LR Tips for GFX Files

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Greg7579
Greg7579 Forum Pro • Posts: 13,506
LR Tips for GFX Files
4

There are a lot of new GFX shooters with this new "bargain-priced" GFX 100s.

Those of us who have been shooting GFX for years know a few common things about how Adobe handles GFX files. Add your tips and tricks here:

1. Chris is adamant about this one and has reported it to Adobe many times. The LR default for sharpening is way too high at 40 and should be 31. I almost always change the sharpening to 30 to 33.

2. Chris is adamant about this one too and has reported it to Adobe.  The LR default is always way too high on the tint (to the right towards magenta) on the bottom WB slider. It is not subtle. It almost always need to be moved to the left 6 to 12 points on the number scale.

3. In my experience of using LR to develop probably 20,000 (much more probably) GFX RAF raw files, almost any file (especially landscapes and city scenes) benefit with a little dose of Vibrance and Clarity. Not so for portraits right Chris?

4. If you post files on Flickr or DPR, go ahead and export them as full-size JPEGs at 90% quality. I learned this over many series of trial and error and lessons from Jim two years ago. That will get them down into the 35 to 45 MB range. 90% quality has really no discernable difference from 100% and some would say to go as low as 80%.

On file-size: Why downsize the files from full size? Leave image sizing alone and at full size and let the incredible JPEG algorithms do their work. Of course you can size for printing or for specific purposes on the web as desired and dramatically downsize the dimensions if you want, but leave the files full size for posting on DPR or Flickr (unless you are a pro trying to sell images and don't want people to have the huge file).

5. GFX files will amaze you with there mailability in LR. The ability to left shadows seems almost endless. One must be careful not to even the scene out too much. Like Left Eye, Chris, Jim and Farz have told me many times - go easy on the shadow-lifting. Leave some dramatic shadows that add richness to the scene.

6. Blown highlights might be forever blown (as they say), but let me tell you that the highlights slider works wonders with GFX files as you move it to the left and recover those blinkies.

7. Go easy on the luminance slider. You don't often need that noise reduction work and it can smooth out in a bad way some very fine distant detail that GFX files are famous for.

8. GFX files have an amazing look and the fine detail just blows you away. Experiment with the new Texture slider. It adds some oomph to tree trunks, brick walls and stone paths in an interesting way, especially with B&W conversion.

9. Try B&W 03 on GFX files with lots of contrast. There are 17 B&W profile types to choose from.

What are your favorite tips?

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matteroner
matteroner Senior Member • Posts: 1,174
Re: LR Tips for GFX Files
1

Good tips.

My tip.

If you shoot jpg and raw you can easily get that jpg profile to be applied to the raw image by selecting camera settings under the develop settings on import. This gives you a great starting point imo.  You can always save it as a virtual copy and revert another to the adobe version. But I've had images where I edit like crazy and can't get back to what the original jpg looked like.  This way I can start there, but still have the raw flexibility.

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JimKasson
MOD JimKasson Forum Pro • Posts: 33,846
Re: LR Tips for GFX Files
4

Greg7579 wrote:

There are a lot of new GFX shooters with this new "bargain-priced" GFX 100s.

Those of us who have been shooting GFX for years know a few common things about how Adobe handles GFX files. Add your tips and tricks here:

1. Chris is adamant about this one. and has reported it to Adobe many times. The LR default for sharpening is way to high at 40 and should be 31. I almost always change the sharpening to 30 to 33.

I change it to 20 to 25 for openers.

2. Chris is adamant about this one too and has reported it to Adobe. LR is always way too high on the tint (to the right towards magenta) on the bottom WB slider. It is not subtle. It almost always need to be moved to the left 6 to 12 points on the number scale.

3. In my experience of using LR to develop probably 20,000 (much more probably) GFX RAF raw files, almost any file (especially landscapes and city scenes) benefit with a little dose of Vibrance and Clarity.

Not my experience. In fact, I use negative clarity sometimes.

Not so for portraits right Chris?

