ND filter shutter speed conversion

Started 6 months ago | Discussions
Merlin5 Senior Member • Posts: 2,114
ND filter shutter speed conversion

Hi guys. I'm going to be buying a 10 stop ND filter and have been learning how to expose for it from a youtube tutorial.

In the tutorial he shows a conversion chart so that if for instance he's correctly exposed at shutter speed 1/1000th and ISO 100 before putting the filter on, it'll be 1 second when the filter is put on. Or if it's  a different aperture and correctly exposed at1/250th, it'll be 4 seconds with the filter on. Why would I need a conversion chart though if presumably all I have to do is keep dialling the shutter speed down until I see the exposure meter correctly exposing, i.e, in the centre?

 Merlin5's gear list:Merlin5's gear list
Sony a6600 Sigma 16mm F1.4 DC DN (E/EF-M mounts) Sigma 56mm F1.4 DC DN Sony E 70-350mm F4.5-6.3 G OSS
rumple
rumple Senior Member • Posts: 1,725
Re: ND filter shutter speed conversion
1

Merlin5 wrote:

Hi guys. I'm going to be buying a 10 stop ND filter

[...]

Why would I need a conversion chart though if presumably all I have to do is keep dialling the shutter speed down until I see the exposure meter correctly exposing, i.e, in the centre?

Because at some point your exposures may go over 30 seconds and you'll need to manually calculate then use an external timer, or a stopwatch and Bulb mode.

Also because if you have a desired shutter speed (e.g., 1 second for walking people, 6-10 seconds for misty moving water, and so one), the chart will tell you your starting point.

Having said that, ten-stop filters are easy.  Just take the exposure and multiply by 1000, as you have already noted from your chart.   You want a 100 second exposure to make moving clouds into art?  Start with a 1/10 exposure.

-- hide signature --

"THINK" - Watson

OP Merlin5 Senior Member • Posts: 2,114
Re: ND filter shutter speed conversion

rumple wrote:

Merlin5 wrote:

Hi guys. I'm going to be buying a 10 stop ND filter

[...]

Why would I need a conversion chart though if presumably all I have to do is keep dialling the shutter speed down until I see the exposure meter correctly exposing, i.e, in the centre?

Because at some point your exposures may go over 30 seconds and you'll need to manually calculate then use an external timer, or a stopwatch and Bulb mode.

Also because if you have a desired shutter speed (e.g., 1 second for walking people, 6-10 seconds for misty moving water, and so one), the chart will tell you your starting point.

Having said that, ten-stop filters are easy. Just take the exposure and multiply by 1000, as you have already noted from your chart. You want a 100 second exposure to make moving clouds into art? Start with a 1/10 exposure.

Thank you rumple, I understand a bit better now.

 Merlin5's gear list:Merlin5's gear list
Sony a6600 Sigma 16mm F1.4 DC DN (E/EF-M mounts) Sigma 56mm F1.4 DC DN Sony E 70-350mm F4.5-6.3 G OSS
JustUs7 Senior Member • Posts: 2,645
Re: ND filter shutter speed conversion

Like everything else in the world, there’s an app for that.  I have my phone on me. I set up in AV at base ISO, see what shutter speed the camera gives me (after any exposure comp adjustments).  Then I switch to manual or bulb, use the app, and set my shutter speed accordingly (while using the same aperture and base ISO) with the filter in place of course.  I use a trigger release to actuate the shutter.

 JustUs7's gear list:JustUs7's gear list
Canon EOS 1000D Canon EOS Rebel SL1 Canon EOS RP Canon EOS M6 II Canon EF 75-300mm f/4.0-5.6 III +7 more
OP Merlin5 Senior Member • Posts: 2,114
Re: ND filter shutter speed conversion

JustUs7 wrote:

Like everything else in the world, there’s an app for that. I have my phone on me. I set up in AV at base ISO, see what shutter speed the camera gives me (after any exposure comp adjustments). Then I switch to manual or bulb, use the app, and set my shutter speed accordingly (while using the same aperture and base ISO) with the filter in place of course. I use a trigger release to actuate the shutter.

