Industrial photography

Started 6 months ago | Discussions
brucet
brucet Veteran Member • Posts: 3,889
Industrial photography
1

I've always been interested in industrial photos. Bulldozers. Mining equipment. Road and rail transport. Mines, smelters, construction etc etc.

I'm wondering if there is such a thing as an industrial photographer. Someone who takes industrial PR images. I would like to have a crack at it. But is there already a market?

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BrianYarvin
BrianYarvin Contributing Member • Posts: 585
Re: Industrial photography
3

Bruce, how can their not be! All of those high-ticket items are sold with beautiful brochures, lavish advertising, and even more impressive annual reports. That being said, this is one of those photography businesses where clients have really deep pockets and even deeper knowledge of what they want.

Spend some time looking at the websites of those who thrive in this market - the people who shoot for Volvo, New Holland, and the dozens of other similar companies and see what they're getting right now.

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Ed Shapiro
Ed Shapiro Contributing Member • Posts: 558
Re: Industrial photography
4

Yes! Industrial photography is indeed a time-honored aspect of commercial, corporate and advertising and public relations photography.

Many large corporations, at one point in time had in-house photograhy departments. Nowadays the trend is for companies to farm out the work as required. A significant percentage of my commercial assignments are in the industrial field.

Most of this work is done on location in factories, excavation and construction job sites, power generating plants, and just about any place where work is in progress. Photograph are used in annual reports, brochures, trade show displays, corporate and trade publications, press releases to newspapers, magazines and broadcast media, and educational and instructional power-point production.

You will have to generate business by creating a basic portfolio and searching out clients. I started my industrial department by displaying my work at various trade shows, approaching advertising agencies, making contact with the management of industries in my city, construction companies, dealers and renter of cranes and heavy equipment.

The jobs require a wide range of photographic skill sets, the ability to work under oftentimes difficult conditions under a wide range of available and set-up lighting scenarios. Besides managing you gear, you need to be apprised of safety equipmet and procedures in industrial environments. The work is extremely interesting- you learn about old and new technologies every day.

Some assignments are documentary in nature- kinda like photojournalism. Others require your creativity in making rather mundane subjects like big dirty, and ugly equipmet look exciting and dynamic.

During the past year, waht withthe pandemic, my industrial work on job sites kept my business alive. Even durig lock-downs, construction sites were still allowed to continue in an out-of-doors environment.

Start off bu making a list of the industries in your area and begin investigating ther requirements. Some of the companies I approached di not use photograhy in ther adverting and public relations but I was able to convince them to use some imagery in these efforts. Many have becom steady clients for industrial work as well as product photograhy and corporate portraiture.

Good luck!

Ed Shapiro- Commercial and Portrait Photographer. Ottawa, Ontario Canada

Clyde Thomas Senior Member • Posts: 1,668
Re: Industrial photography
1

brucet wrote:

I've always been interested in industrial photos. Bulldozers. Mining equipment. Road and rail transport. Mines, smelters, construction etc etc.

I'm wondering if there is such a thing as an industrial photographer. Someone who takes industrial PR images. I would like to have a crack at it. But is there already a market?

Yes I do a lot. The "industry" is vast, and includes A.I., climate, communications, infrastructure, health, robotics, manufacturing, etc... And one bleeds into the other. The bioscience lab in Kansas uses a microscope manufactured in California, which is constructed of parts made in Arkansas, and shipped by a Illinois trucking company, with vehicles built in North Carolina. Industrial photography style is similar to Utilities photography style.

Google search: "Your State Name" + "Whatever category" listed above that you're interested in shooting. Be ready to do both stills and video, including head shots and talking head interviews.

Each "Industry" has it's own special lingo that you'll pick up as you go along.

You'd be surprised at some of the specialties. You might find a metal fabricator that specializes building corn silos. Another that manufactures all the parts to build a toolbox, but sends to another facility for assembly... Or they might do the whole thing. A plastics company that specializes in food services will be different than one specializing in cybersecurity.

