* Wed C&C "No Theme" Thread #689 on 2021 07 07 *

Started 5 months ago | Discussions
19andrew47
19andrew47 Forum Pro • Posts: 41,095
Re: Colour

RoelHendrickx wrote:

In the Design Museum in Ghent (exhibition "Home Stories", in collaboration with the Vitra Design Campus/Center):

A lot of colour there Roel. I played with it a bit last night but got interrupted before I could post it. To me (could be differences in monitors) it seemed a bit too bright, not a lot. I also wanted to see what if anything could be done with the view at the end of the installation.  I did lower the brightness but used Nik Color Efex Detail Enhancer on the coloured portion to bring out a bit more texture there.  It seemed to raise the brightness back to about where I started. The result is below.

It is an interesting looking art piece and your image of it is well composed.

Andrew

19andrew47
19andrew47 Forum Pro • Posts: 41,095
Re: Something different

Well done Mike.  That must have been a wonderful trip.  A great assortment of wildlife shown.

Andrew

Kumsal Regular Member • Posts: 464
Re: As if it were framed

Roel, you are right, the box does not fit into the overall picture of Leipzig Zoo.
I haven't seen a better, natural zoo so far (sure, I haven't seen everything, but some).
Definitely worth a visit: https://www.zoo-leipzig.de/en/

Kumsal Regular Member • Posts: 464
Transplanted hair

Kumsal Regular Member • Posts: 464
Re: Colour

Interleaved colors that seem to float on different levels, very interesting.

Kumsal Regular Member • Posts: 464
Re: Socially Distanced

Very good photo, which describes our situation very well at the moment.
The pandemic has changed something not only for him, but for everyone!
Didn't the flu visit us every year?

MikePDX
MikePDX Senior Member • Posts: 2,298
Re: Colour

RoelHendrickx wrote:

In the Design Museum in Ghent (exhibition "Home Stories", in collaboration with the Vitra Design Campus/Center):

Roel, I love this image. If you want to follow Andrew's approach, you could make a little story about whatever is going on in the background. You could also actually brighten that scene even further until it nearly blows out, creating a sense of other-worldlyness and mystery. This photo instantly reminded me of a story on our local Public Broadcasting channel about a local artist who "excavates" old books to make art. I hope this link works for you.  His story starts at about the 7 minute 25 second point.

Oregon Art Beat - James Allen

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Outside the box

Mike Fewster Veteran Member • Posts: 8,615
Re: Colour

RoelHendrickx wrote:

In the Design Museum in Ghent (exhibition "Home Stories", in collaboration with the Vitra Design Campus/Center):

A day in the life of the dentist?

The colours, shapes and converging circles seize our attention, but then there is something of an anti climax.  The subject that has become the focus seems mundane and too blown out. Possible interpretation? It got me thinking of The Beatles "A Day in the Life."   The ordinary, the every day, seen, maybe celebrated and psychedelic. The mystic possibilities of the everyday.

Cartier Bresson might have spent a day or two at that spot waiting for a person to jump or unfurl something. If I was having one of my more unscrupulous moments I might have tested my Photoshop skills with another subject down that tube.

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Mike Fewster
Adelaide Australia

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Re: Tropics

Chris Oly wrote:

Here in Toronto, Canada we are experiencing a record heat wave: +33C and humidex of 40. My tropical plant bicolour Mandevilla is blooming madly...

1

2

Chris, my comments reflect some personal biases I have about dof and I am well aware that it is a viewpoint not widely shared.

With close up images like these, I look at what is and what isn't in sharp focus. Both are taken close up at 150mm and  F2.8 and so have very limited dof. In both shots the petal edges are sharp while the central stamens are soft. The shapes of the petals however take our eyes straight to the centres. I feel that both shots would have more impact if that central area had been sharper.

Your Oly EM1mk3 has a feature that I would dearly love to have on my camera. You can bracket focus points and then stack the images. This would still leave the softfocus background.

Further thoughts. I much prefer 1 to 2. The extra details and lighting on the surrounding leaves and buds give a more interesting framing of the flower. The light to shadow gradations in 1are softer and more pleasing as well to my eye.