I can't find LE Calculator on Google play store, but have found this one called 'ND Filter Calculator (DSLR)'. I've got mirroreless but I presume the calculator should still work fine? Seems to have a good rating at 4.7.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=de.litedev.ndfilter

 Merlin5's gear list:Merlin5's gear list
Sony a6600 Sigma 16mm F1.4 DC DN (E/EF-M mounts) Sigma 56mm F1.4 DC DN Sony E 70-350mm F4.5-6.3 G OSS
BBbuilder467 Veteran Member • Posts: 5,617
Re: ND filter shutter speed conversion

Merlin5 wrote:

Hi guys. I'm going to be buying a 10 stop ND filter and have been learning how to expose for it from a youtube tutorial.

In the tutorial he shows a conversion chart so that if for instance he's correctly exposed at shutter speed 1/1000th and ISO 100 before putting the filter on, it'll be 1 second when the filter is put on. Or if it's a different aperture and correctly exposed at1/250th, it'll be 4 seconds with the filter on. Why would I need a conversion chart though if presumably all I have to do is keep dialling the shutter speed down until I see the exposure meter correctly exposing, i.e, in the centre?

For long exposures, you'll be using a tripod and Manual Exposure mode. Adjust the exposure to "0" or whatever you want for that scene. Then, add the ND and adjust the shutter speed back to the the same EV. You don't have to calculate anything. Except for motion blur or a little contrast, the before and after are identical. All that changes is shutter speed.

OP Merlin5 Senior Member • Posts: 2,114
Re: ND filter shutter speed conversion

BBbuilder467 wrote:

Merlin5 wrote:

Hi guys. I'm going to be buying a 10 stop ND filter and have been learning how to expose for it from a youtube tutorial.

In the tutorial he shows a conversion chart so that if for instance he's correctly exposed at shutter speed 1/1000th and ISO 100 before putting the filter on, it'll be 1 second when the filter is put on. Or if it's a different aperture and correctly exposed at1/250th, it'll be 4 seconds with the filter on. Why would I need a conversion chart though if presumably all I have to do is keep dialling the shutter speed down until I see the exposure meter correctly exposing, i.e, in the centre?

For long exposures, you'll be using a tripod and Manual Exposure mode. Adjust the exposure to "0" or whatever you want for that scene. Then, add the ND and adjust the shutter speed back to the the same EV. You don't have to calculate anything. Except for motion blur or a little contrast, the before and after are identical. All that changes is shutter speed.

Thanks BB builder. With a circular screw on ND filter,  it should be possible I can smooth out sky and water in a single long exposure,  as long as any visible clouds are moving quite fast?

 Merlin5's gear list:Merlin5's gear list
Sony a6600 Sigma 16mm F1.4 DC DN (E/EF-M mounts) Sigma 56mm F1.4 DC DN Sony E 70-350mm F4.5-6.3 G OSS
BBbuilder467 Veteran Member • Posts: 5,617
Re: ND filter shutter speed conversion

Merlin5 wrote:

BBbuilder467 wrote:

Merlin5 wrote:

Hi guys. I'm going to be buying a 10 stop ND filter and have been learning how to expose for it from a youtube tutorial.

In the tutorial he shows a conversion chart so that if for instance he's correctly exposed at shutter speed 1/1000th and ISO 100 before putting the filter on, it'll be 1 second when the filter is put on. Or if it's a different aperture and correctly exposed at1/250th, it'll be 4 seconds with the filter on. Why would I need a conversion chart though if presumably all I have to do is keep dialling the shutter speed down until I see the exposure meter correctly exposing, i.e, in the centre?

For long exposures, you'll be using a tripod and Manual Exposure mode. Adjust the exposure to "0" or whatever you want for that scene. Then, add the ND and adjust the shutter speed back to the the same EV. You don't have to calculate anything. Except for motion blur or a little contrast, the before and after are identical. All that changes is shutter speed.

Thanks BB builder. With a circular screw on ND filter, it should be possible I can smooth out sky and water in a single long exposure, as long as any visible clouds are moving quite fast?

It doesn't take much to blur water, but clouds can take minutes. They don't always move fast or in the right direction.

