Canon FD adapter: K&F issues

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renixx
renixx Regular Member • Posts: 382
Canon FD adapter: K&F issues

Hi everyone, I have a Canon FD-M4/3 K&F adapter (orange ring). But I am noticing a problem: when I put the adapter in the "open" position (it has an "open / lock" switch) I have to make many attempts before I can obtain closing diaphragms of my canon FD. If it is not connected well it always stays on opening 1.4. Yet I think K&F is one of the best, but maybe I'm wrong. I don't know if this is a common problem for all FD adapters and lenses. What do you think I should do? That way I spend more time finding the right connection than taking pictures ...

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Aoi Usagi Senior Member • Posts: 2,622
Re: Canon FD adapter: K&F issues

FD adapters seem to have the most issues. The lock - open switch is very confusing for new users. Be sure to mount the lens with the "Lock" text aligned to the red index dot on the lens. This is true for both breech lock and FDn bayonet hybrid mount. Once mounted, turn the Lock-Open ring towards "Lock". The "open" text should now be somewhat lined up to the red dot (breech mount), as shown below.

Other issues may be that some third party lenses have slightly longer or thicker stop down levers making it bind.

This is a photo of the adapter in the correct position have it has been properly mounted.

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Formally Evogt500

Belgarchi Senior Member • Posts: 2,392
Re: Canon FD adapter: K&F issues
4

renixx wrote:

Hi everyone, I have a Canon FD-M4/3 K&F adapter (orange ring). But I am noticing a problem: when I put the adapter in the "open" position (it has an "open / lock" switch) I have to make many attempts before I can obtain closing diaphragms of my canon FD. If it is not connected well it always stays on opening 1.4. Yet I think K&F is one of the best, but maybe I'm wrong. I don't know if this is a common problem for all FD adapters and lenses. What do you think I should do? That way I spend more time finding the right connection than taking pictures ...

Do like me, but faster: after trying 3 Canon FD adapters, I bit the bullet (the cost), bought a Novoflex, never looked back and still am very happy with it.

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ProfHankD
ProfHankD Veteran Member • Posts: 7,801
Re: Canon FD adapter: K&F issues
1

renixx wrote:

Hi everyone, I have a Canon FD-M4/3 K&F adapter (orange ring). But I am noticing a problem: when I put the adapter in the "open" position (it has an "open / lock" switch) I have to make many attempts before I can obtain closing diaphragms of my canon FD.

Do you mean you have to re-mount the lens or that you have to turn the ring multiple times? Re-mounting is the remedy for having the pin on the wrong side of the stop-down lever (as another poster suggested), but I've never seen a situation where it took multiple operations of the open/close ring to get the lens to stop down.

That said, Canon did NOT standardize the aperture lever nor its motion. Some move in a straight line, some in an arc, and some literally just pivot; the shape of the lever also varies, from various diameter pins to sheet-metal tabs, and pin length wasn't standardized either. Basically, it's a bit of a nightmare for any 3rd-party trying to make an FL/FD/FDn mount... although it does seem that Canon had a reference contact point that all their bodies and lenses could meet at.

If it is not connected well it always stays on opening 1.4. Yet I think K&F is one of the best, but maybe I'm wrong. I don't know if this is a common problem for all FD adapters and lenses. What do you think I should do? That way I spend more time finding the right connection than taking pictures ...

The only thing I can think of is that either the lever is long enough to hit something in the adapter or your lens has a broken aperture mechanism -- do you feel heavy resistance to turning the open/close ring? You can also look for scratch marks where a too-long pin might be scraping in the adapter, in which case the fix is to grind/file-down the pin a little... because they don't need to be anywhere near as long as some are.

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Sittatunga Senior Member • Posts: 3,036
Re: Canon FD adapter: K&F issues
1

Aoi Usagi wrote:

FD adapters seem to have the most issues. The lock - open switch is very confusing for new users. Be sure to mount the lens with the "Lock" text aligned to the red index dot on the lens. This is true for both breech lock and FDn bayonet hybrid mount. Once mounted, turn the Lock-Open ring towards "Lock". The "open" text should now be somewhat lined up to the red dot (breech mount), as shown below.

