S5 or S1

Started 5 months ago | Questions
neile2010
OP neile2010 New Member • Posts: 22
Re: The side hinged rear LCD debacle
2

vincentocat wrote:

I had both. I sold the S5 some weeks ago because I though I didn't need two L mount cameras despite the fact I used the S5 more than the S1. I kept the S1 because of the 6K and the slighty better IBIS (not for the LVF).

However after some weeks, I realized I really don't like to bring the S1, too big and too heavy. The S5 was a joy to use with light lenses like the 35mm F2 DG DN. But even with large lenses like the 24-70mm Pro and the 50mm Pro, I preferred to use the S5 because of the weight difference.

So some days ago, I found a brand new S5 + the 20-60mm for 1540€ and I bought it (I sold my first S5 with the 20-60mm for 1650€). And now I enjoy the system and my lenses again. The size and the weight of the camera is really important, more than I thought, especially if you do a lot of run and gun, if you like to bring your camera to the restaurant, for event, or on long walking trips.

I plan to keep my S1 for now but if I could exchange it for a second S5, I would not hesitate.

A bit off the topic, I have good Sony FE lenses so I will to wait for the A7IV before adding a second S5 but my hopes are low for the A7IV. I have the A7III and I tried the A7SIII, I really don't like Sony cameras. I don't like the colors, the ergonomic, the video quality, the IBIS and more ...

thank you Vinvce,  I was swaying to the S1, but you views are very much appreciated, from a G9 user to a S5 could be easier..... thanks again

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neile2010
OP neile2010 New Member • Posts: 22
Re: S5 or S1

Dr Hal wrote:

I went from the G9 to the S5 and it was a very easy transitiion. To me the size of the camera was important. The S5 is the same size and basically the same configuration and menu system. The lenses are larger but still very comfortable. I did recently buy the 70-300 to use at my granddaughter's Lacrosse games. It is considered a small FF telephoto but it is large. The S1 was just too large for me to consider. I do not enjoy lugging a large camera with a large lens. I am very happy with the S5. The files are wonderful in PP, the high ISO is unbelievable to me after using m43 for 10 years. I think that you will be happier with the S5.

Hal

thank you Hal...

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rick in vegas Senior Member • Posts: 1,031
Re: S5 or S1
2

Don’t agree on that. Panasonic color science is very good. Also the single point AF is one of the fastest and accurate on the market. If just pics I would think S5. Same sensor as S1. Much lighter with some compromises.

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Daft Punk Contributing Member • Posts: 900
Re: The side hinged rear LCD debacle

Completely agree !!

MOD Tom Caldwell Forum Pro • Posts: 43,396
Re: The side hinged rear LCD debacle
1

I belong to the same club David, for all the same reasons. The tilter is like the family cat - no bother really until you give it some attention and then it purrs. The side hinge is more like the family dog - demands attention all the time and can be a lot of fun if you wish that level of companionship. Both serve a purpose.

I suspect that the side hinge is more popular with those who make the lcd their primary go-to for making images. The tilt is more “use it only when you really need it”.

Example given of use with gimbal. Obviously this is a specialised use for a purpose and if you don’t really use a gimbal then there is nothing wrong with the tilt.  But would you ever use a gimbal and the evf together?

A couple of surveys some time ago on the M4/3 forum gave similar answers

40% really like tilt

40% really like side hinge

20% don’t care

Therefore the manufactures have to figure out just which 20% of the market to upset.

I only have one side hinge lcd camera body - the G9 - which of course is a very good camera in its own right.  But in order to stop a brain snap I just pretend that it is a fixed set outwards screen and I get by with that.  But I never-ever fold it inwards to “protect the lcd” as the resultant in-use fiddles are maddening.

One thing seems for sure - that a RF-style body coupled  with a side hinged lcd is a disaster on the market. Vide: Panasonic GX8 and Olympus Pen-F.  It will be interesting to see how the paragons of side hinged lcd (Sony) get on with their A7c camera. Seems quite good, but I passed on it as well as the S5 because of that infernal side hinge.