4. If you post files on Flickr or DPR, go ahead and export them as full-size JPEGs at 90% quality. I learned this over many series of trial and error and lessons from Jim two years ago. That will get them down into the 35 to 45 MB range. 90% quality has really no discernable difference from 100% and some would say to go as low as 80%. Why downsize the files from full size? Leave image sizing alone and at full size and let the incredible algorithms do their work. Of course you can size for printing or for specific purposes on the web as desired and dramatically downsize the dimensions if you want, but leave the files full size for posting on DPR or Flickr (unless you are a pro trying to sell images and don't want people to have the huge file).

5. GFX files will amaze you with there mailability in LR. The ability to left shadows seems almost endless.

I don't have a problem with right shadows, either.

One must be careful not to even the scene out too much. Like Left Eye, Chris, Jim and Farz have told me many times - go easy on the shadow-lifting. Leave some dramatic shadows that add richness to the scene.

Yep.

6. Blown highlights might be forever blown (as they say), but let me tell you that the highlights slider works wonders with GFX files as you move it to the left and recover those blinkies.

Lr blinkies depend on the developed image, not the raw file. Lr at default setting will show blinkies when no channel in the raw file is blown. Lr can recover blown highlight convincingly if only one raw channel is blown. Not so much for two, and all bets are off for four.

7. Go easy on the luminance slider. You don't often need that noise reduction work and it can smooth out in a bad way some very fine distant detail that GFX files are famous for.

Unless you like the plastic look.

8. GFX files have an amazing look and the fine detail just blows you away. Experiment with the new Texture slider. It adds some oomph to tree trunks, brick walls and stone paths in an interesting way, especially with B&W conversion.

9. Try B&W 03 on GFX files with lots of contrast. There are 17 B&W profile types to choose from.

What are your favorite tips?

Have enough RAM so there's no swapping,

Use a gray card for white balance.

Go get coffee while Lr generates preview images.

Select show only unflagged images when culling, and use reject and pick, which makes them disappear.

Lr is a proxy editor. What you see on the screen is not what you'll get on export, though it's usually pretty close. In particular, artifacts that you see on screen may not appear in the export.

For compositing, send the selected images to Ps as layers. A great time saver.

Jim

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spilla Contributing Member • Posts: 566
Re: LR Tips for GFX Files

Greg these are great -- I added a few comments from my experience.

Greg7579 wrote:

There are a lot of new GFX shooters with this new "bargain-priced" GFX 100s.

Those of us who have been shooting GFX for years know a few common things about how Adobe handles GFX files. Add your tips and tricks here:

1. Chris is adamant about this one and has reported it to Adobe many times. The LR default for sharpening is way too high at 40 and should be 31. I almost always change the sharpening to 30 to 33.

Agree -- when I'm shooting at optimal apertures on fuji lenses sometimes I have sharpening as low as 20-25.

5. GFX files will amaze you with there mailability in LR. The ability to left shadows seems almost endless. One must be careful not to even the scene out too much. Like Left Eye, Chris, Jim and Farz have told me many times - go easy on the shadow-lifting. Leave some dramatic shadows that add richness to the scene.

Agree -- the worst thing you can do is follow the editing workflow of a certain youtube photographer and start by doing highlights -100 and shadows +100. Yuck.

6. Blown highlights might be forever blown (as they say), but let me tell you that the highlights slider works wonders with GFX files as you move it to the left and recover those blinkies.

If you want to make it look even more natural, you can try using range mask and only apply shadow lowering to the highlights.

7. Go easy on the luminance slider. You don't often need that noise reduction work and it can smooth out in a bad way some very fine distant detail that GFX files are famous for.

I also turn down the color NR on my clean looking files! Though if you drop the highlights hard, you will get significant color noise in the sky.

8. GFX files have an amazing look and the fine detail just blows you away. Experiment with the new Texture slider. It adds some oomph to tree trunks, brick walls and stone paths in an interesting way, especially with B&W conversion.

I often add texture +5 to my landscape images, gives an effect of large-detail sharpening.

Manzur Fahim
Manzur Fahim Veteran Member • Posts: 3,552
Re: LR Tips for GFX Files
1

Greg7579 wrote:

There are a lot of new GFX shooters with this new "bargain-priced" GFX 100s.