Look around at every little thing that you see in the manufactured world, the base of your bar stool, the knob on your kitchen cabinet, the steps on your ladder... They were all manufactured somewhere.

At the Industry level, these companies practically never need visuals for advertising. They use visuals for web site, brochures, public relations, direct marketing and sales.

Best to hook up with a Marketing firm in your area that specializes in one of the categories listed above. Court them, because the industry will use whatever photo/video provider that they recommend. They probably won't be interested in dealing with a videophotog directly unless you are providing full blown marketing strategies too.

Google search: "Your State Name" + NIST MEP and get ready to understand concepts of ISO Certifications, Lifecycle Analysis, Value Stream Mapping, Energy Audit, Food Safety, etc... https://www.nist.gov/

NIST - National Institute of Standards and Technology

MEP - MEP is a public-private partnership with Centers in all 50 states and Puerto Rico dedicated to serving small and medium-sized manufacturers. Last year, MEP Centers interacted with 27,574 manufacturers, leading to $13.0 billion in sales, $2.7 billion in cost savings, $4.9 billion in new client investments, and helped create or retain 105,748 jobs.

Good luck!

Here's a sample from one of my Metal Fab clients... https://lrind.com/

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Clyde Thomas Senior Member • Posts: 1,668
Re: Industrial photography
1

Ed Shapiro wrote:

The jobs require a wide range of photographic skill sets...

Good post and photos Ed.

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jlafferty Senior Member • Posts: 1,413
Re: Industrial photography
1

Of course. Here's a friend of mine who's excellent:

https://carynorton.com/

I've had the good fortune to shoot some of this stuff, and was flown to Japan to document the installation of an 80 ton metal press for fine industrial manufacturing. Was an amazing experience.

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brucet
OP brucet Veteran Member • Posts: 3,889
Re: Industrial photography

jlafferty wrote:

Of course. Here's a friend of mine who's excellent:

https://carynorton.com/

I've had the good fortune to shoot some of this stuff, and was flown to Japan to document the installation of an 80 ton metal press for fine industrial manufacturing. Was an amazing experience.

Thanks everyone. jlafferty thanks for the link.

It seems there is a wider target market than I had envisioned.

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Charlie BRM
Charlie BRM Regular Member • Posts: 126
Re: Industrial photography
3

I spent years doing videography and editing for industrial projects. Usually my clients were the equipment designers and manufacturers and they needed me in the field to portray the new models in action. I actually mean "in the field" because a major part was sod harvesting equipment, park and fairway mowers with up to 11 mower heads wide that folded up behind the tractor like transformer toys to fit through shed doors, etc.
Transport truck modifications for specific loads. Images and video for training sessions, trade shows and conventions. I solved a lot of requirements for those companies.

It's quite a bit different than photography where you are setting up a scene, placing lighting and backdrops 'just so' to get the perfect shot for an ad. What these clients like is someone who has their head on a swivel around operating equipment, doesn't get in the way of the operators and can adapt on the fly. As well as possible, taking video or stills that explain how the thing works is more important than how it looks.

I also spent two years in an auto parts machining factory on the line, done heavy landscaping, construction, demolition, drywall, etc. and my first job out of university was marketing in North America for a mining company so that all helps me comprehend and fit in so everyone is more comfortable with the camera guy invading their work space.

For the right type this is an alternative to pursue. A gear head with a trigger finger.

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BAK Forum Pro • Posts: 25,636
Re: Industrial photography

Do you feel your question has been answered?

RE >> I'm wondering if there is such a thing as an industrial photographer. Someone who takes industrial PR images. <<

I've been a multitasking, journalist pr man and business photographer since 1966.

Several points:

a/ In all that time, only about half a dozen photographers have pitched me in my role as a PR practitioner.