Rodger in Edmonton
Rodger in Edmonton Veteran Member • Posts: 3,726
Re: ND filter shutter speed conversion
1

BBbuilder467 wrote:

Merlin5 wrote:

BBbuilder467 wrote:

Merlin5 wrote:

Hi guys. I'm going to be buying a 10 stop ND filter and have been learning how to expose for it from a youtube tutorial.

In the tutorial he shows a conversion chart so that if for instance he's correctly exposed at shutter speed 1/1000th and ISO 100 before putting the filter on, it'll be 1 second when the filter is put on. Or if it's a different aperture and correctly exposed at1/250th, it'll be 4 seconds with the filter on. Why would I need a conversion chart though if presumably all I have to do is keep dialling the shutter speed down until I see the exposure meter correctly exposing, i.e, in the centre?

For long exposures, you'll be using a tripod and Manual Exposure mode. Adjust the exposure to "0" or whatever you want for that scene. Then, add the ND and adjust the shutter speed back to the the same EV. You don't have to calculate anything. Except for motion blur or a little contrast, the before and after are identical. All that changes is shutter speed.

Thanks BB builder. With a circular screw on ND filter, it should be possible I can smooth out sky and water in a single long exposure, as long as any visible clouds are moving quite fast?

It doesn't take much to blur water, but clouds can take minutes. They don't always move fast or in the right direction.

Following up on BB'c comments I have this 30s vs 88 s exposure to illustrate the effect - the water in the 30s has a pretty nice glass effect but the clouds are totally meh.

The second was much more to my mind's eye goal of the desired motion blur.

These were done with the Lee Big Stopper - 10 stop ND

* I know the EXIF tag says 30s but this is incorrect, I checked the RAW metadata twice and they are both 80s plus in duration.

88s river scene

My river and surrounding has little whitewater - I have to go to a reasonably big sized lake on a real windy day to get the beautiful white fog effect around the dock.

One thing that really helps is use the online weather tools and wait out the weather - here is another one from a bigger cloud movement day.

The best days are high cloud movement with low surface winds.

81s urban scene

-- hide signature --

Best Regards, Rodger
Save Lives - Be an Organ or Stem Cell Donor.
Quaecumque vera

OP Merlin5 Senior Member • Posts: 2,114
Re: ND filter shutter speed conversion

Rodger in Edmonton wrote:

BBbuilder467 wrote:

Merlin5 wrote:

BBbuilder467 wrote:

Merlin5 wrote:

Hi guys. I'm going to be buying a 10 stop ND filter and have been learning how to expose for it from a youtube tutorial.

In the tutorial he shows a conversion chart so that if for instance he's correctly exposed at shutter speed 1/1000th and ISO 100 before putting the filter on, it'll be 1 second when the filter is put on. Or if it's a different aperture and correctly exposed at1/250th, it'll be 4 seconds with the filter on. Why would I need a conversion chart though if presumably all I have to do is keep dialling the shutter speed down until I see the exposure meter correctly exposing, i.e, in the centre?

For long exposures, you'll be using a tripod and Manual Exposure mode. Adjust the exposure to "0" or whatever you want for that scene. Then, add the ND and adjust the shutter speed back to the the same EV. You don't have to calculate anything. Except for motion blur or a little contrast, the before and after are identical. All that changes is shutter speed.

Thanks BB builder. With a circular screw on ND filter, it should be possible I can smooth out sky and water in a single long exposure, as long as any visible clouds are moving quite fast?

It doesn't take much to blur water, but clouds can take minutes. They don't always move fast or in the right direction.

Following up on BB'c comments I have this 30s vs 88 s exposure to illustrate the effect - the water in the 30s has a pretty nice glass effect but the clouds are totally meh.

The second was much more to my mind's eye goal of the desired motion blur.

These were done with the Lee Big Stopper - 10 stop ND

* I know the EXIF tag says 30s but this is incorrect, I checked the RAW metadata twice and they are both 80s plus in duration.

88s river scene

My river and surrounding has little whitewater - I have to go to a reasonably big sized lake on a real windy day to get the beautiful white fog effect around the dock.