Those of us who have been shooting GFX for years know a few common things about how Adobe handles GFX files. Add your tips and tricks here:

1. Chris is adamant about this one and has reported it to Adobe many times. The LR default for sharpening is way too high at 40 and should be 31. I almost always change the sharpening to 30 to 33.

1. I created profiles for the cameras I use, and some other cameras, so whenever I import files from those cameras it will automatically default to +20 on the sharpness. Once you set it up, and backup the file, you will never have to do it again even if you install windows fresh or reset it.

2. It helps to improve performance with the big files, is if you set the cache size larger from preferences.

3. Enabling full GPU acceleration improves performance, but will cause some lags if you are using Photoshop at the same time. Change it to basic / Auto to improve performance if Photoshop is also open.

4. When culling images or even just pixel peeping or looking for the sharper images out of a few (in case of continuous shots), I found that uncompressed RAWs have a better response time than the lossless compressed / compressed ones.

5. General tips: A catalog for each shoot is preferable to me, rather than a large catalog with all images, organized by dates or folders. I find the individual catalog for each shoots works well and is more responsive. Also it is safe in a ways, in case of corruption or data loss, you are not losing much.

6. General tips: I always enable XMP and set catalog to backup every time LR exits, this way the XMP can hold the settings even if the catalog is corrupted for some reason, and backing up every time means I have redundant copies. Of course there is a skip option if you opened the catalog for something minor and doesn't need backing up.

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Greg7579
OP Greg7579 Forum Pro • Posts: 13,506
Re: LR Tips for GFX Files

Great post Jim.  I especially didn't know that you made your LR sharpening that low.  I will have to do that now - start at 25 vs 32 or so.

Great explanation concerning highlights.  Into my notes that goes.

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Greg7579
OP Greg7579 Forum Pro • Posts: 13,506
Re: LR Tips for GFX Files

matteroner wrote:

Good tips.

My tip.

If you shoot jpg and raw you can easily get that jpg profile to be applied to the raw image by selecting camera settings under the develop settings on import. This gives you a great starting point imo. You can always save it as a virtual copy and revert another to the adobe version. But I've had images where I edit like crazy and can't get back to what the original jpg looked like. This way I can start there, but still have the raw flexibility.

I think when I go out today I will shoot raw plus jpeg and import the raws with the camera's develop settings.  I didn't know you could do that.

When that happens do you see where the sliders moved off of default, or does that set a new default so the sliders are in the middle? In other words, can you see what the in-camera settings being brought into LR did in LR?

I'm unclear on this.

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Greg7579
OP Greg7579 Forum Pro • Posts: 13,506
Re: LR Tips for GFX Files

Manzur Fahim wrote:

Greg7579 wrote:

There are a lot of new GFX shooters with this new "bargain-priced" GFX 100s.

Those of us who have been shooting GFX for years know a few common things about how Adobe handles GFX files. Add your tips and tricks here:

1. Chris is adamant about this one and has reported it to Adobe many times. The LR default for sharpening is way too high at 40 and should be 31. I almost always change the sharpening to 30 to 33.

1. I created profiles for the cameras I use, and some other cameras, so whenever I import files from those cameras it will automatically default to +20 on the sharpness. Once you set it up, and backup the file, you will never have to do it again even if you install windows fresh or reset it.

2. It helps to improve performance with the big files, is if you set the cache size larger from preferences.

3. Enabling full GPU acceleration improves performance, but will cause some lags if you are using Photoshop at the same time. Change it to basic / Auto to improve performance if Photoshop is also open.

4. When culling images or even just pixel peeping or looking for the sharper images out of a few (in case of continuous shots), I found that uncompressed RAWs have a better response time than the lossless compressed / compressed ones.

5. General tips: A catalog for each shoot is preferable to me, rather than a large catalog with all images, organized by dates or folders. I find the individual catalog for each shoots works well and is more responsive. Also it is safe in a ways, in case of corruption or data loss, you are not losing much.

6. General tips: I always enable XMP and set catalog to backup every time LR exits, this way the XMP can hold the settings even if the catalog is corrupted for some reason, and backing up every time means I have redundant copies. Of course there is a skip option if you opened the catalog for something minor and doesn't need backing up.

