**FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**

Started 5 months ago | User reviews
Stevie Boy Blue Senior Member • Posts: 1,519
**FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
21

Please note that this is an addition to the original and extensive review of the FZ330 that I compiled back in October 2019. See here:

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/63244070

Primarily this extension is born of a response to a question posed by DPR’s Barney Britton to Yosuke Yamane, director of Panasonic’s Imaging Division, in an interview published on March 30th 2021:

Asked whether there is still a market for compact cameras (under which bridge models like the FZ330 fall)? Mr. Yamane indicated that, although the Covid-19 damaged digital camera market was now recovering, interest in compacts is shrinking whilst demand for mirrorless models has grown steadily. With video production and live streaming demands diversified, he predicts the role of mirrorless cameras will continue to expand.

Hence, although he doesn’t state that Panasonic’s range of compacts (and FZ cameras) have no future, Mr. Yamane does admit the company will continue to strengthen full-frame and M4/3rd systems, thereby at least implying what many of us have suspected for a good while now. Yep, I believe it’s now fair and possibly accurate to presume that Panasonic’s development of compact cameras, including FZs – and especially those with pinhead 1/2.3 sensors – has been well and truly shelved for the foreseeable future at least. Perhaps 1-inch sensor models aside, could it even be that the FZ330 is the last camera of its kind that we’ll ever see from the company?

Hmmm, imagine if that were true rather than merely my own fairly justifiable assumption. Where exactly would it leave FZ fans like me and countless others who have bought and enjoyed this range of camera for many years?

Well, although I can’t and wouldn’t attempt to speak for all, as one of this range’s biggest and most longstanding fans, a shelved developmental line actually does not affect or bother me in the slightest – at least beyond postponing the excitement I always felt at the prospect of a brand new release/purchase.

That’s because the FZ330 will always be the FZ330 and nothing less. It remains in production with no sign whatsoever of being phased out any time soon. It just might never be upgraded. But logically, would that be such a bad thing when you can still buy one that rolled off the production line as recently as last month or next, and the one after that if you continue to wait as long as you like?

Despite it being in its 6th (yes sixth) year of production, the FZ330 is no less the absolutely superb camera today than it was when released back in 2015. Its 25mm to 600mm F2.8 aperture lens has still never been surpassed or even equalled by any other manufacturer.

It takes astonishingly good photographs for any camera in its class – of course within the limits of its tiny sensor. It’s splash and dust resistant, shoots 4K video and has a fast burst rate for capturing stills of action sequences. All in all and in my personal opinion, the FZ330 is the best camera of its kind made by any manufacturer, not just Panasonic but all of those so-called bigger brands, too. In the 1/2.3 sensor category, even in 2021 THE FZ330 REMAINS KING OF ALL BRIDGE CAMERAS for the money we pay. Nothing else comes remotely close to it.

And so, to remind some whilst enlightening others to the camera’s sheer versatility, I submit the following image examples for readers’ to view. Please note that although all photos have been resized and/or cropped for uploading through a relatively slow internet connection, they are all Jpegs as they appeared straight out of the camera. Note that I’ve also included my settings, too. (See the relevant illustration for that particular revelation, one which I first published way back in 2015.)

I do not shoot RAW and I rarely post process any image that I do not print. These are OOC Jpegs resized, just like all those examples in my first review.

In the main, those initial shots in the first review were indicators of the camera’s potential as mainly a wildlife tool when we can get close enough to fill as much as the frame as possible with the subject. That is and always will be key to rendering fine fur and feather detail on pinhead sensors that simply do not afford the crop-ability of larger sensors such as M4/3rd or bigger.

This latest set is more to outline what the camera is capable of as a do-it-all, carry everywhere prospect that shows little limitations when kept under ISO 800 and where light levels are at least reasonable to very good. Remember, at the end of the day, this is a bridge camera with a small sensor. In many respects it has the means to surprise or even stun us with the quality of image it can produce, particularly in capable hands and when set up optimally. But if you require professional levels of consistency across the board at all times, maybe you’ll need a model with a much larger sensor for a much larger price.