One thing that really helps is use the online weather tools and wait out the weather - here is another one from a bigger cloud movement day.

The best days are high cloud movement with low surface winds.

81s urban scene

Hi Rodger and thanks for the advice on the online weather tools and high cloud movement. Excellent photos, particularly like the 81s!

Since last posting in this thread, I received my ND filter. Haven't had a chance to use it that much but I took a few in May. Here's a couple. I decided to experiment and increase exposures beyond what my app was telling me and I think they worked out pretty nice.

I notice the exif says 30s, but on flickr it says 75 and 106s.

75s

106s

 Merlin5's gear list:Merlin5's gear list
Sony a6600 Sigma 16mm F1.4 DC DN (E/EF-M mounts) Sigma 56mm F1.4 DC DN Sony E 70-350mm F4.5-6.3 G OSS
Rodger in Edmonton
Rodger in Edmonton Veteran Member • Posts: 3,726
Re: ND filter shutter speed conversion
1

Merlin5 wrote:

Rodger in Edmonton wrote:

BBbuilder467 wrote:

Merlin5 wrote:

BBbuilder467 wrote:

Merlin5 wrote:

Hi guys. I'm going to be buying a 10 stop ND filter and have been learning how to expose for it from a youtube tutorial.

In the tutorial he shows a conversion chart so that if for instance he's correctly exposed at shutter speed 1/1000th and ISO 100 before putting the filter on, it'll be 1 second when the filter is put on. Or if it's a different aperture and correctly exposed at1/250th, it'll be 4 seconds with the filter on. Why would I need a conversion chart though if presumably all I have to do is keep dialling the shutter speed down until I see the exposure meter correctly exposing, i.e, in the centre?

For long exposures, you'll be using a tripod and Manual Exposure mode. Adjust the exposure to "0" or whatever you want for that scene. Then, add the ND and adjust the shutter speed back to the the same EV. You don't have to calculate anything. Except for motion blur or a little contrast, the before and after are identical. All that changes is shutter speed.

Thanks BB builder. With a circular screw on ND filter, it should be possible I can smooth out sky and water in a single long exposure, as long as any visible clouds are moving quite fast?

It doesn't take much to blur water, but clouds can take minutes. They don't always move fast or in the right direction.

Following up on BB'c comments I have this 30s vs 88 s exposure to illustrate the effect - the water in the 30s has a pretty nice glass effect but the clouds are totally meh.

The second was much more to my mind's eye goal of the desired motion blur.

These were done with the Lee Big Stopper - 10 stop ND

* I know the EXIF tag says 30s but this is incorrect, I checked the RAW metadata twice and they are both 80s plus in duration.

88s river scene

My river and surrounding has little whitewater - I have to go to a reasonably big sized lake on a real windy day to get the beautiful white fog effect around the dock.

One thing that really helps is use the online weather tools and wait out the weather - here is another one from a bigger cloud movement day.

The best days are high cloud movement with low surface winds.

81s urban scene

Hi Rodger and thanks for the advice on the online weather tools and high cloud movement. Excellent photos, particularly like the 81s!

Since last posting in this thread, I received my ND filter. Haven't had a chance to use it that much but I took a few in May. Here's a couple. I decided to experiment and increase exposures beyond what my app was telling me and I think they worked out pretty nice.

I notice the exif says 30s, but on flickr it says 75 and 106s.

75s

106s

Love them Merlin, # 2 is my fave - composition works like a charm - and a strong surreal feel like a Sherlock Holmes movie.

Glad I found your post - the big ND is something a person should do every season.

I too think the exposures are fine, cloudy days have subdues lighting and 2 captures that superbly - the brighter # 1 is fine too , I find the ND often has more mystique in B&W.

-- hide signature --

Best Regards, Rodger
Save Lives - Be an Organ or Stem Cell Donor.
Quaecumque vera

OP Merlin5 Senior Member • Posts: 2,114
Re: ND filter shutter speed conversion

Rodger in Edmonton wrote:

Merlin5 wrote:

Rodger in Edmonton wrote:

BBbuilder467 wrote:

Merlin5 wrote:

BBbuilder467 wrote:

Merlin5 wrote:

Hi guys. I'm going to be buying a 10 stop ND filter and have been learning how to expose for it from a youtube tutorial.