Great tips Manzur.  I don't agree with the catalog for each shoot bit.  The LR gurus would all disagree with you.  But you know what you are doing and can get away with it.

But that sounds like a nightmare to me.

I have one catalog and I always set LR to produce sidecar files with all the editing info in them.  That is essential and there is no reason not to do it.

I know some neat tricks on how best to import the catalog to my PC from my travel laptop.  I don't import catalog at all.  I copy all the raw files with their sidecar files from my laptop to my master PC into the folder I name and them import the raw files to that folder by adding the images to the catalog (not copying them, because I already did that).  The sidecar files insert all of the editing info that I did on the road into the master catalog.  Then I erase everything from my laptop and start over.

Importing the catalog creates a mess of LR-created folder layers and names.  I want total control of my folder structure.  Every shot I have taken that is a keeper is on my 8TB internal SSD under one folder.

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Rob de Loe
Rob de Loe Senior Member • Posts: 1,203
Re: LR Tips for GFX Files

matteroner wrote:

Good tips.

My tip.

If you shoot jpg and raw you can easily get that jpg profile to be applied to the raw image by selecting camera settings under the develop settings on import.

Can you explain Matt?

What you wrote suggests there's a way to apply whatever settings were used to create the JPEG, including in-camera adjustments, to the RAW file on import.

I'm not seeing any options to apply camera settings on import, beyond the ones that I see when I'm importing RAW only sessions. In Lightroom I can apply Adobe's version of the Fuji JPEG profiles (but I don't need the JPEG to do that).

JimKasson
MOD JimKasson Forum Pro • Posts: 33,846
Lr artifacts

JimKasson wrote:

Lr is a proxy editor. What you see on the screen is not what you'll get on export, though it's usually pretty close. In particular, artifacts that you see on screen may not appear in the export.

Here's an example of Lr-generated artifacts:

Here's the exported file:

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SrMi
SrMi Senior Member • Posts: 2,081
Re: LR Tips for GFX Files

Greg7579 wrote:

There are a lot of new GFX shooters with this new "bargain-priced" GFX 100s.

Those of us who have been shooting GFX for years know a few common things about how Adobe handles GFX files. Add your tips and tricks here:

1. Chris is adamant about this one and has reported it to Adobe many times. The LR default for sharpening is way too high at 40 and should be 31. I almost always change the sharpening to 30 to 33.

2. Chris is adamant about this one too and has reported it to Adobe. The LR default is always way too high on the tint (to the right towards magenta) on the bottom WB slider. It is not subtle. It almost always need to be moved to the left 6 to 12 points on the number scale.

3. In my experience of using LR to develop probably 20,000 (much more probably) GFX RAF raw files, almost any file (especially landscapes and city scenes) benefit with a little dose of Vibrance and Clarity. Not so for portraits right Chris?

4. If you post files on Flickr or DPR, go ahead and export them as full-size JPEGs at 90% quality. I learned this over many series of trial and error and lessons from Jim two years ago. That will get them down into the 35 to 45 MB range. 90% quality has really no discernable difference from 100% and some would say to go as low as 80%.

On file-size: Why downsize the files from full size? Leave image sizing alone and at full size and let the incredible JPEG algorithms do their work. Of course you can size for printing or for specific purposes on the web as desired and dramatically downsize the dimensions if you want, but leave the files full size for posting on DPR or Flickr (unless you are a pro trying to sell images and don't want people to have the huge file).

5. GFX files will amaze you with there mailability in LR. The ability to left shadows seems almost endless. One must be careful not to even the scene out too much. Like Left Eye, Chris, Jim and Farz have told me many times - go easy on the shadow-lifting. Leave some dramatic shadows that add richness to the scene.

6. Blown highlights might be forever blown (as they say), but let me tell you that the highlights slider works wonders with GFX files as you move it to the left and recover those blinkies.

Blinkies in Lightroom do not mean that the highlights are blown (use Rawdigger to find out). If one of your channels is really blown, recovering highlights may change the color of the highlights. Sometimes it is best to clone/heal or content-aware fill on those places.

