posts: 8,615
Re: Cradle Mountain

Kumsal wrote:

A spot I know very well on the walk from the car park to the boat house. What you see at the spot is a gamble. The light and clouds change very rapidly. Sometimes you see some of the peaks, Sometimes none of the peaks. Sometimes snow.

The little opening of sunlight bringing out the top edges is a nice catch. You might try adding some contrast to the clouds. There are some billowing edges there that could link to the edges on the peaks and give a little more contrast for the peak edges as well.

General info. The shot was taken in 2005. Currently a big (heated!) visitor centre is being constructed at the car park with big windows so this view can be admired in comfort.

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Mike Fewster
Adelaide Australia

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RoelHendrickx
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Re: Blinded Horses ..

LouHolland wrote:

Nice horses, why they are sometimes blindfolded in the meadow is a riddle to me!

Lou

enlarge for better view

Those horse look so nice and shiny: they exude health.

Has there been any news of Don lately or has he been completely forgotten?

Don is alright.  I am in email contact with him.

He is just not photographing much anymore, although I do urge him occasionally to participate in the thread with whatever image he wants to share, because I think I can speak for many if I say that we all loved his quirky, totally fresh and original photography and his eloquent comments.

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Roel Hendrickx
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RoelHendrickx
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Re: Exploring a Matador

Mike Fewster wrote:

RoelHendrickx wrote:

February 2020 marked the last time that we really traveled abroad (except for the odd little trips just across the French and Dutch borders, to visit an exhibition or go for a walk - nd except for that short window in the summer of 2020 when travel was briefly allowed and we spent two weeks in the German countryside, driving our car and riding our bikes).

That last trip by plane took us to Madrid for an extended weekend citytrip.

One of the landmarks we visited on that trip, was the Plaza de Toros.

On the square surrounding this impressive bullring are several statues, and the one shown in three of these images, is the most dynamic of those.

I am showing four images here, taken on various moments before and after our visit, to illustrate the way I am seldom satisfied with the first image I make of any object or location.

It can happen that the very first image is immediately the best, but more often, there is a benefit in exploring angles and perspectives and focal lengths. You be the judge.

One of my standard approaches :photographing someone photographing the object

From one of the balconies of the bullring : a telephoto image showing how the statue "levitates". Waiting for a background with zero cars proved impossible. The selfie-takers were an opportunity I could not let pass, and fortunately, the cars in the background are nothing else than two Madrilene taxis in Spanish colours. Imagine this with a blue garbage truck. Not the same.

Back on the square, and looking at another statue, the idea germinated to photograph the statue in relation to the actual bull ring.

... which led to this final composition. I shot from nearby with wide angle and avoided the pavement in order to eliminate all hints of contemporary aspects (pedestrians, etc) and give the image a certain abstraction and timelessness.

It is always rewarding when the photographer shares their thoughts on the journey they make to decide on a composition.

That is why the Magnum book "Contact Sheets" is one of my favourite photography publications.  It allows you to see for yourself how some great photographers made some of their iconic images.  Some of them filled a roll of film with a myriad of different subjects (many equally brilliant - think Koudelka in Prague in 1968).  Other contacts sheets show how the photographer explores options and perspectives, with the "best" image not often the first, but also not often the last.

The bullfighter/toro statue with the suspended figure would worry me if I was a matador arriving for an appointment inside. He looks as though he is being tossed in the air by the bull. Guess you win some and lose some.

Number two has a nice comparison between the traditional figures in the statue and the selfie snappers. It brought to mind a favourite book "Or I'll Dress You in Mourning" with its theme of a desperately poor young man whose one chance to escape grinding rural poverty for himself and his family is to be a successful matador. The story of El Cordobes.

I remember clearly you making that recommendation to me at the time I was mentioning that I would be traveling to Madrid.  I got the book on my Kindle and read it with a fast-beating heart.  It is a great work of documentary literature, mixing the story of El Cordobes with that of Spain.