In the tutorial he shows a conversion chart so that if for instance he's correctly exposed at shutter speed 1/1000th and ISO 100 before putting the filter on, it'll be 1 second when the filter is put on. Or if it's a different aperture and correctly exposed at1/250th, it'll be 4 seconds with the filter on. Why would I need a conversion chart though if presumably all I have to do is keep dialling the shutter speed down until I see the exposure meter correctly exposing, i.e, in the centre?

For long exposures, you'll be using a tripod and Manual Exposure mode. Adjust the exposure to "0" or whatever you want for that scene. Then, add the ND and adjust the shutter speed back to the the same EV. You don't have to calculate anything. Except for motion blur or a little contrast, the before and after are identical. All that changes is shutter speed.

Thanks BB builder. With a circular screw on ND filter, it should be possible I can smooth out sky and water in a single long exposure, as long as any visible clouds are moving quite fast?

It doesn't take much to blur water, but clouds can take minutes. They don't always move fast or in the right direction.

Following up on BB'c comments I have this 30s vs 88 s exposure to illustrate the effect - the water in the 30s has a pretty nice glass effect but the clouds are totally meh.

The second was much more to my mind's eye goal of the desired motion blur.

These were done with the Lee Big Stopper - 10 stop ND

* I know the EXIF tag says 30s but this is incorrect, I checked the RAW metadata twice and they are both 80s plus in duration.

88s river scene

My river and surrounding has little whitewater - I have to go to a reasonably big sized lake on a real windy day to get the beautiful white fog effect around the dock.

One thing that really helps is use the online weather tools and wait out the weather - here is another one from a bigger cloud movement day.

The best days are high cloud movement with low surface winds.

81s urban scene

Hi Rodger and thanks for the advice on the online weather tools and high cloud movement. Excellent photos, particularly like the 81s!

Since last posting in this thread, I received my ND filter. Haven't had a chance to use it that much but I took a few in May. Here's a couple. I decided to experiment and increase exposures beyond what my app was telling me and I think they worked out pretty nice.

I notice the exif says 30s, but on flickr it says 75 and 106s.

75s

106s

Love them Merlin, # 2 is my fave - composition works like a charm - and a strong surreal feel like a Sherlock Holmes movie.

Glad I found your post - the big ND is something a person should do every season.

I too think the exposures are fine, cloudy days have subdues lighting and 2 captures that superbly - the brighter # 1 is fine too , I find the ND often has more mystique in B&W.

Thanks Rodger. I agree, I think black and white  looks better.  Love that you see a Sherlock Holmes vibe in the second. I never thought of that but you're right! Now that I've tried it,  I totally agree with you that an ND filter should be in every photographer's camera bag. Maybe one day I'll invest in a Lee Big Stopper system

 Merlin5's gear list:Merlin5's gear list
Sony a6600 Sigma 16mm F1.4 DC DN (E/EF-M mounts) Sigma 56mm F1.4 DC DN Sony E 70-350mm F4.5-6.3 G OSS
Rodger in Edmonton
Rodger in Edmonton Veteran Member • Posts: 3,726
Re: ND filter shutter speed conversion

Merlin5 wrote:

Rodger in Edmonton wrote:

Merlin5 wrote:

Rodger in Edmonton wrote:

BBbuilder467 wrote:

Merlin5 wrote:

BBbuilder467 wrote:

Merlin5 wrote:

Hi guys. I'm going to be buying a 10 stop ND filter and have been learning how to expose for it from a youtube tutorial.

In the tutorial he shows a conversion chart so that if for instance he's correctly exposed at shutter speed 1/1000th and ISO 100 before putting the filter on, it'll be 1 second when the filter is put on. Or if it's a different aperture and correctly exposed at1/250th, it'll be 4 seconds with the filter on. Why would I need a conversion chart though if presumably all I have to do is keep dialling the shutter speed down until I see the exposure meter correctly exposing, i.e, in the centre?