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Mike Fewster
Adelaide Australia

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Re: Outside the box

Kumsal wrote:

I'll discuss both shots here.

Original photo. I like it. Yes, for a zoo visitor a more organic home would be preferable. But we are talking about it as a photo. The dark rectangle frames and contrasts with the animal. The contrast brings out the fur. I like the head drooping over the bottom edge and breaking the line of the rectangle. I like the overall composition with the symmetry of the sides and the complete rejection of the usual rule of thirds composition. The enclosure and straight lines are making a statement of their own about zoos.

Photo 2 is quite different. The animal in a setting where we can forget it is in a zoo. I wouldn't say 2 is better, it has a different message.

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Mike Fewster
Adelaide Australia

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Re: An Odd One

19andrew47 wrote:

minniev wrote:

Because the boys (son and grandson) were in too harsh a shadow, I couldn't do much with this one other than let them go into silhouette against the background of Yosemite Falls and the Valley. I dunno. It is odd enough that I kept it. Thanks for your thoughts on the matter.

I do not know what you expect from this Paula. The image as presented is small in size and I suspect has already been processed. I had a go at 'the boys' and the result is below. I think you may be able to do more with the original than you suspect, but I could be mistaken.

Andrew

I prefer Paula's original version but I agree that it is "odd." The silhouetting of the figures has dehumanized them. They have become not real people but works of art in the landscape. It reminds me of two dimensional statues placed in a landscape. The figures look at the mountains and the fallen trees.

It has been transformed from a family photo to a statement about national parks and their value. That's a subject I feel strongly about so I give it a big nod of approval.

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Mike Fewster
Adelaide Australia

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Re: Something different

MikePDX wrote:

At first I hesitated submitting this project because it doesn't fall easily within the scope of the usual Wednesday C&C photos. But Roel encouraged me to enter it anyway, so here it is in the Related Posts section so as not to take away from your normal entries.

I have long been a proponent of telling stories using photo essays, and this project just takes that concept up a notch. I have been creating short single-subject video slide shows, set to music, from many of my photos.

This one is part travelogue and part wildlife video. It stems from my trip this past April to photograph several species of Grouse in Colorado. It is a huge file, so rather than try to post it directly, I am simply providing a link to the file on Flickr. It is about 7.5 minutes in length, and is full HD video, so its best viewed as large as you can with your audio on.

As always, I welcome and encourage any feedback you might have.

Nothing to grouse about

It is a very good thing that you didn't hesitate too long.

Re. the rules. Just  guidelines and made to be broken and especially when the breaking is of quality like this. Anyway, we get pretty predictable in the forum and a treat like this that shakes us out of the usual is hugely welcome.

So much to enjoy here. Beauty, laughs, the matching of music to the images, the rhythms. the editing skills.

A small suggestion re the editing of the opening scenes. The opening of Peer Gynt matches perfectly with still, small animals that are static and waiting for the day to get under way. I very much liked the move to larger birds and the increasing size of the incoming pelican as it approaches us with the swelling music. I felt that the final image in this pelican sequence could have been held a little longer to sync better with the music.

Then we have a change in the animals as the music signals the day is underway. The animals are more alert. The animals increase in size in step with the music. There are a couple of shots here where we jump back to smaller animals/birds and I think the visual/music matching might work better if the subjects kept growing in step with the music.

Then the music and animals change and we are off and running.

Absolutely loved it Mike.

Mike Fewster
Adelaide Australia

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Re: Socially Distanced

P3T3S wrote:

On my way through the station to catch my train home from Berlin, I came across a large pavement art-work. It was to draw attention to people whose lockdown is indefinitely extended, due to their extreme vulnerability, and can become extremely isolated. It was a portrait of a man with asthma type 2, and done using pieces of “keep your distance” tape, which we are now used to seeing stuck to the floor everywhere to indicate where to stand in queues.

Pete

First, the artwork itself. I am in awe of the skills behind this piece. The leap of imagination that was made to link the tape to the subject is the absolute essence of art and art at it's best. Then there is the image itself. Any idea of how it was made? Did the artist create it on the spot and construct it as he/she went? Did they use a computer program to create a high contrast image made of strips and then transfer this to the pavement? If the first, I am in utter awe. If the second, I am still hugely impressed.