As I have already said, for the money, the FZ330’s top of all in its class. If you want the very best camera of all, then you’ll be shelling out thousands rather than hundreds and are sure to be changing lenses for all manner of things that the FZ330 can muster minus such inconveniences. As ever, the choice is yours.

But you can rest assured that despite every incarnation of smart phone representing another nail in the coffin of most compact cameras, the FZ300 is simply too versatile a machine to fall victim to the mainstream trends. On the contrary, I’ve had it confirmed by no less than five respected UK retailers in the last few days that the FZ330 remains a very popular seller indeed. I’m in no way surprised by that.

All in all, the FZ330 is as good a camera today as it was when released almost six years ago. That is just how far ahead of its time it was back in 2015. And if it’s the last small sensor FZ flagship model we ever get to appreciate, many of us will be celebrating it as one of Panasonic’s greatest ever achievements for years to come. That said it’s clearly going nowhere for the moment and my guess is that the FZ330 will remain in production for at least another two to three years before the competition finally catches up.

Admittedly I’d liked to have seen DFD autofocus tech replaced or updated with something a little less temperamental, but that’s the only real criticism I could sling in the FZ330’s direction from a purely intermittent perspective. 90% of the time, the camera focuses flawlessly but I’m as sure as I can be that it could be made even more reliable in an upgrade that we may or may not eventually see. Who knows?

No worries either way, because when push comes to shove I’ll simply keep on buying brand new FZ330’s as each unit becomes long in the tooth. I’m already using my second one and will undoubtedly purchase a couple more in preference to anything else currently available as and when required.

In closing, did I tell you just how highly I rate the FZ330? If not, please feel free to read and read again. After all, you now have two parts of this review to study at your leisure. Just in case you missed it, here’s another link to part one:

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/63244070

Thank you very much reading my review (s). If you already own the FZ330, you might appreciate why I’m so enthusiastic about the camera. If not, then I urge you to at least check one out at your favourite retailer.

All the best and happy shooting…

PLEASE NOTE. No image examples included in this review were taken with a TC added. FZ330 only!

Click on image to expand

Click on image to expand

Ps: The full interview with Mr. Yamane that sparked this second section of my FZ330 review can be read here:

https://www.dpreview.com/interviews/8480678649/panasonic-interview-we-will-strengthen-both-full-frame-and-m43?utm_source=self-desktop&utm_medium=marquee&utm_campaign=traffic_source

Cheers…

Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ300
12 megapixels • 3 screen • 25 – 600 mm (24×)
Announced: Jul 16, 2015
Stevie Boy Blue's score
5.0
Average community score
5.0
bad for good for
Kids / pets
great
Action / sports
great
Landscapes / scenery
great
Portraits
great
Low light (without flash)
good
Flash photography (social)
unrated
Studio / still life
unrated
= community average
Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ300
If you believe there are incorrect tags, please send us this post using our feedback form.
Sue Anne Rush
Sue Anne Rush Senior Member • Posts: 2,786
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
2

Excellent review and I am happy with my Panasonic Z1000 ii. 

Stevie Boy Blue wrote:

Please note that this is an addition to the original and extensive review of the FZ330 that I compiled back in October 2019. See here:

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/63244070

Primarily this extension is born of a response to a question posed by DPR’s Barney Britton to Yosuke Yamane, director of Panasonic’s Imaging Division, in an interview published on March 30th 2021:

Asked whether there is still a market for compact cameras (under which bridge models like the FZ330 fall)? Mr. Yamane indicated that, although the Covid-19 damaged digital camera market was now recovering, interest in compacts is shrinking whilst demand for mirrorless models has grown steadily. With video production and live streaming demands diversified, he predicts the role of mirrorless cameras will continue to expand.

Hence, although he doesn’t state that Panasonic’s range of compacts (and FZ cameras) have no future, Mr. Yamane does admit the company will continue to strengthen full-frame and M4/3rd systems, thereby at least implying what many of us have suspected for a good while now. Yep, I believe it’s now fair and possibly accurate to presume that Panasonic’s development of compact cameras, including FZs – and especially those with pinhead 1/2.3 sensors – has been well and truly shelved for the foreseeable future at least. Perhaps 1-inch sensor models aside, could it even be that the FZ330 is the last camera of its kind that we’ll ever see from the company?