My point here is that PR people are good prospects, and photographers do not do a good job of pitching us.

b/ in my job as an editor or production manager of several trade or industrial magazines, many PR people gave me handout stories with pictures that were taken by construction workers, or by photographers hired by construction companies.

c/ magazine editors of then take their own pictures.

d/ the editor of a magazine for which I  was production manager knew I was a photographer, and he assigned his assistant editor and I to go to the Athasbaska Oil Sands (Fort McMurray) and several power plants in the Rocky mountains .

e/ when working as a PR consultant to the PR director for the company that makes polio vaccine, we decided to create a company-wide collection of pictures.

If you offered this same idea to dozens of pr directors, some might bite. Pick industrial-oriented companies, if this is what you want to shoot.
BAK

Ed Shapiro
Ed Shapiro Contributing Member • Posts: 558
Re: Industrial photography
1

BAK wrote:

Do you feel your question has been answered?

RE >> I'm wondering if there is such a thing as an industrial photographer. Someone who takes industrial PR images. <<

I've been a multitasking, journalist pr man and business photographer since 1966.

Several points:

a/ In all that time, only about half a dozen photographers have pitched me in my role as a PR practitioner.

My point here is that PR people are good prospects, and photographers do not do a good job of pitching us.

b/ in my job as an editor or production manager of several trade or industrial magazines, many PR people gave me handout stories with pictures that were taken by construction workers, or by photographers hired by construction companies.

c/ magazine editors of then take their own pictures.

d/ the editor of a magazine for which I was production manager knew I was a photographer, and he assigned his assistant editor and I to go to the Athasbaska Oil Sands (Fort McMurray) and several power plants in the Rocky mountains .

e/ when working as a PR consultant to the PR director for the company that makes polio vaccine, we decided to create a company-wide collection of pictures.

If you offered this same idea to dozens of pr directors, some might bite. Pick industrial-oriented companies, if this is what you want to shoot.
BAK

Yes!  ther is such specializations as industrial photography. I offer it as one of the services of my commercial photography business.

In past eras, man big corporations had their now in-house photographic and audio visual departments.  The photographers continuously supplied images of annual reports, advertising, internal training, documentation and a raft of public relations applications. The Professional Photographers of America had and possibly still operate a section for industrial photographers.  The head of that section, some years ago, was the in-house photographer for the Hughs Tool and Die Corp. and served as international president for a term.

Nowadays, many corporations outsource this work, some through agencies and others directly. I get clients for both sources.  The work is done in factories, plants, smelting operations, construction job sites, and ranges from a wide variety of heavy and light industries.  Usually, the subjects are people and machinery at work, different manufacturing and construction operations, just about anything that can happen in a factory or job site that is worthy of recording or public relations or interest. I photojournalist, good commercial shooter or even an alert and savvy wedding and event shooter can adapt his or her techniques to industrial photography. Sometimes the work is in a dirty, messy, perhaps even mildly dangerous place or perhaps in a pristine "clean room- in both cases you need to suit up for the job. It is not for the faint of heart or those with a fear of heights, stepladders, cherry pickers and other elevating devices.  You may need a hazmat suit, safety work boots and protective clothing, protective eyewear and a hard hat.

The work is extremely interesting, sometimes a bit challenging, and pays well!

Ed Shapiro- Commercial and Portrait Photographer. Ottawa, Ontario Canada

brucet
OP brucet Veteran Member • Posts: 3,889
Re: Industrial photography

I think there needs to be a distinction of sorts with the OP. Small 'local' industries v 'multi national' industries. Multi nationals are a whole nuther question with a whole set of different requirements and approaches involving agents. Smaller 'local' industries are often in house and don't use agents as such.

In my case I had a multinational approach me after seeing my work on the net. Lucky me. But my 'small' work has come about by me approaching smaller clients.

FWIW the multi national screwed me. The smaller industries have been a pleasure to work with. And way more profitable.