I don’t expect others to agree. But maybe if the manufacturers offered a hinge mechanism that optionally good take either side hinge or tilt then the matter of how many liked each type could be settled and everyone made happy?

Although the S1/S1R double-tilt is ok I really thing that “tilters” like quiet simplicity and are more than happy with landscape mode tilt only.  I think that tilt is really “occasional need”compared to side hinge which becomes the major capture interface of those that prefer it.

Those that asked for more complex tilt-inclusive hinges I really think are closet side hingers trying to be helpful.

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Tom Caldwell

georgehudetz Veteran Member • Posts: 5,326
Re: The side hinged rear LCD debacle
1

Tom Caldwell wrote:

Those that asked for more complex tilt-inclusive hinges I really think are closet side hingers trying to be helpful.

You might be right, or maybe not. But I will say this - even though I rarely need to tilt while in portrait mode - basically, a small percentage of my landscape/astro shots while on a tripod - I will not buy a new camera that does not allow me to tilt in both landscape AND portrait mode. It's not that I am heavily reliant on it. It's just that, now that there are two well developed solutions for this, I see no reason not to include one or the other in any camera offering going forward.

Perhaps somebody will make a rangefinder body with a fixed screen, or a screen that only rotates down. Perhaps there is a sufficiently sized market for that. If so, more power to you. It would be great if we could all get what we want. But to me, that seems like a step backward.

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Archiver Veteran Member • Posts: 3,720
Re: S5 or S1
1

After months of deliberation and watching and reading reviews of both cameras, I went with the S5. Why?

  • smaller size and lower weight, like the G9 I'm used to
  • two SD card slots, no need to buy an expensive XQD card or rely on just one SD card slot
  • improved autofocus, especially for people
  • fully articulating screen, good for angled shooting and video interviews
  • battery is backwards compatible with the G9 and GH cameras, S! is not
  • no need to buy V-Log upgrade package as all high end video codecs already built in
  • lower price than S1
  • same image quality as the S1 in stills and video

Things the S1 has over the S5:

  • 11fps burst vs 7fps burst - I shoot action with the G9 at 10fps, and much slower cameras, and the high burst rate results in a lot more pictures, making it a longer process to find the right moment
  • flip screen is in line with the camera body - this is neither here nor there for me
  • much bigger and higher resolution EVF - I'm used to shooting with lower res EVF's and the S5's is fine
  • heavier body and slightly better IBIS - I shoot a lot of handheld video, but I often use the shoulder strap to help stabilize the camera anyway
  • longer battery life - nothing that a second battery doesn't solve
  • LCD top panel - to be honest, I love this in the G9, and I would have liked this in the S5
  • more buttons on the back and front - I'm very used to the multitude of customizable function buttons on the G9, and going to the S5 was a slight adjustment. It's still very useable, though
  • thicker and better grip - this is another issue I've found with the handling of the S5. Full frame cameras will usually involve lenses much heavier than their m43 counterparts, and the G9's grip is the best I've felt in any camera including the Canon 5D Mark II, Panasonic GH4 and others. The S5's grip is noticeably smaller and thinner than the G9's, and I will probably get a battery grip to make it handle better.
  • full resolution 5.9k video - I don't have much use for that resolution, so it's a moot point
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Archiver Veteran Member • Posts: 3,720
Re: S5 or S1

brucefulton wrote:

I'm surprised no one has mentioned that you can get the s5 with the 24-105 as the kit lens from several dealers. I think this is the much better choice than the 20-60 standard kit lens, and you'll save by buying it the 24-105 as the kit choice over the body and lens separately. That's what I did, and I'm happy with the choice. I'll be adding the Sigma 100-400 and one of the sigma wide zooms to round it out soon. Check it out.

The S5 was recently on sale over this way, and I got mine plus 20-60 for about $800 less than the full price S5 body alone. And there's a free Sigma 45mm on the way as a promotion from Panasonic Australia, too.