Hmmm, imagine if that were true rather than merely my own fairly justifiable assumption. Where exactly would it leave FZ fans like me and countless others who have bought and enjoyed this range of camera for many years?

Well, although I can’t and wouldn’t attempt to speak for all, as one of this range’s biggest and most longstanding fans, a shelved developmental line actually does not affect or bother me in the slightest – at least beyond postponing the excitement I always felt at the prospect of a brand new release/purchase.

That’s because the FZ330 will always be the FZ330 and nothing less. It remains in production with no sign whatsoever of being phased out any time soon. It just might never be upgraded. But logically, would that be such a bad thing when you can still buy one that rolled off the production line as recently as last month or next, and the one after that if you continue to wait as long as you like?

Despite it being in its 6th (yes sixth) year of production, the FZ330 is no less the absolutely superb camera today than it was when released back in 2015. Its 25mm to 600mm F2.8 aperture lens has still never been surpassed or even equalled by any other manufacturer.

It takes astonishingly good photographs for any camera in its class – of course within the limits of its tiny sensor. It’s splash and dust resistant, shoots 4K video and has a fast burst rate for capturing stills of action sequences. All in all and in my personal opinion, the FZ330 is the best camera of its kind made by any manufacturer, not just Panasonic but all of those so-called bigger brands, too. In the 1/2.3 sensor category, even in 2021 THE FZ330 REMAINS KING OF ALL BRIDGE CAMERAS for the money we pay. Nothing else comes remotely close to it.

And so, to remind some whilst enlightening others to the camera’s sheer versatility, I submit the following image examples for readers’ to view. Please note that although all photos have been resized and/or cropped for uploading through a relatively slow internet connection, they are all Jpegs as they appeared straight out of the camera. Note that I’ve also included my settings, too. (See the relevant illustration for that particular revelation, one which I first published way back in 2015.)

I do not shoot RAW and I rarely post process any image that I do not print. These are OOC Jpegs resized, just like all those examples in my first review.

In the main, those initial shots in the first review were indicators of the camera’s potential as mainly a wildlife tool when we can get close enough to fill as much as the frame as possible with the subject. That is and always will be key to rendering fine fur and feather detail on pinhead sensors that simply do not afford the crop-ability of larger sensors such as M4/3rd or bigger.

This latest set is more to outline what the camera is capable of as a do-it-all, carry everywhere prospect that shows little limitations when kept under ISO 800 and where light levels are at least reasonable to very good. Remember, at the end of the day, this is a bridge camera with a small sensor. In many respects it has the means to surprise or even stun us with the quality of image it can produce, particularly in capable hands and when set up optimally. But if you require professional levels of consistency across the board at all times, maybe you’ll need a model with a much larger sensor for a much larger price.

As I have already said, for the money, the FZ330’s top of all in its class. If you want the very best camera of all, then you’ll be shelling out thousands rather than hundreds and are sure to be changing lenses for all manner of things that the FZ330 can muster minus such inconveniences. As ever, the choice is yours.

But you can rest assured that despite every incarnation of smart phone representing another nail in the coffin of most compact cameras, the FZ300 is simply too versatile a machine to fall victim to the mainstream trends. On the contrary, I’ve had it confirmed by no less than five respected UK retailers in the last few days that the FZ330 remains a very popular seller indeed. I’m in no way surprised by that.

All in all, the FZ330 is as good a camera today as it was when released almost six years ago. That is just how far ahead of its time it was back in 2015. And if it’s the last small sensor FZ flagship model we ever get to appreciate, many of us will be celebrating it as one of Panasonic’s greatest ever achievements for years to come. That said it’s clearly going nowhere for the moment and my guess is that the FZ330 will remain in production for at least another two to three years before the competition finally catches up.

Admittedly I’d liked to have seen DFD autofocus tech replaced or updated with something a little less temperamental, but that’s the only real criticism I could sling in the FZ330’s direction from a purely intermittent perspective. 90% of the time, the camera focuses flawlessly but I’m as sure as I can be that it could be made even more reliable in an upgrade that we may or may not eventually see. Who knows?