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Ed Shapiro
Ed Shapiro Contributing Member • Posts: 558
Re: Industrial photography
1

brucet wrote:

I think there needs to be a distinction of sorts with the OP. Small 'local' industries v 'multi national' industries. Multi nationals are a whole nuther question with a whole set of different requirements and approaches involving agents. Smaller 'local' industries are often in house and don't use agents as such.

In my case I had a multinational approach me after seeing my work on the net. Lucky me. But my 'small' work has come about by me approaching smaller clients.

FWIW the multi national screwed me. The smaller industries have been a pleasure to work with. And way more profitable.

I have a mix.  I serve lots of small companies and a few big ones.  I have never had issues with any of them.

I like the big companies for annual report work.  Someof them have big budgets for these publications because not only are the  financial reports but are used to attract investments and the wanna look good. They have big budgets for printing and the printing houses encourage good photography.  I get to hoot products, industrial scenarios and executive portraits.

Perhaps I am fortunate to have never been "screwed".  I work by contract and all the protective stipulations are included.  The transfer of reproduction rights do not occur until the invoices are paid.

The smaller businesses don't have giant budgets but there are enough small jobs to help boost my bottom line.

Running any business is not a "piece of cake", there are always some problems, lots of long hours and many aspects that are not fun and creative in nature-  like accounting, taxes, paperwork, and maintaining a kinda high overhead.  The photography business can be especially difficult at times buses in many cases, it is not a necessity but a luxury service.  That is who it is good to diversify and if one market declines, you have other opportunities to fall back on.

Keep up the hard work, my friend.  Don't let the big-business guy get the best of you- we all gotta keep the wolves away from the door- Be well!

Ed Shapiro- Commercial and Portrait Photographer. Ottawa, Ontario Canada

brucet
OP brucet Veteran Member • Posts: 3,889
Re: Industrial photography

Ed Shapiro wrote:

brucet wrote:

I think there needs to be a distinction of sorts with the OP. Small 'local' industries v 'multi national' industries. Multi nationals are a whole nuther question with a whole set of different requirements and approaches involving agents. Smaller 'local' industries are often in house and don't use agents as such.

In my case I had a multinational approach me after seeing my work on the net. Lucky me. But my 'small' work has come about by me approaching smaller clients.

FWIW the multi national screwed me. The smaller industries have been a pleasure to work with. And way more profitable.

I have a mix. I serve lots of small companies and a few big ones. I have never had issues with any of them.

I like the big companies for annual report work. Someof them have big budgets for these publications because not only are the financial reports but are used to attract investments and the wanna look good. They have big budgets for printing and the printing houses encourage good photography. I get to hoot products, industrial scenarios and executive portraits.

Perhaps I am fortunate to have never been "screwed". I work by contract and all the protective stipulations are included. The transfer of reproduction rights do not occur until the invoices are paid.

The smaller businesses don't have giant budgets but there are enough small jobs to help boost my bottom line.

Running any business is not a "piece of cake", there are always some problems, lots of long hours and many aspects that are not fun and creative in nature- like accounting, taxes, paperwork, and maintaining a kinda high overhead. The photography business can be especially difficult at times buses in many cases, it is not a necessity but a luxury service. That is who it is good to diversify and if one market declines, you have other opportunities to fall back on.

Keep up the hard work, my friend. Don't let the big-business guy get the best of you- we all gotta keep the wolves away from the door- Be well!

Ed Shapiro- Commercial and Portrait Photographer. Ottawa, Ontario Canada

Just to clarify my 'screwed' comment. I was contacted by a large multinational. Their USA based HQ. They wanted one of my images for a pair of calendars. One wall and one desk top version. They asked me for a price. Before I responded they got back to me with a 'take it or leave it' offer. US$750.00 for a print run of up to 4 million copies. I know what these firms pay and the choices they have. So the money wasn't the issue.