While I would have liked to get the 24-105, the price difference was just too much, and I already have the Sigma 24-105mm f4 in Canon EF mount, along with the Sigma MC21. When I update the firmware I expect it to perform with reasonable effectiveness. Having bought the Sigma to go with my G9 on Speedbooster only a few months ago, I'm loathe to spend even more on a lens that can only be used on the S5, and not on the m43 and Canon cameras I already have.

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david8732 Regular Member • Posts: 303
Re: The side hinged rear LCD debacle
1

Tom Caldwell -

“One thing seems for sure - that a RF-style body coupled with a side hinged lcd is a disaster on the market. Vide: Panasonic GX8 and Olympus Pen-F. It will be interesting to see how the paragons of side hinged lcd (Sony) get on with their A7c camera. Seems quite good, but I passed on it as well as the S5 because of that infernal side hinge.”

This so true.

Plus it’s getting to the point now where when I see the introduction of a new camera the very first thing I look at is the rear LCD mechanism. If it’s a side hinged selfie screen I completely blank that camera, it’s dead to me.

I think Canon are a disgrace here, they seem to be only ever going to be using the side hinged going forward, they do not care about offering us a choice. Yet when I bring this up all I get back is ‘They are the best selling camera brand.’ Mmm just think how many more they’d sell if they gave us a choice.

Anyway, my S1 is sublime. Built like a tank with great handling…. And that beautiful, swift, inconspicuous rear LCD gives me great joy 😊

reinhard becker Regular Member • Posts: 146
Re: The side hinged rear LCD debacle

david8732 wrote:

.

Plus it’s getting to the point now where when I see the introduction of a new camera the very first thing I look at is the rear LCD mechanism. If it’s a side hinged selfie screen I completely blank that camera, it’s dead to me.

Like Tom said, what 40% of the customers should be upset?

when I decided to enter fullframe again last year I also took a look to Nikon and Sony. I had Canon in the past, but could now decide free.

With Nikon and Sony there where only the typical one way tliters, so these 2 systems where sorted out at once! Canon was fine and Panasonic offered the double way tilt (s5 was not announced at that time). So I decided for Panasonic because of price (S1R was only half the price of the R5) and the availability of new Sigma lenses for mirrorless.

If Panasonic had not offered the special 2 way tilt I had made my decision for Canon. Just because of the display…

I vote for the other 40%… 😇

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Reinhard
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ChloeScan Regular Member • Posts: 110
Re: S5 or S1

Archiver wrote:

After months of deliberation and watching and reading reviews of both cameras, I went with the S5. Why?

  • smaller size and lower weight, like the G9 I'm used to
  • two SD card slots, no need to buy an expensive XQD card or rely on just one SD card slot
  • improved autofocus, especially for people
  • fully articulating screen, good for angled shooting and video interviews
  • battery is backwards compatible with the G9 and GH cameras, S! is not
  • no need to buy V-Log upgrade package as all high end video codecs already built in
  • lower price than S1
  • same image quality as the S1 in stills and video

Things the S1 has over the S5:

  • 11fps burst vs 7fps burst - I shoot action with the G9 at 10fps, and much slower cameras, and the high burst rate results in a lot more pictures, making it a longer process to find the right moment
  • flip screen is in line with the camera body - this is neither here nor there for me
  • much bigger and higher resolution EVF - I'm used to shooting with lower res EVF's and the S5's is fine
  • heavier body and slightly better IBIS - I shoot a lot of handheld video, but I often use the shoulder strap to help stabilize the camera anyway
  • longer battery life - nothing that a second battery doesn't solve
  • LCD top panel - to be honest, I love this in the G9, and I would have liked this in the S5
  • more buttons on the back and front - I'm very used to the multitude of customizable function buttons on the G9, and going to the S5 was a slight adjustment. It's still very useable, though
  • thicker and better grip - this is another issue I've found with the handling of the S5. Full frame cameras will usually involve lenses much heavier than their m43 counterparts, and the G9's grip is the best I've felt in any camera including the Canon 5D Mark II, Panasonic GH4 and others. The S5's grip is noticeably smaller and thinner than the G9's, and I will probably get a battery grip to make it handle better.
  • full resolution 5.9k video - I don't have much use for that resolution, so it's a moot point

After reading all that I’m staggered you didn’t go with the S1, you pointed out all the huge advantages yourself here. And they’re basically the same price.