No worries either way, because when push comes to shove I’ll simply keep on buying brand new FZ330’s as each unit becomes long in the tooth. I’m already using my second one and will undoubtedly purchase a couple more in preference to anything else currently available as and when required.

In closing, did I tell you just how highly I rate the FZ330? If not, please feel free to read and read again. After all, you now have two parts of this review to study at your leisure. Just in case you missed it, here’s another link to part one:

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/63244070

Thank you very much reading my review (s). If you already own the FZ330, you might appreciate why I’m so enthusiastic about the camera. If not, then I urge you to at least check one out at your favourite retailer.

All the best and happy shooting…

PLEASE NOTE. No image examples included in this review were taken with a TC added. FZ330 only!

Click on image to expand

Click on image to expand

Ps: The full interview with Mr. Yamane that sparked this second section of my FZ330 review can be read here:

https://www.dpreview.com/interviews/8480678649/panasonic-interview-we-will-strengthen-both-full-frame-and-m43?utm_source=self-desktop&utm_medium=marquee&utm_campaign=traffic_source

Cheers…

-- hide signature --

Sue Anne Rush

 Sue Anne Rush's gear list:Sue Anne Rush's gear list
Canon EOS 7D
Vlad53 Regular Member • Posts: 121
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
1

Excellent Stevie! This is one more and much detailed answer to my FZ150 vs. FZ300. Thank you again!

Vladimir

 Vlad53's gear list:Vlad53's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 Sony a6000
Dale108
Dale108 Veteran Member • Posts: 9,190
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
1

Another great summary and homage to the FZ300.

Dale

Stevie Boy Blue wrote:

Please note that this is an addition to the original and extensive review of the FZ330 that I compiled back in October 2019. See here:

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/63244070

Primarily this extension is born of a response to a question posed by DPR’s Barney Britton to Yosuke Yamane, director of Panasonic’s Imaging Division, in an interview published on March 30th 2021:

Asked whether there is still a market for compact cameras (under which bridge models like the FZ330 fall)? Mr. Yamane indicated that, although the Covid-19 damaged digital camera market was now recovering, interest in compacts is shrinking whilst demand for mirrorless models has grown steadily. With video production and live streaming demands diversified, he predicts the role of mirrorless cameras will continue to expand.

Hence, although he doesn’t state that Panasonic’s range of compacts (and FZ cameras) have no future, Mr. Yamane does admit the company will continue to strengthen full-frame and M4/3rd systems, thereby at least implying what many of us have suspected for a good while now. Yep, I believe it’s now fair and possibly accurate to presume that Panasonic’s development of compact cameras, including FZs – and especially those with pinhead 1/2.3 sensors – has been well and truly shelved for the foreseeable future at least. Perhaps 1-inch sensor models aside, could it even be that the FZ330 is the last camera of its kind that we’ll ever see from the company?

Hmmm, imagine if that were true rather than merely my own fairly justifiable assumption. Where exactly would it leave FZ fans like me and countless others who have bought and enjoyed this range of camera for many years?

Well, although I can’t and wouldn’t attempt to speak for all, as one of this range’s biggest and most longstanding fans, a shelved developmental line actually does not affect or bother me in the slightest – at least beyond postponing the excitement I always felt at the prospect of a brand new release/purchase.

That’s because the FZ330 will always be the FZ330 and nothing less. It remains in production with no sign whatsoever of being phased out any time soon. It just might never be upgraded. But logically, would that be such a bad thing when you can still buy one that rolled off the production line as recently as last month or next, and the one after that if you continue to wait as long as you like?

Despite it being in its 6th (yes sixth) year of production, the FZ330 is no less the absolutely superb camera today than it was when released back in 2015. Its 25mm to 600mm F2.8 aperture lens has still never been surpassed or even equalled by any other manufacturer.

It takes astonishingly good photographs for any camera in its class – of course within the limits of its tiny sensor. It’s splash and dust resistant, shoots 4K video and has a fast burst rate for capturing stills of action sequences. All in all and in my personal opinion, the FZ330 is the best camera of its kind made by any manufacturer, not just Panasonic but all of those so-called bigger brands, too. In the 1/2.3 sensor category, even in 2021 THE FZ330 REMAINS KING OF ALL BRIDGE CAMERAS for the money we pay. Nothing else comes remotely close to it.