We signed a contract with a clause that I had inserted and they agreed to. "No editing whatsoever without my written consent". Some weeks later I got a few copies sent to me. Heavily edited. The image was a one which depicted 100 year old boxes with company logos on them. Every logo was edited out. And done by the office boy that was a very low quality edit. I contacted them and their response was, "take it up with our lawyers".

Lesson learned.

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Ed Shapiro
Ed Shapiro Contributing Member • Posts: 558
Re: Industrial photography

brucet wrote:

Ed Shapiro wrote:

brucet wrote:

I think there needs to be a distinction of sorts with the OP. Small 'local' industries v 'multi national' industries. Multi nationals are a whole nuther question with a whole set of different requirements and approaches involving agents. Smaller 'local' industries are often in house and don't use agents as such.

In my case I had a multinational approach me after seeing my work on the net. Lucky me. But my 'small' work has come about by me approaching smaller clients.

FWIW the multi national screwed me. The smaller industries have been a pleasure to work with. And way more profitable.

I have a mix. I serve lots of small companies and a few big ones. I have never had issues with any of them.

I like the big companies for annual report work. Someof them have big budgets for these publications because not only are the financial reports but are used to attract investments and the wanna look good. They have big budgets for printing and the printing houses encourage good photography. I get to hoot products, industrial scenarios and executive portraits.

Perhaps I am fortunate to have never been "screwed". I work by contract and all the protective stipulations are included. The transfer of reproduction rights do not occur until the invoices are paid.

The smaller businesses don't have giant budgets but there are enough small jobs to help boost my bottom line.

Running any business is not a "piece of cake", there are always some problems, lots of long hours and many aspects that are not fun and creative in nature- like accounting, taxes, paperwork, and maintaining a kinda high overhead. The photography business can be especially difficult at times buses in many cases, it is not a necessity but a luxury service. That is who it is good to diversify and if one market declines, you have other opportunities to fall back on.

Keep up the hard work, my friend. Don't let the big-business guy get the best of you- we all gotta keep the wolves away from the door- Be well!

Ed Shapiro- Commercial and Portrait Photographer. Ottawa, Ontario Canada

Just to clarify my 'screwed' comment. I was contacted by a large multinational. Their USA based HQ. They wanted one of my images for a pair of calendars. One wall and one desk top version. They asked me for a price. Before I responded they got back to me with a 'take it or leave it' offer. US$750.00 for a print run of up to 4 million copies. I know what these firms pay and the choices they have. So the money wasn't the issue.

We signed a contract with a clause that I had inserted and they agreed to. "No editing whatsoever without my written consent". Some weeks later I got a few copies sent to me. Heavily edited. The image was a one which depicted 100 year old boxes with company logos on them. Every logo was edited out. And done by the office boy that was a very low quality edit. I contacted them and their response was, "take it up with our lawyers".

Lesson learned.

Not nice, to say the least!   In my own case, I usually do not sell my personal "art" images to corporate clients.  I usually am hired by the company or their agencies to do a specific assignment. If the images are gonna be used as is or altered in the process of completing the project, all of that is worked out and known in advance.  It's all part of the layout or the original concept.  If a logo or copy is gonna be inserted or superimposed over the image, we leave negative space for it.   Most of the work is for advertising, packaging and sales or investment promotion so all kinds of graphics are expected.

Ed Shapiro- Commercial and Portrait Photographer. Ottawa, Ontario Canada

ashleymorrison
ashleymorrison Senior Member • Posts: 1,308
Re: Industrial photography

brucet wrote:

We signed a contract with a clause that I had inserted and they agreed to. "No editing whatsoever without my written consent".

Did they present you with 'the contract' or did you present them with 'the contract'?

And did you both actually sign it after you inserted the clause?

-

Normally if someone asked me for a price, I would send them a Quote first - which would simply be for a licence to use my images.

So neither of us would actually need to sign anything beforehand - however they would obviously need to sign a cheque afterwards, should they want to use my images for what had been agreed to.