Archiver Veteran Member • Posts: 3,720
Re: S5 or S1

ChloeScan wrote:

Archiver wrote:

After months of deliberation and watching and reading reviews of both cameras, I went with the S5. Why?

  • smaller size and lower weight, like the G9 I'm used to
  • two SD card slots, no need to buy an expensive XQD card or rely on just one SD card slot
  • improved autofocus, especially for people
  • fully articulating screen, good for angled shooting and video interviews
  • battery is backwards compatible with the G9 and GH cameras, S1 is not
  • no need to buy V-Log upgrade package as all high end video codecs already built in
  • lower price than S1
  • same image quality as the S1 in stills and video

Things the S1 has over the S5:

  • 11fps burst vs 7fps burst - I shoot action with the G9 at 10fps, and much slower cameras, and the high burst rate results in a lot more pictures, making it a longer process to find the right moment
  • flip screen is in line with the camera body - this is neither here nor there for me
  • much bigger and higher resolution EVF - I'm used to shooting with lower res EVF's and the S5's is fine
  • heavier body and slightly better IBIS - I shoot a lot of handheld video, but I often use the shoulder strap to help stabilize the camera anyway
  • longer battery life - nothing that a second battery doesn't solve
  • LCD top panel - to be honest, I love this in the G9, and I would have liked this in the S5
  • more buttons on the back and front - I'm very used to the multitude of customizable function buttons on the G9, and going to the S5 was a slight adjustment. It's still very useable, though
  • thicker and better grip - this is another issue I've found with the handling of the S5. Full frame cameras will usually involve lenses much heavier than their m43 counterparts, and the G9's grip is the best I've felt in any camera including the Canon 5D Mark II, Panasonic GH4 and others. The S5's grip is noticeably smaller and thinner than the G9's, and I will probably get a battery grip to make it handle better.
  • full resolution 5.9k video - I don't have much use for that resolution, so it's a moot point

After reading all that I’m staggered you didn’t go with the S1, you pointed out all the huge advantages yourself here. And they’re basically the same price.

I see where you're coming from, so let me explain a bit better.

Light weight and small size is very important to me, especially for a camera that I might carry for a day of shooting, or on a job that requires me to carry two bodies at least. The S1 is just over a kilo with battery, 200g heavier than the 5D Mark II, which I gladly stopped carrying on personal shoots after I got smaller, lighter cameras. While I used to have the 5D + 24-105L and 35L in a bag most days, I couldn't go back to it after using cameras like the Olympus E-M5 and Leica M9.

The use of two SD card slots is also important. On a job, I might be in the middle of an athletic event without the ability to change the card until after the match is over.

I wasn't aware of the S5's grip until I bought it. That's probably the worst thing difference between the S5 and S1. I much prefer the grip of the G9, which is similar to the S1.

The price difference is considerable in Australia. The S5 body alone retails for around AUD $3200, street price of $2800 right now. The S1 retails for $3700 with a usual street price of $3200. I was able to get my S5 with 20-60mm for $2600. And buying a S1 would mean having to buy a XQD card which is at least $220 over here, as well as the v-log upgrade for another $300.

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ChloeScan Regular Member • Posts: 110
Re: S5 or S1
1

Archiver wrote:

ChloeScan wrote:

Archiver wrote:

After months of deliberation and watching and reading reviews of both cameras, I went with the S5. Why?

  • smaller size and lower weight, like the G9 I'm used to
  • two SD card slots, no need to buy an expensive XQD card or rely on just one SD card slot
  • improved autofocus, especially for people
  • fully articulating screen, good for angled shooting and video interviews
  • battery is backwards compatible with the G9 and GH cameras, S1 is not
  • no need to buy V-Log upgrade package as all high end video codecs already built in
  • lower price than S1
  • same image quality as the S1 in stills and video

Things the S1 has over the S5:

  • 11fps burst vs 7fps burst - I shoot action with the G9 at 10fps, and much slower cameras, and the high burst rate results in a lot more pictures, making it a longer process to find the right moment
  • flip screen is in line with the camera body - this is neither here nor there for me
  • much bigger and higher resolution EVF - I'm used to shooting with lower res EVF's and the S5's is fine
  • heavier body and slightly better IBIS - I shoot a lot of handheld video, but I often use the shoulder strap to help stabilize the camera anyway
  • longer battery life - nothing that a second battery doesn't solve
  • LCD top panel - to be honest, I love this in the G9, and I would have liked this in the S5
  • more buttons on the back and front - I'm very used to the multitude of customizable function buttons on the G9, and going to the S5 was a slight adjustment. It's still very useable, though
  • thicker and better grip - this is another issue I've found with the handling of the S5. Full frame cameras will usually involve lenses much heavier than their m43 counterparts, and the G9's grip is the best I've felt in any camera including the Canon 5D Mark II, Panasonic GH4 and others. The S5's grip is noticeably smaller and thinner than the G9's, and I will probably get a battery grip to make it handle better.
  • full resolution 5.9k video - I don't have much use for that resolution, so it's a moot point

After reading all that I’m staggered you didn’t go with the S1, you pointed out all the huge advantages yourself here. And they’re basically the same price.

I see where you're coming from, so let me explain a bit better.

Light weight and small size is very important to me, especially for a camera that I might carry for a day of shooting, or on a job that requires me to carry two bodies at least. The S1 is just over a kilo with battery, 200g heavier than the 5D Mark II, which I gladly stopped carrying on personal shoots after I got smaller, lighter cameras. While I used to have the 5D + 24-105L and 35L in a bag most days, I couldn't go back to it after using cameras like the Olympus E-M5 and Leica M9.

The use of two SD card slots is also important. On a job, I might be in the middle of an athletic event without the ability to change the card until after the match is over.

I wasn't aware of the S5's grip until I bought it. That's probably the worst thing difference between the S5 and S1. I much prefer the grip of the G9, which is similar to the S1.

The price difference is considerable in Australia. The S5 body alone retails for around AUD $3200, street price of $2800 right now. The S1 retails for $3700 with a usual street price of $3200. I was able to get my S5 with 20-60mm for $2600. And buying a S1 would mean having to buy a XQD card which is at least $220 over here, as well as the v-log upgrade for another $300.

Interesting, thanks.

The price difference is a lot less here in the UK. The S5/20-60 is only £300 less than an S1/24-105.

Enjoy your new camera 🙂

LuxShots
LuxShots Contributing Member • Posts: 806
Re: S5 or S1
5

Greg Ohio wrote:

neile2010 wrote:

hi all,

I am putting in my G9 , exchanging to full Frame....

I am slightly hesitant , should I go for the S5 with 20-60 , or the S1 with 24-105 f4.

I have the S5 and the 24-105. I wouldn't want the S1 because of its size. The 24-105 is a really nice lens, but is big and heavy. I wish I had the option of the 20-60.

If you're going to add a longer telephoto, which you choose could influence the choice of midrange lens. If you go with the 70-300, the 20-60 is a valid option. If you go with the 100-400, you might prefer the 24-105 to avoid the large gap between 60 and 100.

I just did a client shoot with my S1 and S1H, using the 20-60 and the 24-105. At every focal length, the 24-105 if significantly sharper than the 20-60.

Simply no comparison.

Additionally, you also have the Dual I.S. capability with the 24-105, which makes a significant difference with many photos.

Take a look at this photo I shot with the 24-105 and the S1H. The vertical stabilization is automatically enabled as soon as a user pans.

S1H and Panasonic 24-105 f/4

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MOD Tom Caldwell Forum Pro • Posts: 43,396
Re: The lcd hinge - a personal explanation
2

georgehudetz wrote:

Tom Caldwell wrote:

Since cameras that are larger really need to use the evf more and I tend to use it. My style rarely requires working from the lcd. Therefore fooling around with swivel-tilt-swivel-it back again really annoys me.

If you rarely use the LCD, then on the S5 you can stow it with the screen facing in. Now it's protected and never comes on, helping with battery life. But, when you want to use it, now it's just a single 180 degree rotation to pull it out.

For me the only time I use the LCD is when it's on a tripod. So, regardless of the orientation of the camera, I just flip out the screen and, if I'm in landscape orientation, rotate it a little so it's pointing up at me, and I'm good to go. I'm still getting used to the S5, so take this with a grain of salt, but I think I'll find this easier than the S1R's screen as now I don't have to find that little slider switch if I want to shoot in portrait orientation.

As long as we have a choice.

A deeper appreciation of what motivates me - it is not a casual dislike.

I have always switched off my auto-playback (as well as all sounds). I don’t really wish to draw attention to myself as I like “normal-look” portraits that are not posed and it is always better when your subjects “forget” that you have a camera and are using it.

Therefore I use playback on-demand rather than on-auto. Furthermore since Panasonic’s excellent touch screen interface then why not use this valuable tool?

Also I have always had my lcd screens face outwards and never really had a screen damage issue. With respect I wonder just how rough with your gear we need to be to envisage a screen damage enough that we need to always fold our lcd inwards.

Therefore for on demand playback as a serious review exercise I need it outwards 100%. Otherwise it is a series of fold out, twist, fold back in again, repeat …. Just in case the lcd might get damaged.

The other reason is that Panasonic provides a happy little extra for MF purposes. Mostly with legacy MF lenses. Screen magnified to check focus, soft press - the full screen appears to check composition, thumb dab anywhere on the lcd and the magnification returns to re-check focus.

Ok - now there is a case for leaving the lcd forever facing outwards, but wait ….now we need a sudden tilt of the lcd of an overhead or low level shot. Now it is fold out, twist and adjust tilt, and capture - then reverse the procedure. A simple tilt works much better, with little delay and almost part of the auto-thought process. …. And I am not going to walk about like a dork with my lcd hanging and draw attention to me photographic activities.

I don’t ever “do video”.

There are different strokes for different photographers - the side hinge lcd drive lcd drives me to insanity if I need to use the lcd in a stop-start-stop manner.

But I can understand why some relish the side hinged lcd, but I avoid such cameras if I can.

I did not buy another Canon or Olympus camera body after they made side hinged lcd a standard fitting across the range. I have not gone back to Canon since the RF mount for that same reason. The Sony A7c interested me until I quickly found that it had a side hinged lcd. I also gave the S5 a miss for the same reason and if the almost inevitable SX1 (RF-Style body) has a side hinged lcd I will not be interested and my S1 can be made to last almost forever.

But I am sure that all these companies manage fine without my business and are not in the least perturbed by my comments.

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Tom Caldwell

MOD Tom Caldwell Forum Pro • Posts: 43,396
Re: The side hinged rear LCD debacle

reinhard becker wrote:

david8732 wrote:

.

Plus it’s getting to the point now where when I see the introduction of a new camera the very first thing I look at is the rear LCD mechanism. If it’s a side hinged selfie screen I completely blank that camera, it’s dead to me.

Like Tom said, what 40% of the customers should be upset?

when I decided to enter fullframe again last year I also took a look to Nikon and Sony. I had Canon in the past, but could now decide free.

With Nikon and Sony there where only the typical one way tliters, so these 2 systems where sorted out at once! Canon was fine and Panasonic offered the double way tilt (s5 was not announced at that time). So I decided for Panasonic because of price (S1R was only half the price of the R5) and the availability of new Sigma lenses for mirrorless.

If Panasonic had not offered the special 2 way tilt I had made my decision for Canon. Just because of the display…

I vote for the other 40%… 😇

Delicious - either way the manufacturers risk the ire of 40% of the camera market and just hope that they can win the recalcitrant around because there is no other choice.

Those 20% that don’t  care about the type of hinge don’t figure in the marketing decision.

At least Panasonic offer some choice.   But I would hope that they understand that the S5 popularity is more to do with price and compact size  and not because they have won over the other 40%

They all have to realise that when it gets to the stage that all camera bodies are pretty good it gets to the stage where the type of lcd screen hinge becomes the defining point of buying or not buying and choosing something else with a lcd hinge that attracts.

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Tom Caldwell

georgehudetz Veteran Member • Posts: 5,326
Re: The lcd hinge - a personal explanation

Tom Caldwell wrote:

georgehudetz wrote:

Tom Caldwell wrote:

Since cameras that are larger really need to use the evf more and I tend to use it. My style rarely requires working from the lcd. Therefore fooling around with swivel-tilt-swivel-it back again really annoys me.

If you rarely use the LCD, then on the S5 you can stow it with the screen facing in. Now it's protected and never comes on, helping with battery life. But, when you want to use it, now it's just a single 180 degree rotation to pull it out.

For me the only time I use the LCD is when it's on a tripod. So, regardless of the orientation of the camera, I just flip out the screen and, if I'm in landscape orientation, rotate it a little so it's pointing up at me, and I'm good to go. I'm still getting used to the S5, so take this with a grain of salt, but I think I'll find this easier than the S1R's screen as now I don't have to find that little slider switch if I want to shoot in portrait orientation.

As long as we have a choice.

A deeper appreciation of what motivates me - it is not a casual dislike.

I have always switched off my auto-playback (as well as all sounds). I don’t really wish to draw attention to myself as I like “normal-look” portraits that are not posed and it is always better when your subjects “forget” that you have a camera and are using it.

Therefore I use playback on-demand rather than on-auto. Furthermore since Panasonic’s excellent touch screen interface then why not use this valuable tool?

Also I have always had my lcd screens face outwards and never really had a screen damage issue. With respect I wonder just how rough with your gear we need to be to envisage a screen damage enough that we need to always fold our lcd inwards.

Therefore for on demand playback as a serious review exercise I need it outwards 100%. Otherwise it is a series of fold out, twist, fold back in again, repeat …. Just in case the lcd might get damaged.

The other reason is that Panasonic provides a happy little extra for MF purposes. Mostly with legacy MF lenses. Screen magnified to check focus, soft press - the full screen appears to check composition, thumb dab anywhere on the lcd and the magnification returns to re-check focus.

Ok - now there is a case for leaving the lcd forever facing outwards, but wait ….now we need a sudden tilt of the lcd of an overhead or low level shot. Now it is fold out, twist and adjust tilt, and capture - then reverse the procedure. A simple tilt works much better, with little delay and almost part of the auto-thought process. …. And I am not going to walk about like a dork with my lcd hanging and draw attention to me photographic activities.

I don’t ever “do video”.

There are different strokes for different photographers - the side hinge lcd drive lcd drives me to insanity if I need to use the lcd in a stop-start-stop manner.

But I can understand why some relish the side hinged lcd, but I avoid such cameras if I can.

I did not buy another Canon or Olympus camera body after they made side hinged lcd a standard fitting across the range. I have not gone back to Canon since the RF mount for that same reason. The Sony A7c interested me until I quickly found that it had a side hinged lcd. I also gave the S5 a miss for the same reason and if the almost inevitable SX1 (RF-Style body) has a side hinged lcd I will not be interested and my S1 can be made to last almost forever.

But I am sure that all these companies manage fine without my business and are not in the least perturbed by my comments.

Thanks for the added thoughts, Tom.  I do appreciate reading them.

As a side note, I recently spent a weekend hunting wildflowers in Colorado.  Over two days, I was on the trail for, I think, 14 hours, with the S5.  Rear screen was in the "stowed" position the entire time.  Never used a tripod, and thus never used the rear screen.  I was able to shoot 840 images on one battery - and that's a total of 1680 files since I shoot raw + JPEG.  So, another advantage of stowing the screen.

Yes you can simply turn off the screen if you want, but it's nice to just flip it out to turn it on, as opposed to fiddling with a tiny button with tri-state logic. 

I do agree with your comments about keeping the camera quiet, as well as the likelihood of damaging an exposed screen.

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Off The Mark Veteran Member • Posts: 5,329
Re: The lcd hinge - a personal explanation

Tom Caldwell wrote:

I don’t ever “do video”.

I know you don't.

But just to put additional emphasis on your point (as someone who does "do video"), the fully articulating screen is only really helpful in LIMITED instances as far as I can think of, such as shooting a vlog / selfie (not something one would really want to do with an S1-series of cameras anyway), or when on a motorized gimbal (as the roll motor could block view of a tilting screen) and again, due to the weight and size of the S1, not something one would really want to do (don't ask me how I know), and I guess if you were going to be holding the camera overhead and needed the screen to face down further than the screen on the S1 / S1R can tilt downward.

So I am much like you; for stills, the tilt screen of the S1 / S1R is near perfect. And the fully articulating screen of the S5 often can be frustrating.

Which makes me surprised that the survey said 40% of users preferred the fully articulating screen. I guess maybe there are a lot more people shooting selfies / vlogs than I had imagined???

Anyway, the tilting screen (and the EVF additionally) on the S1 is really, really good.

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Archiver Veteran Member • Posts: 3,720
Re: The lcd hinge - a personal explanation

Off The Mark wrote:

Tom Caldwell wrote:

I don’t ever “do video”.

I know you don't.

But just to put additional emphasis on your point (as someone who does "do video"), the fully articulating screen is only really helpful in LIMITED instances as far as I can think of, such as shooting a vlog / selfie (not something one would really want to do with an S1-series of cameras anyway), or when on a motorized gimbal (as the roll motor could block view of a tilting screen) and again, due to the weight and size of the S1, not something one would really want to do (don't ask me how I know), and I guess if you were going to be holding the camera overhead and needed the screen to face down further than the screen on the S1 / S1R can tilt downward.

As someone who shoots video for a living and regularly conducts interviews, a fully articulating screen is essential. Even the S1's solution of having the screen tilt to the right won't help if you have the place the camera on the right of the subject. Many times, I don't have the luxury of repositioning a subject or camera in a different spot, I have to go with what is available. Secondly, it's useful to have the subject positioned on the left or right of the image to give visual variety across multiple interviews.

While I could use an external monitor, that adds what is often unnecessary and cumbersome weight, extra batteries and cables, etc. This is one reason why I chose the S5 over the S1, another being the huge price jump to the S1H.

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Off The Mark Veteran Member • Posts: 5,329
Re: The lcd hinge - a personal explanation

Archiver wrote:

Off The Mark wrote:

Tom Caldwell wrote:

I don’t ever “do video”.

I know you don't.

But just to put additional emphasis on your point (as someone who does "do video"), the fully articulating screen is only really helpful in LIMITED instances as far as I can think of, such as shooting a vlog / selfie (not something one would really want to do with an S1-series of cameras anyway), or when on a motorized gimbal (as the roll motor could block view of a tilting screen) and again, due to the weight and size of the S1, not something one would really want to do (don't ask me how I know), and I guess if you were going to be holding the camera overhead and needed the screen to face down further than the screen on the S1 / S1R can tilt downward.

As someone who shoots video for a living and regularly conducts interviews, a fully articulating screen is essential. Even the S1's solution of having the screen tilt to the right won't help if you have the place the camera on the right of the subject. Many times, I don't have the luxury of repositioning a subject or camera in a different spot, I have to go with what is available. Secondly, it's useful to have the subject positioned on the left or right of the image to give visual variety across multiple interviews.

While I could use an external monitor, that adds what is often unnecessary and cumbersome weight, extra batteries and cables, etc. This is one reason why I chose the S5 over the S1, another being the huge price jump to the S1H.

Good points.

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