And so, to remind some whilst enlightening others to the camera’s sheer versatility, I submit the following image examples for readers’ to view. Please note that although all photos have been resized and/or cropped for uploading through a relatively slow internet connection, they are all Jpegs as they appeared straight out of the camera. Note that I’ve also included my settings, too. (See the relevant illustration for that particular revelation, one which I first published way back in 2015.)

I do not shoot RAW and I rarely post process any image that I do not print. These are OOC Jpegs resized, just like all those examples in my first review.

In the main, those initial shots in the first review were indicators of the camera’s potential as mainly a wildlife tool when we can get close enough to fill as much as the frame as possible with the subject. That is and always will be key to rendering fine fur and feather detail on pinhead sensors that simply do not afford the crop-ability of larger sensors such as M4/3rd or bigger.

This latest set is more to outline what the camera is capable of as a do-it-all, carry everywhere prospect that shows little limitations when kept under ISO 800 and where light levels are at least reasonable to very good. Remember, at the end of the day, this is a bridge camera with a small sensor. In many respects it has the means to surprise or even stun us with the quality of image it can produce, particularly in capable hands and when set up optimally. But if you require professional levels of consistency across the board at all times, maybe you’ll need a model with a much larger sensor for a much larger price.

As I have already said, for the money, the FZ330’s top of all in its class. If you want the very best camera of all, then you’ll be shelling out thousands rather than hundreds and are sure to be changing lenses for all manner of things that the FZ330 can muster minus such inconveniences. As ever, the choice is yours.

But you can rest assured that despite every incarnation of smart phone representing another nail in the coffin of most compact cameras, the FZ300 is simply too versatile a machine to fall victim to the mainstream trends. On the contrary, I’ve had it confirmed by no less than five respected UK retailers in the last few days that the FZ330 remains a very popular seller indeed. I’m in no way surprised by that.

All in all, the FZ330 is as good a camera today as it was when released almost six years ago. That is just how far ahead of its time it was back in 2015. And if it’s the last small sensor FZ flagship model we ever get to appreciate, many of us will be celebrating it as one of Panasonic’s greatest ever achievements for years to come. That said it’s clearly going nowhere for the moment and my guess is that the FZ330 will remain in production for at least another two to three years before the competition finally catches up.

Admittedly I’d liked to have seen DFD autofocus tech replaced or updated with something a little less temperamental, but that’s the only real criticism I could sling in the FZ330’s direction from a purely intermittent perspective. 90% of the time, the camera focuses flawlessly but I’m as sure as I can be that it could be made even more reliable in an upgrade that we may or may not eventually see. Who knows?

No worries either way, because when push comes to shove I’ll simply keep on buying brand new FZ330’s as each unit becomes long in the tooth. I’m already using my second one and will undoubtedly purchase a couple more in preference to anything else currently available as and when required.

In closing, did I tell you just how highly I rate the FZ330? If not, please feel free to read and read again. After all, you now have two parts of this review to study at your leisure. Just in case you missed it, here’s another link to part one:

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/63244070

Thank you very much reading my review (s). If you already own the FZ330, you might appreciate why I’m so enthusiastic about the camera. If not, then I urge you to at least check one out at your favourite retailer.

All the best and happy shooting…

PLEASE NOTE. No image examples included in this review were taken with a TC added. FZ330 only!

Click on image to expand

Click on image to expand

Ps: The full interview with Mr. Yamane that sparked this second section of my FZ330 review can be read here:

https://www.dpreview.com/interviews/8480678649/panasonic-interview-we-will-strengthen-both-full-frame-and-m43?utm_source=self-desktop&utm_medium=marquee&utm_campaign=traffic_source

Cheers…

 Dale108's gear list:Dale108's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ300 Olympus TG-5 Sony RX10 IV Pentax K-1 Panasonic Lumix DC-G9
DUBTEMPLE
DUBTEMPLE Contributing Member • Posts: 748
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
2

For sure, likely the best and most overall pinhead ever made

I upped my worn out FZ200 for a FZ100 MkI, (with no regret)

But stilll I consider to get a FZ300 also ,..