Sometimes they would send me what they would call a 'Commissioning Form' and they would ask me to sign that and return it - but I never do - because that is just a 'Purchase Order' or the Advertiser's reference, as far as I'm concerned, which I obviously don’t need to sign or return to them - because like I said before, I would just be asking them to pay me for a licence to use my images.

So I'm wondering what is it you asked them to sign or what it was that they asked you to sign here... and also why it was needed in this case!!

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Cheers
Ashley

brucet
OP brucet Veteran Member • Posts: 3,889
Re: Industrial photography

ashleymorrison wrote:

brucet wrote:

We signed a contract with a clause that I had inserted and they agreed to. "No editing whatsoever without my written consent".

Did they present you with 'the contract' or did you present them with 'the contract'?

And did you both actually sign it after you inserted the clause?

-

Normally if someone asked me for a price, I would send them a Quote first - which would simply be for a licence to use my images.

So neither of us would actually need to sign anything beforehand - however they would obviously need to sign a cheque afterwards, should they want to use my images for what had been agreed to.

Sometimes they would send me what they would call a 'Commissioning Form' and they would ask me to sign that and return it - but I never do - because that is just a 'Purchase Order' or the Advertiser's reference, as far as I'm concerned, which I obviously don’t need to sign or return to them - because like I said before, I would just be asking them to pay me for a licence to use my images.

So I'm wondering what is it you asked them to sign or what it was that they asked you to sign here... and also why it was needed in this case!!

They presented me with the contract. I asked for the 'editing' condition to be inserted. They sent back an amended contract. We both signed it. The image included some cardboard boxes with a certain company logo on them from the 1920's. That company still exists.

My guess is that their lawyers got involved and insisted on the editing. They basically said to me that legal action would cost way more than I could ever hope to recover. They are right. So I went no further.

I'm assuming that 'one' lawyer was spooked by the logos. They then went with his/her opinion.

I'm just putting it down to a multinational using bullying tactics. Live and learn.

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ashleymorrison
ashleymorrison Senior Member • Posts: 1,308
Re: Industrial photography

brucet wrote:

ashleymorrison wrote:

brucet wrote:

We signed a contract with a clause that I had inserted and they agreed to. "No editing whatsoever without my written consent".

Did they present you with 'the contract' or did you present them with 'the contract'?

And did you both actually sign it after you inserted the clause?

They presented me with the contract. I asked for the 'editing' condition to be inserted. They sent back an amended contract. We both signed it. The image included some cardboard boxes with a certain company logo on them from the 1920's. That company still exists.

My guess is that their lawyers got involved and insisted on the editing. They basically said to me that legal action would cost way more than I could ever hope to recover. They are right. So I went no further.

I'm assuming that 'one' lawyer was spooked by the logos. They then went with his/her opinion.

I'm just putting it down to a multinational using bullying tactics. Live and learn.

So if they had told to you that they needed to remove the logos, what would you have said?

And was the company who's logo that was on the cardboard boxes from the 1920's, paying you or did you have some sort of contract with them?

I sure would love to see a copy of 'the contract' that you both signed - because it sounds like they just sent you a Purchase Order, which you didn't actually need to sign and return, but would possibly need to reference on your Invoice and on the Licence to use document.

The Advertiser's reference:

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Ashley

brucet
OP brucet Veteran Member • Posts: 3,889
Re: Industrial photography

ashleymorrison wrote:

brucet wrote:

ashleymorrison wrote:

brucet wrote:

We signed a contract with a clause that I had inserted and they agreed to. "No editing whatsoever without my written consent".

Did they present you with 'the contract' or did you present them with 'the contract'?

And did you both actually sign it after you inserted the clause?

-

Normally if someone asked me for a price, I would send them a Quote first - which would simply be for a licence to use my images.

So neither of us would actually need to sign anything beforehand - however they would obviously need to sign a cheque afterwards, should they want to use my images for what had been agreed to.