Pete's photo does it justice. The camera position creates involving diagonals of the strips. We are close enough to read the message on the strips and understand the significance of the choice of medium for the subject. The wa also lets us see almost the complete image. To round it out, the message is driven home by the two masked figures and the linking lines in the pavement. The taped off fence restricting access to the image adds irony as well as visual continuity.

Simply brilliant.

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Mike Fewster
Adelaide Australia

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MikePDX
MikePDX Senior Member • Posts: 2,298
Re: An Odd One

minniev wrote:

Because the boys (son and grandson) were in too harsh a shadow, I couldn't do much with this one other than let them go into silhouette against the background of Yosemite Falls and the Valley. I dunno. It is odd enough that I kept it. Thanks for your thoughts on the matter.

This seems to be an image more about the place than the people.  And it was shot at a difficult time of day.  The choice to convert to  B&W in these conditions is a good one. The way I read this scene, "the boys" are helpful to give a sense of scale, and they are placed well in the frame, but they aren't the primary subject.  So it might be useful to give it the Ansel Adams treatment - darken the sky even more to emphasize those wispy clouds, and see if there is a way to bring up the waterfall.

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MikePDX
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Re: Couldn't think of a title

Mike Fewster wrote:

Best I could manage was "Waves" but that seemed not worth the effort. Bruny Island, Tasmania.

This shot holds my interest because it is so unusual.  I like the treatment of the clouds and the background waves.  A little more texture in the dune might be helpful.  But I've come back to it several times, and I must confess it isn't doing much for me.  Your original title of "Waves" hints that you might be seeing something here that I'm missing.

I did think of another possible title, though: "Gulliver's Forehead".  It feels like a Lilliputian is standing on Gulliver's eyebrow taking a shot of the top of his head.

Just my $.02.

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Group response

Mike Fewster wrote:

Best I could manage was "Waves" but that seemed not worth the effort. Bruny Island, Tasmania.

Having read the responses, I think I got This shot wrong. I liked the repetition of shapes in the dune top, the breaking waves, the hills and the clouds. The curve of the dune and especially the large sand area at the front are a mistake. A recrop. Even so, once the domed head is in your mind, it's hard to see this otherwise.

it.

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Mike Fewster
Adelaide Australia

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KeesSmeele
KeesSmeele Regular Member • Posts: 317
My sisters first grandchild

Last weekend I visited my sister. She was babysitting her first grandchild. He is a good-tempered little boy of 14 months with a very expressive look on his face. Tried to capture some facial exprecions. All photo’s were shot with the 4/3 25 mm pancake. Not the best portrait lens, but the only one available at the moment. It worked out well in my opinion.

Excitement while reading the paper with his granddad.

Paying attention.

Wondering what the fuss is all about.

Having fun with his grandma.

Concentrated on his raisins treat

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Regards,
Kees

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Chris Oly Veteran Member • Posts: 6,157
Re: Tropics

Mike Fewster wrote:

Chris, my comments reflect some personal biases I have about dof and I am well aware that it is a viewpoint not widely shared.

With close up images like these, I look at what is and what isn't in sharp focus. Both are taken close up at 150mm and F2.8 and so have very limited dof. In both shots the petal edges are sharp while the central stamens are soft. The shapes of the petals however take our eyes straight to the centres. I feel that both shots would have more impact if that central area had been sharper.

Your Oly EM1mk3 has a feature that I would dearly love to have on my camera. You can bracket focus points and then stack the images. This would still leave the softfocus background.

Further thoughts. I much prefer 1 to 2. The extra details and lighting on the surrounding leaves and buds give a more interesting framing of the flower. The light to shadow gradations in 1are softer and more pleasing as well to my eye.

Thanks very much for your comments. I tried one with stacking and one without. Very interesing results.

with

without

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Kumsal Regular Member • Posts: 464
Re: Outside the box

Thank you for your comment.
What was completely lost in the discussion is the posture of the animal.
Everyone is fixed on the box, the look of the animal and its posture are irrelevant.

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