So much more since I got the Nikon TC-E17ED and 15ED still around

Got the FZ80 also ,.. but find it terrible

Panasonic is a mixed bag for sure

Sad that this segment of cameras seems deadended

Dont know where to go from here for main-camera ,.. DSLR is Canon now

But video is also an factor from here, starting up with Davinci Resolve 17 Studio

Maybe Nikon Z6, got BlackMagic RAW, etc,..

But the FZ's will always be in the backpack on travels

 DUBTEMPLE's gear list:DUBTEMPLE's gear list
Nikon Coolpix P100 Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 Panasonic FZ1000 Panasonic FZ80/FZ82 Canon EOS 500D +1 more
PJPfeiffer Senior Member • Posts: 1,177
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
1

Excellent write up!

The members of my photo club owning full frame DSLRs are amazed by the capabilities and results obtained with my FZ300.

Most of these images came from my FZ300 https://flickr.com/photos/pjpfeiffer/

The most recent moon images excluded (iPhone 11 Pro attached to my telescope)

 PJPfeiffer's gear list:PJPfeiffer's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ300 Snapseed +3 more
GeraldW Veteran Member • Posts: 8,832
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
2

I'm sure that was a lot of work for you to put together.  So, thank you for that, and for review #1.  Very nice shots, and great Depth of Field, one of the benefits of the small sensor.  Rather than isolating the subject from the background, I find a lot of in-focus depth "invites you into the scene".  And with the small sensor and fast lens, you can get that kind of DoF at large apertures and low ISO settings.

Your recommended settings for the FZ330 are very close, if not identical, to what I used for my "good" FZ200's and for the first FZ300 I had.  My second FZ300 has been ordered and should arrive mid-week.

Since I came into a little extra money recently, I was considering going back to an interchangeable lens camera, and building up a system.  But my 1" sensor fixed lens cameras are more than good enough; and what I really needed was a ruggedized and weather sealed camera - enter the FZ300.

-- hide signature --

Jerry

 GeraldW's gear list:GeraldW's gear list
Canon PowerShot S95 Canon PowerShot G15 Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ300 Canon G7 X II Canon EOS M5 +1 more
Labe Forum Pro • Posts: 12,487
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
2

DUBTEMPLE wrote:

For sure, likely the best and most overall pinhead ever made

I upped my worn out FZ200 for a FZ100 MkI, (with no regret)

But stilll I consider to get a FZ300 also ,..

So much more since I got the Nikon TC-E17ED and 15ED still around

Got the FZ80 also ,.. but find it terrible

Panasonic is a mixed bag for sure

Sad that this segment of cameras seems deadended

Dont know where to go from here for main-camera ,.. DSLR is Canon now

But video is also an factor from here, starting up with Davinci Resolve 17 Studio

Maybe Nikon Z6, got BlackMagic RAW, etc,..

But the FZ's will always be in the backpack on travels

Take a look at Nikon P 950 it’s the next best after the fz330 in pinhead kit or if you can handle an absolute beast the P1000

-- hide signature --

Back to bridge cameras......

 Labe's gear list:Labe's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DC-FZ1000 II Panasonic Lumix DC-S5 Fujifilm FinePix IS-1 Fujifilm X-S1 Fujifilm FinePix HS30EXR +8 more
Al Ball Junior Member • Posts: 25
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
4

Stevie

You have a way with words and a knack with your fz300 that must inspire more people than me.

After reading what you write all I want to do is go outside and shoot photographs.

Your natural talent is a blessing and we are lucky to have you on these forums.

I did not see part 2 of your review coming but enjoyed reading it as much as the first one.

Thank you for taking the time to prepare and post it.

The photos you included look great as always and showcase what the camera does across its range.

You know that I recently bought a fz300 and I will update you on my progress here.

Since buying it I have not used my G9 kit as much as I was doing.

Not saying fz300 full res IQ is a match for the G9 but it is better than I expected for sensor size.

12mp is about right for the fz by the look of things.

Been messing around with j-peg settings and will try the ones you used with AWB changes.

Have not picked up my canon sx70 since buying the fz because I am getting close enough to subjects without it for now.

It is still early days because I have only had the fz300 for just over a week. But I am very impressed by it so far.