Other issues may be that some third party lenses have slightly longer or thicker stop down levers making it bind.

This is a photo of the adapter in the correct position have it has been properly mounted.

That photo is a little confusing, I hope this one is clearer. The markings on the adapter are really confusing as the arrows would have been better placed outside the words rather than being a double headed arrow between them.

The stop down lever (3) moves to the right as seen from the camera end to stop the lens down. That means you have to rotate the control ring fully clockwise (in the direction of the arrow pointing to the word OPEN) before you mount the lens so that the internal prong can push lever (3) in the right direction. Once the lens is mounted you turn the ring fully anti-clockwise (in the direction of the arrow pointing to the word LOCK) to stop the lens down. Simple, except that it puts the word OPEN nearest the focus index when it's stopped down and the word LOCK nearest it when it's unlocked to allow you to engage the mechanism when mounting the lens.

Heritage Cameras
Heritage Cameras Senior Member • Posts: 1,807
Re: Canon FD adapter: K&F issues

Belgarchi wrote:

Do like me, but faster: after trying 3 Canon FD adapters, I bit the bullet (the cost), bought a Novoflex, never looked back and still am very happy with it.

Yes, I also prefer this type with a fixed diaphragm pin instead of the Open/Lock ring.

There are some others, such as this excellent one I use from Poland:

https://c7adapters.com/en/product/canon_fd_-_micro_4_3/66

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/64018716

Some focal reducers (but not all) also use the same diaphragm system.

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Dave, HCL

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MOD Tom Caldwell Forum Pro • Posts: 42,594
The de-facto preset aperture adapter

Sittatunga wrote:

Aoi Usagi wrote:

FD adapters seem to have the most issues. The lock - open switch is very confusing for new users. Be sure to mount the lens with the "Lock" text aligned to the red index dot on the lens. This is true for both breech lock and FDn bayonet hybrid mount. Once mounted, turn the Lock-Open ring towards "Lock". The "open" text should now be somewhat lined up to the red dot (breech mount), as shown below.

Other issues may be that some third party lenses have slightly longer or thicker stop down levers making it bind.

This is a photo of the adapter in the correct position have it has been properly mounted.

That photo is a little confusing, I hope this one is clearer. The markings on the adapter are really confusing as the arrows would have been better placed outside the words rather than being a double headed arrow between them.

The stop down lever (3) moves to the right as seen from the camera end to stop the lens down. That means you have to rotate the control ring fully clockwise (in the direction of the arrow pointing to the word OPEN) before you mount the lens so that the internal prong can push lever (3) in the right direction. Once the lens is mounted you turn the ring fully anti-clockwise (in the direction of the arrow pointing to the word LOCK) to stop the lens down. Simple, except that it puts the word OPEN nearest the focus index when it's stopped down and the word LOCK nearest it when it's unlocked to allow you to engage the mechanism when mounting the lens.

Agreed, always has been confusing but the secret to understanding is that if the aperture operating lever or rod can be identified in the lens cavity then the operating rod in the adapter must be on the correct side of the lens aperture lever when mounting. This can be noted before the parts are brought together. Once components are joined the adapter is then moved into the operational position.

It is possible to mount the lens correctly on an adapter where the actual adapter “hook” is fixed as in the Ciecio7* Polish adapter and this has two red dots - one to start the mount process and the other to push the parts together. You don’t even need the dots and if the lens is first presented slightly to the clockwise right of the mating dot on the lens before rotating to the mount position it will hook the aperture actuating lever up quite easily in any case.

A side benefit of the rotating aperture hook in FD adapters is that it can operate like a preset mechanism. When active it allows the final aperture to be set - made inactive the lens is wide open and more precise point of focus can be set (with more light) then rotate back to the known preset aperture for the shot.

