The Black Demon

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DAP MV
DAP MV Contributing Member • Posts: 747
The Black Demon
5

Carpenter bee in 365nm UV. To make sure that only fluorescence is registered (not UV reflections), the UV filter was put on the lens.

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Darius

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Elliern Senior Member • Posts: 1,707
Re: The Black Demon

DAP MV wrote:

Carpenter bee in 365nm UV. To make sure that only fluorescence is registered (not UV reflections), the UV filter was put on the lens.

Interesting.  Thanks for sharing

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Ellie
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André BARELIER
André BARELIER Forum Pro • Posts: 10,724
Re: The Black Demon

DAP MV wrote:

Carpenter bee in 365nm UV. To make sure that only fluorescence is registered (not UV reflections), the UV filter was put on the lens.

I don't understand the technical explanation, but who cares? The image is fantastic.

Congratulations!

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André

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DAP MV
OP DAP MV Contributing Member • Posts: 747
Re: The Black Demon

André BARELIER wrote:

I don't understand the technical explanation, but who cares? The image is fantastic.

Congratulations!

Thank you.

As for technicalities, this is actually very simple.

Certain substances (called fluorophores) glow while exposed to ultraviolet light. In other words, they emit visible light. The photography technique called Ultra Violet Induced Visible Fluorescence (UVIVF) technique is based on taking pictures of this light--with a regular, not modified camera.

Fluorophores are everywhere around us: in minerals (geologists use it), plants and flowers, insects and arachnids (scorpions glow in UV like crazy!), and in objects of everyday use in which we use this feature to out advantage (highlighters!).

The macro picture in the post shows a carpenter bee (a species of bee which live in California, and happens to be black in color) in the UV light of the wavelength 365nm. The only things that glow are bee's eyes (all five: two compound eyes on the sides, and three simple eyes on the "forehead" forming a triangle). The rest of the body remains dark. Some small organic debris scattered around glows too, hence the "sparks" around.

(I tried to make the explanation as complete as possible. If the level ended up being too basic, I apologize.)

One comment: if I happened to pique your interest, and you decide to give UVIVF photography a shot, keep in mind that UV light may damage your eyes permanently! Invest in UV protection glasses (they are cheap).

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Darius

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André BARELIER
André BARELIER Forum Pro • Posts: 10,724
Re: The Black Demon

DAP MV wrote:

André BARELIER wrote:

I don't understand the technical explanation, but who cares? The image is fantastic.

Congratulations!

Thank you.

As for technicalities, this is actually very simple.

Certain substances (called fluorophores) glow while exposed to ultraviolet light. In other words, they emit visible light. The photography technique called Ultra Violet Induced Visible Fluorescence (UVIVF) technique is based on taking pictures of this light--with a regular, not modified camera.

Fluorophores are everywhere around us: in minerals (geologists use it), plants and flowers, insects and arachnids (scorpions glow in UV like crazy!), and in objects of everyday use in which we use this feature to out advantage (highlighters!).

The macro picture in the post shows a carpenter bee (a species of bee which live in California, and happens to be black in color) in the UV light of the wavelength 365nm. The only things that glow are bee's eyes (all five: two compound eyes on the sides, and three simple eyes on the "forehead" forming a triangle). The rest of the body remains dark. Some small organic debris scattered around glows too, hence the "sparks" around.

(I tried to make the explanation as complete as possible. If the level ended up being too basic, I apologize.)

One comment: if I happened to pique your interest, and you decide to give UVIVF photography a shot, keep in mind that UV light may damage your eyes permanently! Invest in UV protection glasses (they are cheap).

Thank you Darius for your explanations, and your warning. Much appreciated.

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André

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Augustin Man
Augustin Man Forum Pro • Posts: 11,042
Re: The Black Demon

Darius my friend, that image is outstandingly impressive, despite not being a spider !

Thank you for sharing and happy shooting,

Augustin

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