For long exposures, you'll be using a tripod and Manual Exposure mode. Adjust the exposure to "0" or whatever you want for that scene. Then, add the ND and adjust the shutter speed back to the the same EV. You don't have to calculate anything. Except for motion blur or a little contrast, the before and after are identical. All that changes is shutter speed.

Thanks BB builder. With a circular screw on ND filter, it should be possible I can smooth out sky and water in a single long exposure, as long as any visible clouds are moving quite fast?

It doesn't take much to blur water, but clouds can take minutes. They don't always move fast or in the right direction.

Following up on BB'c comments I have this 30s vs 88 s exposure to illustrate the effect - the water in the 30s has a pretty nice glass effect but the clouds are totally meh.

The second was much more to my mind's eye goal of the desired motion blur.

These were done with the Lee Big Stopper - 10 stop ND

* I know the EXIF tag says 30s but this is incorrect, I checked the RAW metadata twice and they are both 80s plus in duration.

88s river scene

My river and surrounding has little whitewater - I have to go to a reasonably big sized lake on a real windy day to get the beautiful white fog effect around the dock.

One thing that really helps is use the online weather tools and wait out the weather - here is another one from a bigger cloud movement day.

The best days are high cloud movement with low surface winds.

81s urban scene

Hi Rodger and thanks for the advice on the online weather tools and high cloud movement. Excellent photos, particularly like the 81s!

Since last posting in this thread, I received my ND filter. Haven't had a chance to use it that much but I took a few in May. Here's a couple. I decided to experiment and increase exposures beyond what my app was telling me and I think they worked out pretty nice.

I notice the exif says 30s, but on flickr it says 75 and 106s.

75s

106s

Love them Merlin, # 2 is my fave - composition works like a charm - and a strong surreal feel like a Sherlock Holmes movie.

Glad I found your post - the big ND is something a person should do every season.

I too think the exposures are fine, cloudy days have subdues lighting and 2 captures that superbly - the brighter # 1 is fine too , I find the ND often has more mystique in B&W.

Thanks Rodger. I agree, I think black and white looks better. Love that you see a Sherlock Holmes vibe in the second. I never thought of that but you're right! Now that I've tried it, I totally agree with you that an ND filter should be in every photographer's camera bag. Maybe one day I'll invest in a Lee Big Stopper system

Hi Merlin - hang tough on a Lee system - one still has to buy an adapter so it gets a vignette anyway and I am not sure any added image effects outweigh the process of putting on the adapter, mounting the bracket and inserting the glass.

... and one always worries about butterfingers - many stories of a Big Stopper meeting its end on rocks.

If you asked me what system you fine imagery was taken with Lee or screw on - I would have no idea - a coin flip.

-- hide signature --

Best Regards, Rodger
Save Lives - Be an Organ or Stem Cell Donor.
Quaecumque vera

OP Merlin5 Senior Member • Posts: 2,114
Re: ND filter shutter speed conversion

Rodger in Edmonton wrote:

Merlin5 wrote:

Rodger in Edmonton wrote:

Merlin5 wrote:

Rodger in Edmonton wrote:

BBbuilder467 wrote:

Merlin5 wrote:

BBbuilder467 wrote:

Merlin5 wrote:

Hi guys. I'm going to be buying a 10 stop ND filter and have been learning how to expose for it from a youtube tutorial.

In the tutorial he shows a conversion chart so that if for instance he's correctly exposed at shutter speed 1/1000th and ISO 100 before putting the filter on, it'll be 1 second when the filter is put on. Or if it's a different aperture and correctly exposed at1/250th, it'll be 4 seconds with the filter on. Why would I need a conversion chart though if presumably all I have to do is keep dialling the shutter speed down until I see the exposure meter correctly exposing, i.e, in the centre?

For long exposures, you'll be using a tripod and Manual Exposure mode. Adjust the exposure to "0" or whatever you want for that scene. Then, add the ND and adjust the shutter speed back to the the same EV. You don't have to calculate anything. Except for motion blur or a little contrast, the before and after are identical. All that changes is shutter speed.