* now “C7” apparently - I am glad because I have always found it hard to remember the spelling.

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Tom Caldwell

MOD Tom Caldwell Forum Pro • Posts: 42,594
K&F comment

A comment on K&F - they are into pretty packaging at a higher price and this seems to go down well on the “Western” market which sets a lot of store by packaging.

I have a few of their products and they work well and are well made.  But they are not paragons of precision as when I tested eight different brand LTM-M4/3 adapter which I wanted to buy in bulk to semi-permanently adapt these lenses to M4/3 mount it was one of only two (and the second most expensive) that did not get their flange focal distance right by exactly 1mm (quite a lot).  To their credit, when I complained they promptly refunded all my money.  The cheapest which were unbranded and came in simple plastic bags from Laos worked out at AUD$3.40 each and were perfect flange focal registration - as were five of the others.

RJ who often don’t even brand their product, comes in plain white cardboard boxes - is quite a lot cheaper and I have never had an issue with their product.

The cost of pretty packaging can add quite a lot to a product, but if it looks good then it must be good.  Then translates  into brand name respect and better margins.

I can recommend K&F myself and I only note that pretty packaging is of itself not necessarily the 100% indication of a perfect product.  But good, no questions asked, post purchase support is welcomed.  Consumers of course have to be honest as well.

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Tom Caldwell

farmer35 Contributing Member • Posts: 915
Re: The de-facto preset aperture adapter

Tom Caldwell wrote:

Sittatunga wrote:

Aoi Usagi wrote:

FD adapters seem to have the most issues. The lock - open switch is very confusing for new users. Be sure to mount the lens with the "Lock" text aligned to the red index dot on the lens. This is true for both breech lock and FDn bayonet hybrid mount. Once mounted, turn the Lock-Open ring towards "Lock". The "open" text should now be somewhat lined up to the red dot (breech mount), as shown below.

Other issues may be that some third party lenses have slightly longer or thicker stop down levers making it bind.

This is a photo of the adapter in the correct position have it has been properly mounted.

That photo is a little confusing, I hope this one is clearer. The markings on the adapter are really confusing as the arrows would have been better placed outside the words rather than being a double headed arrow between them.

The stop down lever (3) moves to the right as seen from the camera end to stop the lens down. That means you have to rotate the control ring fully clockwise (in the direction of the arrow pointing to the word OPEN) before you mount the lens so that the internal prong can push lever (3) in the right direction. Once the lens is mounted you turn the ring fully anti-clockwise (in the direction of the arrow pointing to the word LOCK) to stop the lens down. Simple, except that it puts the word OPEN nearest the focus index when it's stopped down and the word LOCK nearest it when it's unlocked to allow you to engage the mechanism when mounting the lens.

Agreed, always has been confusing but the secret to understanding is that if the aperture operating lever or rod can be identified in the lens cavity then the operating rod in the adapter must be on the correct side of the lens aperture lever when mounting. This can be noted before the parts are brought together. Once components are joined the adapter is then moved into the operational position.

It is possible to mount the lens correctly on an adapter where the actual adapter “hook” is fixed as in the Ciecio7* Polish adapter and this has two red dots - one to start the mount process and the other to push the parts together. You don’t even need the dots and if the lens is first presented slightly to the clockwise right of the mating dot on the lens before rotating to the mount position it will hook the aperture actuating lever up quite easily in any case.

A side benefit of the rotating aperture hook in FD adapters is that it can operate like a preset mechanism. When active it allows the final aperture to be set - made inactive the lens is wide open and more precise point of focus can be set (with more light) then rotate back to the known preset aperture for the shot.

* now “C7” apparently - I am glad because I have always found it hard to remember the spelling.

What is simple for one person to remember is not necessarily so for another.  Here is the way I do it:  I set the open-lock switch one way, mount the lens on the adapter, and then turn the switch the other way after the lens is mounted.  If the aperture opens and closes when I turn the aperture ring, I'm good to go.  If the aperture doesn't change when I turn the aperture ring, I take the adapter off and do it again, this time reversing the way I had the switch to begin.

I have 3 or 4 FD mount lenses and 2 or 3 FD adapters.  None of them are lenses I use regularly so I don't switch adapters very often.  If I did it regularly I would probably remember which way to go but I don't.

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Bruce Regier

Sittatunga Senior Member • Posts: 3,036
Re: The de-facto preset aperture adapter

farmer35 wrote:

Tom Caldwell wrote:

Sittatunga wrote:

Aoi Usagi wrote:

FD adapters seem to have the most issues. The lock - open switch is very confusing for new users. Be sure to mount the lens with the "Lock" text aligned to the red index dot on the lens. This is true for both breech lock and FDn bayonet hybrid mount. Once mounted, turn the Lock-Open ring towards "Lock". The "open" text should now be somewhat lined up to the red dot (breech mount), as shown below.

Other issues may be that some third party lenses have slightly longer or thicker stop down levers making it bind.

This is a photo of the adapter in the correct position have it has been properly mounted.

That photo is a little confusing, I hope this one is clearer. The markings on the adapter are really confusing as the arrows would have been better placed outside the words rather than being a double headed arrow between them.

The stop down lever (3) moves to the right as seen from the camera end to stop the lens down. That means you have to rotate the control ring fully clockwise (in the direction of the arrow pointing to the word OPEN) before you mount the lens so that the internal prong can push lever (3) in the right direction. Once the lens is mounted you turn the ring fully anti-clockwise (in the direction of the arrow pointing to the word LOCK) to stop the lens down. Simple, except that it puts the word OPEN nearest the focus index when it's stopped down and the word LOCK nearest it when it's unlocked to allow you to engage the mechanism when mounting the lens.

Agreed, always has been confusing but the secret to understanding is that if the aperture operating lever or rod can be identified in the lens cavity then the operating rod in the adapter must be on the correct side of the lens aperture lever when mounting. This can be noted before the parts are brought together. Once components are joined the adapter is then moved into the operational position.

It is possible to mount the lens correctly on an adapter where the actual adapter “hook” is fixed as in the Ciecio7* Polish adapter and this has two red dots - one to start the mount process and the other to push the parts together. You don’t even need the dots and if the lens is first presented slightly to the clockwise right of the mating dot on the lens before rotating to the mount position it will hook the aperture actuating lever up quite easily in any case.

A side benefit of the rotating aperture hook in FD adapters is that it can operate like a preset mechanism. When active it allows the final aperture to be set - made inactive the lens is wide open and more precise point of focus can be set (with more light) then rotate back to the known preset aperture for the shot.

* now “C7” apparently - I am glad because I have always found it hard to remember the spelling.

What is simple for one person to remember is not necessarily so for another. Here is the way I do it: I set the open-lock switch one way, mount the lens on the adapter, and then turn the switch the other way after the lens is mounted. If the aperture opens and closes when I turn the aperture ring, I'm good to go. If the aperture doesn't change when I turn the aperture ring, I take the adapter off and do it again, this time reversing the way I had the switch to begin.

I have 3 or 4 FD mount lenses and 2 or 3 FD adapters. None of them are lenses I use regularly so I don't switch adapters very often. If I did it regularly I would probably remember which way to go but I don't.

I did say the labelling was really confusing.  I'll point out the sarcasm next time I use it.

vivaldibow Contributing Member • Posts: 923
Re: Canon FD adapter: K&F issues

renixx wrote:

Hi everyone, I have a Canon FD-M4/3 K&F adapter (orange ring). But I am noticing a problem: when I put the adapter in the "open" position (it has an "open / lock" switch) I have to make many attempts before I can obtain closing diaphragms of my canon FD. If it is not connected well it always stays on opening 1.4. Yet I think K&F is one of the best, but maybe I'm wrong. I don't know if this is a common problem for all FD adapters and lenses. What do you think I should do? That way I spend more time finding the right connection than taking pictures ...

I also found it depends on which lens you are trying to adapt; the operation could be slightly different. It could be tricky. I've been there as a previous non-Canon FD/FL shooter; it is frustrating to mount FD/FL lenses onto an adapter. But once you get the hang of it, it then will be fine.

MOD Tom Caldwell Forum Pro • Posts: 42,594
Simple and elegant

farmer35 wrote:

Tom Caldwell wrote:

Sittatunga wrote:

Aoi Usagi wrote:

FD adapters seem to have the most issues. The lock - open switch is very confusing for new users. Be sure to mount the lens with the "Lock" text aligned to the red index dot on the lens. This is true for both breech lock and FDn bayonet hybrid mount. Once mounted, turn the Lock-Open ring towards "Lock". The "open" text should now be somewhat lined up to the red dot (breech mount), as shown below.

Other issues may be that some third party lenses have slightly longer or thicker stop down levers making it bind.

This is a photo of the adapter in the correct position have it has been properly mounted.

That photo is a little confusing, I hope this one is clearer. The markings on the adapter are really confusing as the arrows would have been better placed outside the words rather than being a double headed arrow between them.

The stop down lever (3) moves to the right as seen from the camera end to stop the lens down. That means you have to rotate the control ring fully clockwise (in the direction of the arrow pointing to the word OPEN) before you mount the lens so that the internal prong can push lever (3) in the right direction. Once the lens is mounted you turn the ring fully anti-clockwise (in the direction of the arrow pointing to the word LOCK) to stop the lens down. Simple, except that it puts the word OPEN nearest the focus index when it's stopped down and the word LOCK nearest it when it's unlocked to allow you to engage the mechanism when mounting the lens.

Agreed, always has been confusing but the secret to understanding is that if the aperture operating lever or rod can be identified in the lens cavity then the operating rod in the adapter must be on the correct side of the lens aperture lever when mounting. This can be noted before the parts are brought together. Once components are joined the adapter is then moved into the operational position.

It is possible to mount the lens correctly on an adapter where the actual adapter “hook” is fixed as in the Ciecio7* Polish adapter and this has two red dots - one to start the mount process and the other to push the parts together. You don’t even need the dots and if the lens is first presented slightly to the clockwise right of the mating dot on the lens before rotating to the mount position it will hook the aperture actuating lever up quite easily in any case.

A side benefit of the rotating aperture hook in FD adapters is that it can operate like a preset mechanism. When active it allows the final aperture to be set - made inactive the lens is wide open and more precise point of focus can be set (with more light) then rotate back to the known preset aperture for the shot.

* now “C7” apparently - I am glad because I have always found it hard to remember the spelling.

What is simple for one person to remember is not necessarily so for another. Here is the way I do it: I set the open-lock switch one way, mount the lens on the adapter, and then turn the switch the other way after the lens is mounted. If the aperture opens and closes when I turn the aperture ring, I'm good to go. If the aperture doesn't change when I turn the aperture ring, I take the adapter off and do it again, this time reversing the way I had the switch to begin.

I have 3 or 4 FD mount lenses and 2 or 3 FD adapters. None of them are lenses I use regularly so I don't switch adapters very often. If I did it regularly I would probably remember which way to go but I don't.

I know the theory Bruce, but I have to admit I usually end up using your simple and elegant method.

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Tom Caldwell

J.K.T. Regular Member • Posts: 296
Re: Canon FD adapter: K&F issues

ProfHankD wrote:

The only thing I can think of is that either the lever is long enough to hit something in the adapter or your lens has a broken aperture mechanism

A bit late, but I'll offer a third: the pin on the adapter could be too short to properly engage the lever. I wouldn't have thought that possible, but that was the situation with a cheap FD to EF macro adapter. The pin never touched the lever.

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