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Roel Hendrickx
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Mike Fewster Veteran Member • Posts: 8,615
Re: Favorite Meadow - Sequoia NP

RoelHendrickx wrote:

minniev wrote:

We spent more time in Sequoia NP than in Yosemite in last month's trip. My son was seduced by the big old trees. This was my favorite meadow, a little off the beaten path with no marked trails. My grandson loved the trees too - he has always been a tree climber, and he had never had such amazing trees to tackle before, and so many ways to explore them.

It's a very short photo story, I guess.

The meadow as we stumbled upon it, late afternoon.

You'll have to look closely to find the little boy hidden in this upturned giant.

Son and grandson doing their log walking routine.

A paradise of lush, sun-caressed greenery wrapped around old giants like a comfy blanket.

It's like a story of growth, majestic decay and fresh renewal. The cycle of life.

So it is fitting that you populate that scene also with your offspring (and his own).

On a more mundane level, they provide scale.

Just as Roel says.

Enjoying and preserving places like this has to be part of the landscape photographer's motivation. They speak of life in all its diversity.

A family photo that is so much more than a snapshot memory.

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Mike Fewster
Adelaide Australia

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Mike Fewster Veteran Member • Posts: 8,615
Re: Rural

KeesSmeele wrote:

Two pics of a row of pollard willows in various stages of decay. The landscape version places the trees in their rural setting. The portrait version emphasizes the whimsical shapes of the trees. I have a slight preference for the landscape version, because of the balance between water and land, and because of the different horizontal and vertical lines in the composition.

I agree with you re version 1. The horizontal band of blue sky creates another horizontal line within the overall repeating lines that create the composition. The longer line of pollarded trees lets us see the dead stumps as individuals. There is something of the "The Paths of glory lead but..." feel in the shot. We recognize the size and grandeur that was once what are now decaying stumps. We link them to the line of thriving younger trees behind.

A photo for philosophers and sermons.

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Mike Fewster
Adelaide Australia

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minniev Veteran Member • Posts: 3,940
Re: Exploring a Matador

What an interesting series, to show the statue from the different angles and vantage points and with and without the human visitors. You remind us that there is more than one "right" way to compose an image. The second is my favorite, with all the arms extended in unison, and the the red taxi supported, like a circus balancing trick, by the matador's arm.

RoelHendrickx wrote:

February 2020 marked the last time that we really traveled abroad (except for the odd little trips just across the French and Dutch borders, to visit an exhibition or go for a walk - nd except for that short window in the summer of 2020 when travel was briefly allowed and we spent two weeks in the German countryside, driving our car and riding our bikes).

That last trip by plane took us to Madrid for an extended weekend citytrip.

One of the landmarks we visited on that trip, was the Plaza de Toros.

On the square surrounding this impressive bullring are several statues, and the one shown in three of these images, is the most dynamic of those.

I am showing four images here, taken on various moments before and after our visit, to illustrate the way I am seldom satisfied with the first image I make of any object or location.

It can happen that the very first image is immediately the best, but more often, there is a benefit in exploring angles and perspectives and focal lengths. You be the judge.

One of my standard approaches :photographing someone photographing the object

From one of the balconies of the bullring : a telephoto image showing how the statue "levitates". Waiting for a background with zero cars proved impossible. The selfie-takers were an opportunity I could not let pass, and fortunately, the cars in the background are nothing else than two Madrilene taxis in Spanish colours. Imagine this with a blue garbage truck. Not the same.

Back on the square, and looking at another statue, the idea germinated to photograph the statue in relation to the actual bull ring.

... which led to this final composition. I shot from nearby with wide angle and avoided the pavement in order to eliminate all hints of contemporary aspects (pedestrians, etc) and give the image a certain abstraction and timelessness.

minniev Veteran Member • Posts: 3,940
Re: Cradle Mountain

You remind me, as Mike often does. of why I would love to see Tasmania. Elegant, wild, remote landscape with rugged soaring peaks, lavish vegetation, water and even snow. The light is delicate and the blue sky barely peeps over the clouds, but the effect is gorgeous.

Kumsal wrote:

minniev Veteran Member • Posts: 3,940
Re: I missed one from the series

Nice series to illustrate a fun, funky little spot that seems right out of Aussie Central Casting, a mix of Queen Victoria herself and Crocodile Dundee. Good call to keep the lighting darkened and natural, flash would have ruined these images. As they are, there's a richness of color and tone in the shadows that makes us feel like we're there - warm, friendly, casual, eclectic.

Love the sleepy little barefoot fellow in the pj's.

Mike Fewster wrote:

Mike Fewster wrote:

When I looked at this week's posts, so far, I saw that Kumsal was taking us to Tasmania. I changed my mind about this weeks post, I've been giving Tassie a working over of late.

Dimboola. A little town in the Wimmera area of Victoria. Some years ago it was bypassed by the main highway and now it is fading away. We needed a place to stay a couple of months ago, got off the main highway and discovered Dimboola. These shots are of the hotel where we had an excellent meal, enjoyed time with the locals and found some very surprising rooms inside. You will be seeing more of Dimboola.

Dimboola is also the name of a famous Australian play and film. It tells the tale of a wedding. When staged, the play usually takes the form of a wedding reception and meal and the audience have a meal while the play goes on around them. This is the reference in photo 1.

PS. Light levels were very low inside and I decided to keep the feeling.

On the wall in the pub.

This should have been number four.

minniev Veteran Member • Posts: 3,940
Re: Rural

In addition to the nice colors and interesting forms, this set snaps me back to my one visit to the Netherlands a few years ago, where I first saw the pollard willows, often in this same condition as these. I was quite curious about the whys and wherefores  but our guide had little information. So you have reminded me to read up on it and I learned some things. There are very few pollarded trees that I've seen in North America, it just isn't done except for experimentation, mainly, I"m sure, because there is not a pressing need to do that.

KeesSmeele wrote:

Two pics of a row of pollard willows in various stages of decay. The landscape version places the trees in their rural setting. The portrait version emphasizes the whimsical shapes of the trees. I have a slight preference for the landscape version, because of the balance between water and land, and because of the different horizontal and vertical lines in the composition.

minniev Veteran Member • Posts: 3,940
Re: New shopping mall

Seldom does a shopping mall offer so many leading lines as this. The array of curves and leads is dizzying, but makes for an interesting composition.

Just a thought: converting the image to monochrome might give the lines more power.

Fox328 wrote:

Just recently the shopping mall nearby reopened as The Mall of The Netherlands. I like what they've done with it.

minniev Veteran Member • Posts: 3,940
Re: Blinded Horses ..

Sleek, well fed horses against a richly colored background. This shot reminds me a bit of the old postcards from the 30s and 40s with images commemorating the classic spring horse races - the Kentucky Derby, the Belmont Stakes, the Preakness. Have no idea why they would have blinkers on in the grazing field, unless it would be to get them used to the things. Some horses supposedly run better in them, but if they don't like them, they can become more hindrance than help.

LouHolland wrote:

Nice horses, why they are sometimes blindfolded in the meadow is a riddle to me!

Lou

enlarge for better view

Has there been any news of Don lately or has he been completely forgotten?

KeesSmeele
KeesSmeele Regular Member • Posts: 317
Re: Rural

Pollard willows were traditionally planted alongside ditches in lower land. Their roots enforced the banks of the ditches. They were also used for their twigs, which were harvested for use in wickerwork. The cutting of the twigs every few years creates the typical knot-shape of the tree. Though some of them appear to be dead, theay are not. All of them have new twigs and leaves by now.

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Regards,
Kees

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KeesSmeele
KeesSmeele Regular Member • Posts: 317
Re: Blinded Horses ..

LouHolland wrote:

Nice horses, why they are sometimes blindfolded in the meadow is a riddle to me!

Lou

enlarge for better view

Has there been any news of Don lately or has he been completely forgotten?

As my wife is a fanatic dressage rider and owns her owns horse, I can assure you that horses have a complete wardrobe of their own. Blankets for cold, for rain, to protect them against flys and other pests, reins, bits, eye ear and mouthcaps, even their own footwear.

There is something intruiging about the horses, at first is puzzeled me what it was and then I realized that they evoke a bit of a dreamy soft focus atmosphere in me. It does the picture well.

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Regards,
Kees

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KeesSmeele
KeesSmeele Regular Member • Posts: 317
Re: New shopping mall

Fox328 wrote:

Just recently the shopping mall nearby reopened as The Mall of The Netherlands. I like what they've done with it.

I agree with Minniev, its all about the curved lines. They lead you to the figures and the billboard in the centre and from there to the passage on the centre left of the image. Beautiful colors too.

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Kees

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KeesSmeele
KeesSmeele Regular Member • Posts: 317
Re: Favorite Meadow - Sequoia NP

minniev wrote:

We spent more time in Sequoia NP than in Yosemite in last month's trip. My son was seduced by the big old trees. This was my favorite meadow, a little off the beaten path with no marked trails. My grandson loved the trees too - he has always been a tree climber, and he had never had such amazing trees to tackle before, and so many ways to explore them.

It's a very short photo story, I guess.

The meadow as we stumbled upon it, late afternoon.

You'll have to look closely to find the little boy hidden in this upturned giant.

Son and grandson doing their log walking routine.

Lovely colors and lines in the compositions. The fallen tree in the front of picture 1 guides you to the massive tree on the right and invites you to go deeper into the forest.

Picture 2 gives me a feeling of decay. Even huge and strong trees are not spared by the forces of nature and the cycle of live.

Picture 3 represents the joy of an nice walk in nice weather and in a nice place.

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Kees

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KeesSmeele
KeesSmeele Regular Member • Posts: 317
Re: The Dimboola pub.

Mike Fewster wrote:

When I looked at this week's posts, so far, I saw that Kumsal was taking us to Tasmania. I changed my mind about this weeks post, I've been giving Tassie a working over of late.

Dimboola. A little town in the Wimmera area of Victoria. Some years ago it was bypassed by the main highway and now it is fading away. We needed a place to stay a couple of months ago, got off the main highway and discovered Dimboola. These shots are of the hotel where we had an excellent meal, enjoyed time with the locals and found some very surprising rooms inside. You will be seeing more of Dimboola.

Dimboola is also the name of a famous Australian play and film. It tells the tale of a wedding. When staged, the play usually takes the form of a wedding reception and meal and the audience have a meal while the play goes on around them. This is the reference in photo 1.

PS. Light levels were very low inside and I decided to keep the feeling.

On the wall in the pub.

That looks like a real old Victorian age hotel in your second image, emphasized by number 5. This could well be a place for a Agatha Christie 'who done it' episode. In a while all characters gather for the plot, where the detective will identify the murderer amongst them.

In contrast, the other images show a cozy place where families gather and have a good time. Nothing criminal at all.

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Regards,
Kees

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KeesSmeele
KeesSmeele Regular Member • Posts: 317
Re: Exploring a Matador

RoelHendrickx wrote:

February 2020 marked the last time that we really traveled abroad (except for the odd little trips just across the French and Dutch borders, to visit an exhibition or go for a walk - nd except for that short window in the summer of 2020 when travel was briefly allowed and we spent two weeks in the German countryside, driving our car and riding our bikes).

That last trip by plane took us to Madrid for an extended weekend citytrip.

One of the landmarks we visited on that trip, was the Plaza de Toros.

On the square surrounding this impressive bullring are several statues, and the one shown in three of these images, is the most dynamic of those.

I am showing four images here, taken on various moments before and after our visit, to illustrate the way I am seldom satisfied with the first image I make of any object or location.

It can happen that the very first image is immediately the best, but more often, there is a benefit in exploring angles and perspectives and focal lengths. You be the judge.

One of my standard approaches :photographing someone photographing the object

From one of the balconies of the bullring : a telephoto image showing how the statue "levitates". Waiting for a background with zero cars proved impossible. The selfie-takers were an opportunity I could not let pass, and fortunately, the cars in the background are nothing else than two Madrilene taxis in Spanish colours. Imagine this with a blue garbage truck. Not the same.

Back on the square, and looking at another statue, the idea germinated to photograph the statue in relation to the actual bull ring.

... which led to this final composition. I shot from nearby with wide angle and avoided the pavement in order to eliminate all hints of contemporary aspects (pedestrians, etc) and give the image a certain abstraction and timelessness.

Roel, your search for the right composition sounds familiar to me. I often look for different point of views and try different shots. I like your approach by showing the statues and the interaction with people. The sencond image proves today's selfie cult: unless you made a selfie you haven't visited the place.  The last two show the statue in their surrounding. The last one would be my pick. Like you described, the composition makes it timeless.

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Kees

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Mike Fewster Veteran Member • Posts: 8,615
Re: New shopping mall

minniev wrote:

Seldom does a shopping mall offer so many leading lines as this. The array of curves and leads is dizzying, but makes for an interesting composition.

Just a thought: converting the image to monochrome might give the lines more power.

Fox328 wrote:

Just recently the shopping mall nearby reopened as The Mall of The Netherlands. I like what they've done with it.

As Minniev has said. It's all about the swirl of lines that carry us down the mall. B&W would be better. There really isb't much down the mall to act as a focus. The colours, especially in the hanging sign, attract out attention on the way but are too small and not sufficiently interesting to become a subject. In B&W the lines would dominate and become the whole point of the image.

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Mike Fewster
Adelaide Australia

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Mike Fewster Veteran Member • Posts: 8,615
Re: Blinded Horses ..

LouHolland wrote:

Nice horses, why they are sometimes blindfolded in the meadow is a riddle to me!

Lou

enlarge for better view

Has there been any news of Don lately or has he been completely forgotten?

Any sort of cruelty to animals distresses me. That equine headgear would have bothered me as well. It is good to learn here that it is for the horse's comfort.

The photo brings out the head equipment and raises the question.  At the same time, they are magnificent horses in lush surroundings.  The photo emphasizes the gloss on the coats and they are relaxed in their cropping.  The answer is therefore no surprise.

The greens are a bit oversaturated for my taste but it helps us understand that these animals are very well cared for indeed.

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Mike Fewster
Adelaide Australia

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Fox328 Senior Member • Posts: 1,636
Re: Exploring a Matador

RoelHendrickx wrote:

February 2020 marked the last time that we really traveled abroad (except for the odd little trips just across the French and Dutch borders, to visit an exhibition or go for a walk - nd except for that short window in the summer of 2020 when travel was briefly allowed and we spent two weeks in the German countryside, driving our car and riding our bikes).

That last trip by plane took us to Madrid for an extended weekend citytrip.

One of the landmarks we visited on that trip, was the Plaza de Toros.

On the square surrounding this impressive bullring are several statues, and the one shown in three of these images, is the most dynamic of those.

I am showing four images here, taken on various moments before and after our visit, to illustrate the way I am seldom satisfied with the first image I make of any object or location.

It can happen that the very first image is immediately the best, but more often, there is a benefit in exploring angles and perspectives and focal lengths. You be the judge.

One of my standard approaches :photographing someone photographing the object

From one of the balconies of the bullring : a telephoto image showing how the statue "levitates". Waiting for a background with zero cars proved impossible. The selfie-takers were an opportunity I could not let pass, and fortunately, the cars in the background are nothing else than two Madrilene taxis in Spanish colours. Imagine this with a blue garbage truck. Not the same.

Back on the square, and looking at another statue, the idea germinated to photograph the statue in relation to the actual bull ring.

... which led to this final composition. I shot from nearby with wide angle and avoided the pavement in order to eliminate all hints of contemporary aspects (pedestrians, etc) and give the image a certain abstraction and timelessness.

This is difficult one.

What i like about the first one is that the centerpoint is not formed by the statue but by the group. The statue is merely an object proving the fact that "we've been there". The second one is more like "I've been there" but also shows us the funny fact that although the statue refers to tradition and a classical past it is surrounded by a very busy road. The third gives us the suggestion for the last which probably is the most beautiful picture of the series but doesn't give us the story of the first two ones. If i have to choose I will pick the second one as the winner.

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