Sometimes they would send me what they would call a 'Commissioning Form' and they would ask me to sign that and return it - but I never do - because that is just a 'Purchase Order' or the Advertiser's reference, as far as I'm concerned, which I obviously don’t need to sign or return to them - because like I said before, I would just be asking them to pay me for a licence to use my images.

So I'm wondering what is it you asked them to sign or what it was that they asked you to sign here... and also why it was needed in this case!!

They presented me with the contract. I asked for the 'editing' condition to be inserted. They sent back an amended contract. We both signed it. The image included some cardboard boxes with a certain company logo on them from the 1920's. That company still exists.

My guess is that their lawyers got involved and insisted on the editing. They basically said to me that legal action would cost way more than I could ever hope to recover. They are right. So I went no further.

I'm assuming that 'one' lawyer was spooked by the logos. They then went with his/her opinion.

I'm just putting it down to a multinational using bullying tactics. Live and learn.

So if they had told to you that they needed to remove the logos, what would you have said?

And was the company who's logo that was on the cardboard boxes from the 1920's, paying you or did you have some sort of deal with them?

I sure would love to see a copy of 'the contract' that you both signed - because it sounds to me, like it was a worthless piece of paper.

Yes I would have 'removed' the logos if asked to do so.

The logos belonged to a company from the 1920's. It still exists but has changed hands a number of time. The contract was between me and the multi national. The image was captured in a museum and I got a release from them to use the image.

Here's a small cropped version of the image. You will see a certain  motorbike companies old logos. My understanding is that company is/was quick to protect it's name by using lawyers. Or o I was told.

Keep in mind this was approx 5 years ago. Yes and I agree that the paper was worthless.

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ashleymorrison
ashleymorrison Senior Member • Posts: 1,308
Re: Industrial photography

brucet wrote:

ashleymorrison wrote:

brucet wrote:

ashleymorrison wrote:

brucet wrote:

We signed a contract with a clause that I had inserted and they agreed to. "No editing whatsoever without my written consent".

Did they present you with 'the contract' or did you present them with 'the contract'?

And did you both actually sign it after you inserted the clause?

They presented me with the contract. I asked for the 'editing' condition to be inserted. They sent back an amended contract. We both signed it. The image included some cardboard boxes with a certain company logo on them from the 1920's. That company still exists.

I'm just putting it down to a multinational using bullying tactics. Live and learn.

So if they had told to you that they needed to remove the logos, what would you have said?

Yes I would have 'removed' the logos if asked to do so.

Where you wanting paid more to do this - or what other difference would there have been between you removing the logos and them removing the logos?

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Cheers
Ashley

brucet
OP brucet Veteran Member • Posts: 3,889
Re: Industrial photography

ashleymorrison wrote:

brucet wrote:

ashleymorrison wrote:

brucet wrote:

ashleymorrison wrote:

brucet wrote:

We signed a contract with a clause that I had inserted and they agreed to. "No editing whatsoever without my written consent".

Did they present you with 'the contract' or did you present them with 'the contract'?

And did you both actually sign it after you inserted the clause?

They presented me with the contract. I asked for the 'editing' condition to be inserted. They sent back an amended contract. We both signed it. The image included some cardboard boxes with a certain company logo on them from the 1920's. That company still exists.

I'm just putting it down to a multinational using bullying tactics. Live and learn.

So if they had told to you that they needed to remove the logos, what would you have said?

Yes I would have 'removed' the logos if asked to do so.

Where you wanting paid more to do this - or what other difference would there have been between you removing the logos and them removing the logos?

If they had asked me I would have removed the logos. The way they removed them was by simply putting a block of colour over them. Rather than any attempt of blending in their edit was very obvious.

No big deal. The calendar went all over the world. There were credits for the photographs. More money would have been nice but I was fully aware of what they may offer. In the end it was a bit of an 'ego' trip to know my image was used. But it never made any differences to my fame or fortune!!!

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