Thanks BB builder. With a circular screw on ND filter, it should be possible I can smooth out sky and water in a single long exposure, as long as any visible clouds are moving quite fast?

It doesn't take much to blur water, but clouds can take minutes. They don't always move fast or in the right direction.

Following up on BB'c comments I have this 30s vs 88 s exposure to illustrate the effect - the water in the 30s has a pretty nice glass effect but the clouds are totally meh.

The second was much more to my mind's eye goal of the desired motion blur.

These were done with the Lee Big Stopper - 10 stop ND

* I know the EXIF tag says 30s but this is incorrect, I checked the RAW metadata twice and they are both 80s plus in duration.

88s river scene

My river and surrounding has little whitewater - I have to go to a reasonably big sized lake on a real windy day to get the beautiful white fog effect around the dock.

One thing that really helps is use the online weather tools and wait out the weather - here is another one from a bigger cloud movement day.

The best days are high cloud movement with low surface winds.

81s urban scene

Hi Rodger and thanks for the advice on the online weather tools and high cloud movement. Excellent photos, particularly like the 81s!

Since last posting in this thread, I received my ND filter. Haven't had a chance to use it that much but I took a few in May. Here's a couple. I decided to experiment and increase exposures beyond what my app was telling me and I think they worked out pretty nice.

I notice the exif says 30s, but on flickr it says 75 and 106s.

75s

106s

Love them Merlin, # 2 is my fave - composition works like a charm - and a strong surreal feel like a Sherlock Holmes movie.

Glad I found your post - the big ND is something a person should do every season.

I too think the exposures are fine, cloudy days have subdues lighting and 2 captures that superbly - the brighter # 1 is fine too , I find the ND often has more mystique in B&W.

Thanks Rodger. I agree, I think black and white looks better. Love that you see a Sherlock Holmes vibe in the second. I never thought of that but you're right! Now that I've tried it, I totally agree with you that an ND filter should be in every photographer's camera bag. Maybe one day I'll invest in a Lee Big Stopper system

Hi Merlin - hang tough on a Lee system - one still has to buy an adapter so it gets a vignette anyway and I am not sure any added image effects outweigh the process of putting on the adapter, mounting the bracket and inserting the glass.

... and one always worries about butterfingers - many stories of a Big Stopper meeting its end on rocks.

If you asked me what system you fine imagery was taken with Lee or screw on - I would have no idea - a coin flip.

Good points Rodger! And yes, with the expense of that Big Stopper glass and remembering how I once very nearly dropped my round filter when screwing it on,  I'll just stick with what I have.

 Merlin5's gear list:Merlin5's gear list
Sony a6600 Sigma 16mm F1.4 DC DN (E/EF-M mounts) Sigma 56mm F1.4 DC DN Sony E 70-350mm F4.5-6.3 G OSS
pmgnut
pmgnut Regular Member • Posts: 423
Re: ND filter shutter speed conversion
1

These are incredibly fun to play and experiment with. Got mine not long ago, a 10 stop URTH brand. Does what it's supposed to do, not too expensive, comes in a nice metal case, although the metal rim on the filter is a bit on the thin side and can be tricky to handle .

 pmgnut's gear list:pmgnut's gear list
Nikon D750 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G VR Nikon AF-S Micro-Nikkor 105mm F2.8G IF-ED VR Nikon AF-S Nikkor 50mm F1.8G Nikon AF-S Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G ED
OP Merlin5 Senior Member • Posts: 2,114
Re: ND filter shutter speed conversion
1

pmgnut wrote:

These are incredibly fun to play and experiment with. Got mine not long ago, a 10 stop URTH brand. Does what it's supposed to do, not too expensive, comes in a nice metal case, although the metal rim on the filter is a bit on the thin side and can be tricky to handle .

Yeah, nearly dropped mine a couple of times while screwing on or off the lens. I hold my other hand underneath now just in case it might slip.

 Merlin5's gear list:Merlin5's gear list
Sony a6600 Sigma 16mm F1.4 DC DN (E/EF-M mounts) Sigma 56mm F1.4 DC DN Sony E 70-350mm F4.5-6.3 G OSS
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads