**FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**

Started 4 months ago | User reviews
Dale108
Dale108 Veteran Member • Posts: 9,137
Re: FZ330 as Swiss Army Knife?
2

The FZ300 (330) may be the Swiss Army Knife of cameras.  It can be used for wildlife, close ups, you name it.  As a former owner of the Fz200, what really makes the FZ300 so useful includes:

  1. Larger viewfinder that is a joy to use.
  2. Weather sealing that will allow shooting in the elements
  3. Touch screen

Of course the 25-600mm f2.8 lens has not been duplicated by another company and is the heart of the camera.

If a person had to have one camera on deserted island, this would be it.

Dale

Stevie Boy Blue wrote:

Please note that this is an addition to the original and extensive review of the FZ330 that I compiled back in October 2019. See here:

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/63244070

Primarily this extension is born of a response to a question posed by DPR’s Barney Britton to Yosuke Yamane, director of Panasonic’s Imaging Division, in an interview published on March 30th 2021:

Asked whether there is still a market for compact cameras (under which bridge models like the FZ330 fall)? Mr. Yamane indicated that, although the Covid-19 damaged digital camera market was now recovering, interest in compacts is shrinking whilst demand for mirrorless models has grown steadily. With video production and live streaming demands diversified, he predicts the role of mirrorless cameras will continue to expand.

Hence, although he doesn’t state that Panasonic’s range of compacts (and FZ cameras) have no future, Mr. Yamane does admit the company will continue to strengthen full-frame and M4/3rd systems, thereby at least implying what many of us have suspected for a good while now. Yep, I believe it’s now fair and possibly accurate to presume that Panasonic’s development of compact cameras, including FZs – and especially those with pinhead 1/2.3 sensors – has been well and truly shelved for the foreseeable future at least. Perhaps 1-inch sensor models aside, could it even be that the FZ330 is the last camera of its kind that we’ll ever see from the company?

Hmmm, imagine if that were true rather than merely my own fairly justifiable assumption. Where exactly would it leave FZ fans like me and countless others who have bought and enjoyed this range of camera for many years?

Well, although I can’t and wouldn’t attempt to speak for all, as one of this range’s biggest and most longstanding fans, a shelved developmental line actually does not affect or bother me in the slightest – at least beyond postponing the excitement I always felt at the prospect of a brand new release/purchase.

That’s because the FZ330 will always be the FZ330 and nothing less. It remains in production with no sign whatsoever of being phased out any time soon. It just might never be upgraded. But logically, would that be such a bad thing when you can still buy one that rolled off the production line as recently as last month or next, and the one after that if you continue to wait as long as you like?

Despite it being in its 6th (yes sixth) year of production, the FZ330 is no less the absolutely superb camera today than it was when released back in 2015. Its 25mm to 600mm F2.8 aperture lens has still never been surpassed or even equalled by any other manufacturer.

It takes astonishingly good photographs for any camera in its class – of course within the limits of its tiny sensor. It’s splash and dust resistant, shoots 4K video and has a fast burst rate for capturing stills of action sequences. All in all and in my personal opinion, the FZ330 is the best camera of its kind made by any manufacturer, not just Panasonic but all of those so-called bigger brands, too. In the 1/2.3 sensor category, even in 2021 THE FZ330 REMAINS KING OF ALL BRIDGE CAMERAS for the money we pay. Nothing else comes remotely close to it.

And so, to remind some whilst enlightening others to the camera’s sheer versatility, I submit the following image examples for readers’ to view. Please note that although all photos have been resized and/or cropped for uploading through a relatively slow internet connection, they are all Jpegs as they appeared straight out of the camera. Note that I’ve also included my settings, too. (See the relevant illustration for that particular revelation, one which I first published way back in 2015.)

I do not shoot RAW and I rarely post process any image that I do not print. These are OOC Jpegs resized, just like all those examples in my first review.

In the main, those initial shots in the first review were indicators of the camera’s potential as mainly a wildlife tool when we can get close enough to fill as much as the frame as possible with the subject. That is and always will be key to rendering fine fur and feather detail on pinhead sensors that simply do not afford the crop-ability of larger sensors such as M4/3rd or bigger.

This latest set is more to outline what the camera is capable of as a do-it-all, carry everywhere prospect that shows little limitations when kept under ISO 800 and where light levels are at least reasonable to very good. Remember, at the end of the day, this is a bridge camera with a small sensor. In many respects it has the means to surprise or even stun us with the quality of image it can produce, particularly in capable hands and when set up optimally. But if you require professional levels of consistency across the board at all times, maybe you’ll need a model with a much larger sensor for a much larger price.

As I have already said, for the money, the FZ330’s top of all in its class. If you want the very best camera of all, then you’ll be shelling out thousands rather than hundreds and are sure to be changing lenses for all manner of things that the FZ330 can muster minus such inconveniences. As ever, the choice is yours.

But you can rest assured that despite every incarnation of smart phone representing another nail in the coffin of most compact cameras, the FZ300 is simply too versatile a machine to fall victim to the mainstream trends. On the contrary, I’ve had it confirmed by no less than five respected UK retailers in the last few days that the FZ330 remains a very popular seller indeed. I’m in no way surprised by that.

All in all, the FZ330 is as good a camera today as it was when released almost six years ago. That is just how far ahead of its time it was back in 2015. And if it’s the last small sensor FZ flagship model we ever get to appreciate, many of us will be celebrating it as one of Panasonic’s greatest ever achievements for years to come. That said it’s clearly going nowhere for the moment and my guess is that the FZ330 will remain in production for at least another two to three years before the competition finally catches up.

Admittedly I’d liked to have seen DFD autofocus tech replaced or updated with something a little less temperamental, but that’s the only real criticism I could sling in the FZ330’s direction from a purely intermittent perspective. 90% of the time, the camera focuses flawlessly but I’m as sure as I can be that it could be made even more reliable in an upgrade that we may or may not eventually see. Who knows?

No worries either way, because when push comes to shove I’ll simply keep on buying brand new FZ330’s as each unit becomes long in the tooth. I’m already using my second one and will undoubtedly purchase a couple more in preference to anything else currently available as and when required.

In closing, did I tell you just how highly I rate the FZ330? If not, please feel free to read and read again. After all, you now have two parts of this review to study at your leisure. Just in case you missed it, here’s another link to part one:

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/63244070

Thank you very much reading my review (s). If you already own the FZ330, you might appreciate why I’m so enthusiastic about the camera. If not, then I urge you to at least check one out at your favourite retailer.

All the best and happy shooting…

PLEASE NOTE. No image examples included in this review were taken with a TC added. FZ330 only!

Click on image to expand

Click on image to expand

Ps: The full interview with Mr. Yamane that sparked this second section of my FZ330 review can be read here:

https://www.dpreview.com/interviews/8480678649/panasonic-interview-we-will-strengthen-both-full-frame-and-m43?utm_source=self-desktop&utm_medium=marquee&utm_campaign=traffic_source

Cheers…

 Dale108's gear list:Dale108's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ300 Olympus TG-5 Sony RX10 IV Pentax K-1 Panasonic Lumix DC-G9
OP Stevie Boy Blue Senior Member • Posts: 1,519
Re: FZ330 as Swiss Army Knife?
3

Dale108 wrote:

The FZ300 (330) may be the Swiss Army Knife of cameras. It can be used for wildlife, close ups, you name it. As a former owner of the Fz200, what really makes the FZ300 so useful includes:

  1. Larger viewfinder that is a joy to use.
  2. Weather sealing that will allow shooting in the elements
  3. Touch screen

Of course the 25-600mm f2.8 lens has not been duplicated by another company and is the heart of the camera.

If a person had to have one camera on deserted island, this would be it.

Dale

Sorry Dale.

I already labelled the FZ2000 the swiss army knife of cameras in my review conclusion of it some eight months ago. So, as much as I like both you and the FZ330, you’ll have to settle for calling it something else.

How does ‘jack of all trades’ sound? Or, maybe the real swiss army knife’s baby brother? Or anything else you might settle for?

Got to have a laugh now and again, eh?  

Seriously though, thanks for the extra input. I’m sure anyone checking out the FZ300 as a prospective purchase will appreciate reading more than just my views of it.

Thanks for popping in again. Very good of you.

Cheers…

Stevie Boy Blue wrote:

Please note that this is an addition to the original and extensive review of the FZ330 that I compiled back in October 2019. See here:

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/63244070

Primarily this extension is born of a response to a question posed by DPR’s Barney Britton to Yosuke Yamane, director of Panasonic’s Imaging Division, in an interview published on March 30th 2021:

Asked whether there is still a market for compact cameras (under which bridge models like the FZ330 fall)? Mr. Yamane indicated that, although the Covid-19 damaged digital camera market was now recovering, interest in compacts is shrinking whilst demand for mirrorless models has grown steadily. With video production and live streaming demands diversified, he predicts the role of mirrorless cameras will continue to expand.

Hence, although he doesn’t state that Panasonic’s range of compacts (and FZ cameras) have no future, Mr. Yamane does admit the company will continue to strengthen full-frame and M4/3rd systems, thereby at least implying what many of us have suspected for a good while now. Yep, I believe it’s now fair and possibly accurate to presume that Panasonic’s development of compact cameras, including FZs – and especially those with pinhead 1/2.3 sensors – has been well and truly shelved for the foreseeable future at least. Perhaps 1-inch sensor models aside, could it even be that the FZ330 is the last camera of its kind that we’ll ever see from the company?

Hmmm, imagine if that were true rather than merely my own fairly justifiable assumption. Where exactly would it leave FZ fans like me and countless others who have bought and enjoyed this range of camera for many years?

Well, although I can’t and wouldn’t attempt to speak for all, as one of this range’s biggest and most longstanding fans, a shelved developmental line actually does not affect or bother me in the slightest – at least beyond postponing the excitement I always felt at the prospect of a brand new release/purchase.

That’s because the FZ330 will always be the FZ330 and nothing less. It remains in production with no sign whatsoever of being phased out any time soon. It just might never be upgraded. But logically, would that be such a bad thing when you can still buy one that rolled off the production line as recently as last month or next, and the one after that if you continue to wait as long as you like?

Despite it being in its 6th (yes sixth) year of production, the FZ330 is no less the absolutely superb camera today than it was when released back in 2015. Its 25mm to 600mm F2.8 aperture lens has still never been surpassed or even equalled by any other manufacturer.

It takes astonishingly good photographs for any camera in its class – of course within the limits of its tiny sensor. It’s splash and dust resistant, shoots 4K video and has a fast burst rate for capturing stills of action sequences. All in all and in my personal opinion, the FZ330 is the best camera of its kind made by any manufacturer, not just Panasonic but all of those so-called bigger brands, too. In the 1/2.3 sensor category, even in 2021 THE FZ330 REMAINS KING OF ALL BRIDGE CAMERAS for the money we pay. Nothing else comes remotely close to it.

And so, to remind some whilst enlightening others to the camera’s sheer versatility, I submit the following image examples for readers’ to view. Please note that although all photos have been resized and/or cropped for uploading through a relatively slow internet connection, they are all Jpegs as they appeared straight out of the camera. Note that I’ve also included my settings, too. (See the relevant illustration for that particular revelation, one which I first published way back in 2015.)

I do not shoot RAW and I rarely post process any image that I do not print. These are OOC Jpegs resized, just like all those examples in my first review.

In the main, those initial shots in the first review were indicators of the camera’s potential as mainly a wildlife tool when we can get close enough to fill as much as the frame as possible with the subject. That is and always will be key to rendering fine fur and feather detail on pinhead sensors that simply do not afford the crop-ability of larger sensors such as M4/3rd or bigger.

This latest set is more to outline what the camera is capable of as a do-it-all, carry everywhere prospect that shows little limitations when kept under ISO 800 and where light levels are at least reasonable to very good. Remember, at the end of the day, this is a bridge camera with a small sensor. In many respects it has the means to surprise or even stun us with the quality of image it can produce, particularly in capable hands and when set up optimally. But if you require professional levels of consistency across the board at all times, maybe you’ll need a model with a much larger sensor for a much larger price.

As I have already said, for the money, the FZ330’s top of all in its class. If you want the very best camera of all, then you’ll be shelling out thousands rather than hundreds and are sure to be changing lenses for all manner of things that the FZ330 can muster minus such inconveniences. As ever, the choice is yours.

But you can rest assured that despite every incarnation of smart phone representing another nail in the coffin of most compact cameras, the FZ300 is simply too versatile a machine to fall victim to the mainstream trends. On the contrary, I’ve had it confirmed by no less than five respected UK retailers in the last few days that the FZ330 remains a very popular seller indeed. I’m in no way surprised by that.

All in all, the FZ330 is as good a camera today as it was when released almost six years ago. That is just how far ahead of its time it was back in 2015. And if it’s the last small sensor FZ flagship model we ever get to appreciate, many of us will be celebrating it as one of Panasonic’s greatest ever achievements for years to come. That said it’s clearly going nowhere for the moment and my guess is that the FZ330 will remain in production for at least another two to three years before the competition finally catches up.

Admittedly I’d liked to have seen DFD autofocus tech replaced or updated with something a little less temperamental, but that’s the only real criticism I could sling in the FZ330’s direction from a purely intermittent perspective. 90% of the time, the camera focuses flawlessly but I’m as sure as I can be that it could be made even more reliable in an upgrade that we may or may not eventually see. Who knows?

No worries either way, because when push comes to shove I’ll simply keep on buying brand new FZ330’s as each unit becomes long in the tooth. I’m already using my second one and will undoubtedly purchase a couple more in preference to anything else currently available as and when required.

In closing, did I tell you just how highly I rate the FZ330? If not, please feel free to read and read again. After all, you now have two parts of this review to study at your leisure. Just in case you missed it, here’s another link to part one:

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/63244070

Thank you very much reading my review (s). If you already own the FZ330, you might appreciate why I’m so enthusiastic about the camera. If not, then I urge you to at least check one out at your favourite retailer.

All the best and happy shooting…

PLEASE NOTE. No image examples included in this review were taken with a TC added. FZ330 only!

Click on image to expand

Click on image to expand

Ps: The full interview with Mr. Yamane that sparked this second section of my FZ330 review can be read here:

https://www.dpreview.com/interviews/8480678649/panasonic-interview-we-will-strengthen-both-full-frame-and-m43?utm_source=self-desktop&utm_medium=marquee&utm_campaign=traffic_source

Cheers…

Mikedigi
Mikedigi Forum Pro • Posts: 11,150
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
1

Stevie Boy Blue wrote:

PJPfeiffer wrote:

Excellent write up!

The members of my photo club owning full frame DSLRs are amazed by the capabilities and results obtained with my FZ300.

Most of these images came from my FZ300 https://flickr.com/photos/pjpfeiffer/

The most recent moon images excluded (iPhone 11 Pro attached to my telescope)

Thank you PJP.

[Snip]

. . . . . When asked why I choose FZs over digital ILCs for wildlife? I always give the honest reply that for the money and what I require of them, these bridge cameras are more than good enough when we know how to use them to their strengths and can fill as much of the frame as possible with the subject. Not everyone can close enough to do this, including some of those so-called pros who rely so much on cropping images down from bigger sensors. Nothing wrong with either method. I just enjoy the extra challenge involved with getting as close as I physically can. . . . . . .

Yes, it's fun to have a camera that is kind of subversive. Back then my FZ8 was ultra-subversive, looked like a toy and worked like a rattlesnake, getting crisp head shots of colourful folks in a Folk Festival procession, etc.

I got the same buzz at an Air Day with little old biplanes and home-built planes, using my FZ200 alongside guys with Canons and Nikons with lenses about 18" long.

I wandered off into DSLRs several times but always came back to subversives, now my FZ330 and Stylus 1s. And my new old FZ8!  

Mike

 Mikedigi's gear list:Mikedigi's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ8 Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS7 Olympus Stylus 1s Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ300
OP Stevie Boy Blue Senior Member • Posts: 1,519
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
1

Mikedigi wrote:

Stevie Boy Blue wrote:

PJPfeiffer wrote:

Excellent write up!

The members of my photo club owning full frame DSLRs are amazed by the capabilities and results obtained with my FZ300.

Most of these images came from my FZ300 https://flickr.com/photos/pjpfeiffer/

The most recent moon images excluded (iPhone 11 Pro attached to my telescope)

Thank you PJP.

[Snip]

. . . . . When asked why I choose FZs over digital ILCs for wildlife? I always give the honest reply that for the money and what I require of them, these bridge cameras are more than good enough when we know how to use them to their strengths and can fill as much of the frame as possible with the subject. Not everyone can close enough to do this, including some of those so-called pros who rely so much on cropping images down from bigger sensors. Nothing wrong with either method. I just enjoy the extra challenge involved with getting as close as I physically can. . . . . . .

Yes, it's fun to have a camera that is kind of subversive. Back then my FZ8 was ultra-subversive, looked like a toy and worked like a rattlesnake, getting crisp head shots of colourful folks in a Folk Festival procession, etc.

I got the same buzz at an Air Day with little old biplanes and home-built planes, using my FZ200 alongside guys with Canons and Nikons with lenses about 18" long.

I wandered off into DSLRs several times but always came back to subversives, now my FZ330 and Stylus 1s. And my new old FZ8!

Mike

Indeed Mike,

I'm a firm believer that any reasonably good photographer can pull the best from any camera he or she uses.

To some, FZ330s and the like may look like toys, but they're every bit as capable as the person using them and can compete with far more expensive and pro-like gear in the right hands and when set up to function optimally under appropriate conditions and light levels.

Happy shooting to ya.

Cheers...

Mikedigi
Mikedigi Forum Pro • Posts: 11,150
Toys
1

Yes, pic of my 2 main toys herewith. The Stylus1s is 28-300 with f2.8 constant aperture like the FZ330. But the body is Box 1970s OM1 and the grip is a joke.

Mike

-- hide signature --

The older I get, the better I was.

 Mikedigi's gear list:Mikedigi's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ8 Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS7 Olympus Stylus 1s Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ300
Al Ball Junior Member • Posts: 25
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
1

Thanks for replying Stevie.

I can see how choosing this camera over my others could always be tempting.

Good tip to start with sharpening at 0 when NR is at -5.

Should help make small sensor noise less obvious under magnified viewing.

Will see how things go on my next trip out and keep you posted.

 Al Ball's gear list:Al Ball's gear list
Canon PowerShot SX70 Panasonic Lumix DC-G9
Al Ball Junior Member • Posts: 25
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
1

Kingate Cavies wrote:

Hi Al, can I just ask, have you had any problem with movement of the LCD touchscreen when turned around to face outwards? Mine seems to not snap in place and seems to wobble, just don't know if the is normal or not? Considering sending it back!! Sue

I second what Stevie Boy said about the movement of screens on his cameras.

In your video on the other thread nothing odd is happening.

Both flip out screens on my fz300 and G9 have the same range of play as yours.

Canon flip outs have similar play in them. Must all be by design.

 Al Ball's gear list:Al Ball's gear list
Canon PowerShot SX70 Panasonic Lumix DC-G9
John McCormack
John McCormack Veteran Member • Posts: 6,637
Prodigal Son Returns. Re: FZ330 as Swiss Army Knife?
2

I've been shooting Olympus M4/3 for the past year, but recently dusted off my FZ300 using most of the settings in this and Part 1 of the review. I'm still amazed at the quality from the FZs - my first was the FZ18. As mentioned the FZ300 is truly versatile with tons of - sometime overwhelming - options.

-- hide signature --

"A photograph is the pause button of life." Bjorn Moerman.

Dale108
Dale108 Veteran Member • Posts: 9,137
Re: Prodigal Son Returns. Re: FZ330 as Swiss Army Knife?
2

Nice examples John.

Dale

John McCormack wrote:

I've been shooting Olympus M4/3 for the past year, but recently dusted off my FZ300 using most of the settings in this and Part 1 of the review. I'm still amazed at the quality from the FZs - my first was the FZ18. As mentioned the FZ300 is truly versatile with tons of - sometime overwhelming - options.

 Dale108's gear list:Dale108's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ300 Olympus TG-5 Sony RX10 IV Pentax K-1 Panasonic Lumix DC-G9
Vlad53 Regular Member • Posts: 121
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
1

I post not too much pictures. I think that just really good or interesting images are deserved to be presented to public. I'm still in deciding stage, but will provide feedback when it possible.

Thank you,

Vladimir

 Vlad53's gear list:Vlad53's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 Sony a6000
OP Stevie Boy Blue Senior Member • Posts: 1,519
Re: Toys
1

Mikedigi wrote:

Yes, pic of my 2 main toys herewith. The Stylus1s is 28-300 with f2.8 constant aperture like the FZ330. But the body is Box 1970s OM1 and the grip is a joke.

Mike

Nice toys, Mike.

If I were to photograph my current collection of toys, I'd need an extra wide lens to fit 'em all in the frame.

Thanks for sharing.

Cheers...

OP Stevie Boy Blue Senior Member • Posts: 1,519
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
1

Al Ball wrote:

Thanks for replying Stevie.

I can see how choosing this camera over my others could always be tempting.

Good tip to start with sharpening at 0 when NR is at -5.

Should help make small sensor noise less obvious under magnified viewing.

Will see how things go on my next trip out and keep you posted.

You're welcome, Al

Thanks to you, too. I'll keep an eye open for your future updates.

Cheers and all the best...

OP Stevie Boy Blue Senior Member • Posts: 1,519
*Prodigal Son and Cats Return?*
3

Thanks for the input, John.

Sorry you’ve posted the cat images though; I’m so allergic that I sneeze and wheeze just looking at ‘em.

On a more serious note: It’s good to see you’re trying out the Jpeg setting suggestions and apparently enjoying your return to the FZ330. You are of course right that there are a ton of options that apply to the camera which, if we allow them, can sometimes appear overwhelming. In all likelihood though, I will never use a least half of what’s actually available from the full specifications.

I much prefer (and would advise others) to keep things relatively simple by consistently sticking to my long tried and tested method of shooting in aperture priority. I mainly stick to the F4 lens sweet spot, which I prioritise over any other aperture for all focal lengths throughout the range from 25 to 600mm.

Occasionally I’ll select F3.2 because in my experience it’s sharper than the wide open F2.8 at full zoom. Rarely do I close things down lower than F4.5, and of course I vary ISO and exposure compensation appropriately to each and every fluctuation in light levels and/or highlight preservation within any scene or in relation to specific individual wildlife subjects. I hate to see blown out detail in white or light coloured feathers, for example. So generally I leave EV at – 1/3rd of a stop by default and adjust accordingly from there.

To some, this may initially appear complicated but nothing could be simpler once the method is practiced to the point it becomes second nature, which should take no more than a month or two’s worth of sessions at most. Practice, practice, practice is always the key to consistency and at the end of the day the FZ330 is only as complicated or overwhelming as users choose to make it.

Please don’t take this as any kind of lecture. The post is for the benefit of anyone who likes their method of photography to be as simple as possible whilst also affording a wide spectrum of creativity. Re the FZ330, that is what Aperture Priority affords anyone who chooses it over any other PASM setting or that fully automatic IA mode.

Thanks again for posting.

Cheers and all the best…

OP Stevie Boy Blue Senior Member • Posts: 1,519
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
1

Vlad53 wrote:

I post not too much pictures. I think that just really good or interesting images are deserved to be presented to public. I'm still in deciding stage, but will provide feedback when it possible.

Thank you,

Vladimir

Thanks, Vladimir.

Take all the time you need and post as much as you like when you like. No rush.

Cheers...

GeraldW Veteran Member • Posts: 8,805
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
1

My new toy has arrived, and it looks to be a very nice one.  For starters, I set it up using the same parameters as you posted.

The FZ200 settings are just like the FZ150, -2, 0, +2, and I used NR -2, Sh +1 for that camera.  At least for the three later ones.  The first two showed excess noise with that setting.  In retrospect, I find it hard to believe I actually had 5 of those.  I still have one that was made in Japan and works well with the NR -2, Sh +1 settings.

You're quite right, the FZ200 settings don't translate precisely to the FZ300; but it does give a good starting point for further fine tuning.  Since this is my second FZ300, it was quite easy to get the camera fine tuned.

I was surprised, however, that it didn't come with an external charger; but instead, a wall wart with fixed prongs, a USB cable, and a cradle for the battery.  It works, and can also charge in the camera; but it's just a lot of extra stuff to store away, and it's slower than the original A79 charger; the US version of which has folding prongs.

-- hide signature --

Jerry

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Canon PowerShot S95 Canon PowerShot G15 Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ300 Canon G7 X II Canon EOS M5 +1 more
OP Stevie Boy Blue Senior Member • Posts: 1,519
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
2

GeraldW wrote:

My new toy has arrived, and it looks to be a very nice one. For starters, I set it up using the same parameters as you posted.

The FZ200 settings are just like the FZ150, -2, 0, +2, and I used NR -2, Sh +1 for that camera. At least for the three later ones. The first two showed excess noise with that setting. In retrospect, I find it hard to believe I actually had 5 of those. I still have one that was made in Japan and works well with the NR -2, Sh +1 settings.

You're quite right, the FZ200 settings don't translate precisely to the FZ300; but it does give a good starting point for further fine tuning. Since this is my second FZ300, it was quite easy to get the camera fine tuned.

I was surprised, however, that it didn't come with an external charger; but instead, a wall wart with fixed prongs, a USB cable, and a cradle for the battery. It works, and can also charge in the camera; but it's just a lot of extra stuff to store away, and it's slower than the original A79 charger; the US version of which has folding prongs.

Yay! Well done, Jerry.

Good to see the new camera’s arrived and that you’re up and running with it already.

The change in chargers must be a new thing and/or maybe now just applies to certain countries, perhaps even only those where the camera’s labelled FZ300 rather than 330? Who knows?

My most recently purchased FZ330 was manufactured and sold to me in 2019, and it was shipped with the usual charger we see over here in the UK. As it’s the same as that supplied with the FZ200, I’ve never taken my FZ330 charger out of its wrapper, same goes for the first one I bought in 2015. Hence I’m more than Okay for backups.

Re your new set-up though, it could now apply everywhere and be Panasonic’s way of updating things for future sales. Perhaps they’re now offering in-body battery charging through consumer demand and maybe even the means to charge from a USB port in a car or other vehicle? Is that an option now, too, I wonder?

If so, it would make sense and also add weight to my suspicion that the FZ330 (300) is to remain in production for a few more years yet.

Either way, something’s changed, for whatever the reason. And if it all means we’ve more options re where and when we can charge the camera, that’s surely no bad thing overall.

Good luck with your new toy.

Cheers…

OP Stevie Boy Blue Senior Member • Posts: 1,519
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
1

Al Ball wrote:

Kingate Cavies wrote:

Hi Al, can I just ask, have you had any problem with movement of the LCD touchscreen when turned around to face outwards? Mine seems to not snap in place and seems to wobble, just don't know if the is normal or not? Considering sending it back!! Sue

I second what Stevie Boy said about the movement of screens on his cameras.

In your video on the other thread nothing odd is happening.

Both flip out screens on my fz300 and G9 have the same range of play as yours.

Canon flip outs have similar play in them. Must all be by design.

Thanks for 'the seconding', Al.

Yes, I recall viewing a few G series cameras a while back, all of which had the same amount of play in the articulating screens as the FZ330 does. Nothing unusual. All completely normal for the design; even for Canon models, too, it seems.

Cheers...

Yan Dale New Member • Posts: 2
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
1

Both parts 1 and 2 of your FZ300 user review are great as is your FZ2500 review. Excellent photo examples in all. You obviously rate both cameras very highly. I kind of feel bad for asking this. But if you could own just one and were forced to choose between the FZ300 and FZ2500 which would you pick? I think I can guess the answer. But it would be good to have it confirmed here or by PM whichever is easiest for you. No rush. Thanks very much.

OP Stevie Boy Blue Senior Member • Posts: 1,519
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
1

Yan Dale wrote:

Both parts 1 and 2 of your FZ300 user review are great as is your FZ2500 review. Excellent photo examples in all. You obviously rate both cameras very highly. I kind of feel bad for asking this. But if you could own just one and were forced to choose between the FZ300 and FZ2500 which would you pick? I think I can guess the answer. But it would be good to have it confirmed here or by PM whichever is easiest for you. No rush. Thanks very much.

Thank you very much, Yan. Glad you like the reviews.

I’m pleased you’re in no rush for a reply to your question though, as I’ll have to come back to you on that one in the next few days.

Cheers for now…

Todd Beall Regular Member • Posts: 189
Re: *Prodigal Son and Cats Return?*
1

Stevie, I just now discovered your excellent 2-part review of the FZ300 camera. I have owned this camera for 5 years, and am now giving away my much bulkier Canon 70D (plus lenses) to a young camera enthusiast, as I've finally decided that the 300 is plenty enough camera for me (I am 69 and have nerve damage to my hands, so weight is also quite important--as is grip, and the 300 has an incredible grip!).

I especially appreciate the standard settings suggestions as well as the use of aperture priority (f4 primarily). I am going to test that out and see how it works.

Thank you so much for taking the time to write these two articles!

Sincerely,

Todd Beall

P.S. Have you read Graham Houghton's User Guide to the FZ300? I think it is excellent (though sometimes a bit too detailed for me)

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