7. Go easy on the luminance slider. You don't often need that noise reduction work and it can smooth out in a bad way some very fine distant detail that GFX files are famous for.

If there is any noise to fix, I recommend using DxO PhotoLab 4 (DeepPrime) as the first demosaicing and denoising step. It integrates very well with Lightroom. DxO does not support 100S yet (support scheduled for June).

8. GFX files have an amazing look and the fine detail just blows you away. Experiment with the new Texture slider. It adds some oomph to tree trunks, brick walls and stone paths in an interesting way, especially with B&W conversion.

9. Try B&W 03 on GFX files with lots of contrast. There are 17 B&W profile types to choose from.

What are your favorite tips?

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matteroner
matteroner Senior Member • Posts: 1,174
Re: LR Tips for GFX Files

Greg7579 wrote:

matteroner wrote:

Good tips.

My tip.

If you shoot jpg and raw you can easily get that jpg profile to be applied to the raw image by selecting camera settings under the develop settings on import. This gives you a great starting point imo. You can always save it as a virtual copy and revert another to the adobe version. But I've had images where I edit like crazy and can't get back to what the original jpg looked like. This way I can start there, but still have the raw flexibility.

I think when I go out today I will shoot raw plus jpeg and import the raws with the camera's develop settings. I didn't know you could do that.

When that happens do you see where the sliders moved off of default, or does that set a new default so the sliders are in the middle? In other words, can you see what the in-camera settings being brought into LR did in LR?

I'm unclear on this.

The sliders will all be set to middle.

This is the import setting.

The only downside is if you use a black and white profile you will not have access to the b&w color sliders. Which is actually a big problem for me, because I tend to capture in acros -red.

Edit: This works when shooting only raw. Just tested it.  Must be in the embedded jpg.  But you won't have access to in camera crop modes.

Also it is the same as changing the profile in the basic panel. But I like this workflow better

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matteroner
matteroner Senior Member • Posts: 1,174
Re: LR Tips for GFX Files

Rob de Loe wrote:

matteroner wrote:

Good tips.

My tip.

If you shoot jpg and raw you can easily get that jpg profile to be applied to the raw image by selecting camera settings under the develop settings on import.

Can you explain Matt?

What you wrote suggests there's a way to apply whatever settings were used to create the JPEG, including in-camera adjustments, to the RAW file on import.

I'm not seeing any options to apply camera settings on import, beyond the ones that I see when I'm importing RAW only sessions. In Lightroom I can apply Adobe's version of the Fuji JPEG profiles (but I don't need the JPEG to do that).

Applying the profile will give the same result. But that's an added step. When I import I want all the files to look like what the camera showed me. Just my preference to help me remember what I was thinking at the time.

Here is the area to change it. This may also work when shooting raw only, but I haven't tried it.

Edit: it works even when shooting raw only.

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Rob de Loe
Rob de Loe Senior Member • Posts: 1,203
Re: LR Tips for GFX Files

matteroner wrote:

Rob de Loe wrote:

matteroner wrote:

Good tips.

My tip.

If you shoot jpg and raw you can easily get that jpg profile to be applied to the raw image by selecting camera settings under the develop settings on import.

Can you explain Matt?

What you wrote suggests there's a way to apply whatever settings were used to create the JPEG, including in-camera adjustments, to the RAW file on import.

I'm not seeing any options to apply camera settings on import, beyond the ones that I see when I'm importing RAW only sessions. In Lightroom I can apply Adobe's version of the Fuji JPEG profiles (but I don't need the JPEG to do that).

Applying the profile will give the same result. But that's an added step. When I import I want all the files to look like what the camera showed me. Just my preference to help me remember what I was thinking at the time.

Here is the area to change it. This may also work when shooting raw only, but I haven't tried it.

Edit: it works even when shooting raw only.

Strange. I don't have that option.

matteroner
matteroner Senior Member • Posts: 1,174
Re: LR Tips for GFX Files

Rob de Loe wrote:

matteroner wrote:

Rob de Loe wrote:

matteroner wrote:

Good tips.

My tip.

If you shoot jpg and raw you can easily get that jpg profile to be applied to the raw image by selecting camera settings under the develop settings on import.

Can you explain Matt?

What you wrote suggests there's a way to apply whatever settings were used to create the JPEG, including in-camera adjustments, to the RAW file on import.

I'm not seeing any options to apply camera settings on import, beyond the ones that I see when I'm importing RAW only sessions. In Lightroom I can apply Adobe's version of the Fuji JPEG profiles (but I don't need the JPEG to do that).

Applying the profile will give the same result. But that's an added step. When I import I want all the files to look like what the camera showed me. Just my preference to help me remember what I was thinking at the time.

Here is the area to change it. This may also work when shooting raw only, but I haven't tried it.

Edit: it works even when shooting raw only.

Strange. I don't have that option.

Look in the defaults tab

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Rob de Loe
Rob de Loe Senior Member • Posts: 1,203
Re: LR Tips for GFX Files

matteroner wrote:

Strange. I don't have that option.

Look in the defaults tab

Dh'o! And there it is. I did look in the defaults tab before posting, but my eyes skipped right over the entry.

As you've already noted, people who shoot RAW only (like me) can use that same setting to apply whatever film simulation they used in the camera when shooting that RAW. And it's all fully reversible of course once the RAW is imported.

Thanks for helping me sort that out.

As a side note, messing around with this confirmed a couple things for me:

1. The Adobe interpretations of the Fuji Film Simulations are very close. I compared the JPEG with Fuji film simulation  and RAW with Adobe version of the same film simulation. Capture One fans are always claiming that the C1 versions are much better. Perhaps, but the LR versions are just fine.

2. You surely are leaving a lot on the table if you shoot a GFX camera in JPEG. That's really evident if you side-by-side compare the JPEG and the RAW.

matteroner
matteroner Senior Member • Posts: 1,174
Re: LR Tips for GFX Files

Rob de Loe wrote:

matteroner wrote:

Strange. I don't have that option.

Look in the defaults tab

Dh'o! And there it is. I did look in the defaults tab before posting, but my eyes skipped right over the entry.

As you've already noted, people who shoot RAW only (like me) can use that same setting to apply whatever film simulation they used in the camera when shooting that RAW. And it's all fully reversible of course once the RAW is imported.

Thanks for helping me sort that out.

As a side note, messing around with this confirmed a couple things for me:

1. The Adobe interpretations of the Fuji Film Simulations are very close. I compared the JPEG with Fuji film simulation and RAW with Adobe version of the same film simulation. Capture One fans are always claiming that the C1 versions are much better. Perhaps, but the LR versions are just fine.

2. You surely are leaving a lot on the table if you shoot a GFX camera in JPEG. That's really evident if you side-by-side compare the JPEG and the RAW.

Glad I could help. I agree with your follow up points.

Also I feel like the fuji profiles are a bit better starting place for edits vs let's say adobe color, which tends to be extremely oversaturated.

I should also say that the 2 things jpg plus raw gets you is ability to accurately check focus on a fine jpg in camera and crop modes.  I need these things, so I'm locked into shooting this way.

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Rob de Loe
Rob de Loe Senior Member • Posts: 1,203
Re: LR Tips for GFX Files

matteroner wrote:

Rob de Loe wrote:

As a side note, messing around with this confirmed a couple things for me:

1. The Adobe interpretations of the Fuji Film Simulations are very close. I compared the JPEG with Fuji film simulation and RAW with Adobe version of the same film simulation. Capture One fans are always claiming that the C1 versions are much better. Perhaps, but the LR versions are just fine.

2. You surely are leaving a lot on the table if you shoot a GFX camera in JPEG. That's really evident if you side-by-side compare the JPEG and the RAW.

Glad I could help. I agree with your follow up points.

Also I feel like the fuji profiles are a bit better starting place for edits vs let's say adobe color, which tends to be extremely oversaturated.

It's great to have options. I work almost exclusively in black and white so I've been happy with the Adobe Monochrome profile as the starting point. When it became available, Julienne Kost wrote, "This profile slightly shifts colors as they are converted to grayscale – brightening the warmer colors and darkening the cooler colors. It also adds a small amount of contrast but allows lots of headroom for editing." That matches my experience. I did try using Acros as a starting point because I used to shoot Acros film. However, I don't like losing access to the colour channels.

I should also say that the 2 things jpg plus raw gets you is ability to accurately check focus on a fine jpg in camera and crop modes. I need these things, so I'm locked into shooting this way.

That's a perfect use case. I've gone back and forth between shooting and not shooting the JPEG. Currently I'm in the "not shooting" part of the cycle.

Manzur Fahim
Manzur Fahim Veteran Member • Posts: 3,552
Re: LR Tips for GFX Files
1

Greg7579 wrote:

Great tips Manzur. I don't agree with the catalog for each shoot bit. The LR gurus would all disagree with you. But you know what you are doing and can get away with it.

But that sounds like a nightmare to me.

I have one catalog and I always set LR to produce sidecar files with all the editing info in them. That is essential and there is no reason not to do it.

I know some neat tricks on how best to import the catalog to my PC from my travel laptop. I don't import catalog at all. I copy all the raw files with their sidecar files from my laptop to my master PC into the folder I name and them import the raw files to that folder by adding the images to the catalog (not copying them, because I already did that). The sidecar files insert all of the editing info that I did on the road into the master catalog. Then I erase everything from my laptop and start over.

Importing the catalog creates a mess of LR-created folder layers and names. I want total control of my folder structure. Every shot I have taken that is a keeper is on my 8TB internal SSD under one folder.

I tried having around 20k photos in one catalog just last week from various shoots, and the catalog was slower than the individual ones I normally use. So, for me I see no reason to do that.

That sounds like a lot of work Greg. They way I do things is:

01. My LR is set to ask me which catalog to open when I double click on the LR icon. I select create a new catalog and name the catalog.

02. LR creates a folder in that name and puts the catalog inside that folder. I copy all my raw files from that shoot in that folder. Then I remove the memory card.

03. I import the files to the catalog, and that's it. If I need to take it with me on my laptop, I just copy the folder to my laptop. Then I just open the catalog and edit or whatever I want to do.

Sidecar files will bring the edit to the new catalog (in your case), but it only brings the final edit, it does not give you the whole develop history, which the catalog does. So I simply copy the whole folder.

I have FULL control over my folder structure because from the very beginning I organize it just the way I want it. This is how it looks for example:

Name of the shoot - location (Date)

Very simple to do, and I have my website organized exactly this way, so it is all very seamless.

 Manzur Fahim's gear list:Manzur Fahim's gear list
Fujifilm GFX 100 Sony a7R IV Fujifilm GF 63mm F2.8 Fujifilm GF 110mm F2 Fujifilm GF 23mm F4 +9 more
Rob de Loe
Rob de Loe Senior Member • Posts: 1,203
Super Resolution inside Lightroom

If you use Lightroom and Adobe's new Super Resolution tool, you might be frustrated that SR is not available in LR yet. It will be, but in the meantime here's a workaround for Windows users. I don't use Mac, but if something like this can be done on a Mac, perhaps someone else can let us know.

  • In your LR library, right-click the RAW file you want to process with Super Resolution, and then choose the option Find in Explorer from the pop-up menu. Explorer will open, and the RAW file you chose will be selected.
  • Right-click on the RAW file in Explorer, and choose Open With Adobe Photoshop 2021; I do it using "Open with" and the sub-menu, but you might be setup to have Photoshop as a defined menu item in the main menu.
  • Photoshop should open and launch ACR. Process in ACR with Super Resolution (Enhance). This dumps a DNG in the folder where the source file is.
  • Quit ACR without saving (the new file is already saved as a DNG in the same folder where your original RAW file is located).
  • Back in Lightroom, go to the Folder section (normally the pane on the left-hand side), click on the folder where your source file was stored, and choose Synchronize Folder. This will import the DNG you just created into your catalogue.

Note: you can't "Synchronize Folder" from the main Library window; you have to do it from the folder that contains the DNG just created. When you use the Synchronize Folder tool, you'll be asked if you want to import all the files it finds, and update metadata. Don't be surprised if other images you thought were deleted from your catalogue show up. Sometimes the folder contains orphaned files. You can delete them if you don't want them.

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