Cannot believe how well it handles and how solid it feels for a bridge camera at its price point.

Would be a shame if Panasonic dropped the fz line. But as you say the fz300 is still a popular seller.

Will let you know how I progress over the next few weeks.

I posted today mostly to say that I am really grateful for your experience and writings and for this review part 2.

 Al Ball's gear list:Al Ball's gear list
Canon PowerShot SX70 Panasonic Lumix DC-G9
Mikedigi
Mikedigi Forum Pro • Posts: 11,150
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
1

Yes Steve, I agree with the whole of your FZ330 Review Part 2.

It would just be nice if the FZ330 had ND filters built in, but one cannot have everything and for around £350 these days, it is incomparable value for money.

I share your enthusiasm for the FZ330 TeleMacro fun, shooting small objects from 39"/1 metre distance at max 600mm optical zoom, but I would add that I sometimes use this Telemacro at any focal length from 300 to max 600mm focal length, whereas my lovely FZ8 could "only" do Telemacro at its max focal length 432mm.

And, essential for me, the FZ330 is a great SOOC JPEG shooter, much improved over previous FZs.

I use Aperture Priority mode, on f4 when possible, Vivid Photo Style, Contrast 0, Sharpness 0, NR -5, Saturation +1, AWB 2 clicks to Amber, no i-settings.

And my FZ330 only cost me £300 from Panasonic Outlet about 4 years ago, a refurb but as good as new with full warranty.

I only need 2 other cameras - my Olympus Stylus 1s, which is also brilliant and does a lot of what the FZ330 will do, but is about half the size and weight; and my old TZ10/ZS7, which is my only belt camera and is good enough for the job.

Having enjoyed an FZ8 from 2007 to 2012, I bought a new old silver one on Ebay for £25 recently, and I mostly just feel the smoothness and admire its iconic Toys R'Us body design which reminds me of a 195Os Vespa scooter, and occasionally I shoot it.

The Stylus 1s is an ugly boxy beast with an inadequate grip but has other redeeming qualities.

Thanks,

Mike

 Mikedigi's gear list:Mikedigi's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ8 Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS7 Olympus Stylus 1s Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ300
OP Stevie Boy Blue Senior Member • Posts: 1,519
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
1

Sue Anne Rush wrote:

Excellent review and I am happy with my Panasonic Z1000 ii.

Thank you, Sue Anne

I’m pleased you’re happy with your choice of camera; welcome to the FZ club.

Cheers…

Stevie Boy Blue wrote:

Please note that this is an addition to the original and extensive review of the FZ330 that I compiled back in October 2019. See here:

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/63244070

Primarily this extension is born of a response to a question posed by DPR’s Barney Britton to Yosuke Yamane, director of Panasonic’s Imaging Division, in an interview published on March 30th 2021:

Asked whether there is still a market for compact cameras (under which bridge models like the FZ330 fall)? Mr. Yamane indicated that, although the Covid-19 damaged digital camera market was now recovering, interest in compacts is shrinking whilst demand for mirrorless models has grown steadily. With video production and live streaming demands diversified, he predicts the role of mirrorless cameras will continue to expand.

Hence, although he doesn’t state that Panasonic’s range of compacts (and FZ cameras) have no future, Mr. Yamane does admit the company will continue to strengthen full-frame and M4/3rd systems, thereby at least implying what many of us have suspected for a good while now. Yep, I believe it’s now fair and possibly accurate to presume that Panasonic’s development of compact cameras, including FZs – and especially those with pinhead 1/2.3 sensors – has been well and truly shelved for the foreseeable future at least. Perhaps 1-inch sensor models aside, could it even be that the FZ330 is the last camera of its kind that we’ll ever see from the company?

Hmmm, imagine if that were true rather than merely my own fairly justifiable assumption. Where exactly would it leave FZ fans like me and countless others who have bought and enjoyed this range of camera for many years?

Well, although I can’t and wouldn’t attempt to speak for all, as one of this range’s biggest and most longstanding fans, a shelved developmental line actually does not affect or bother me in the slightest – at least beyond postponing the excitement I always felt at the prospect of a brand new release/purchase.

That’s because the FZ330 will always be the FZ330 and nothing less. It remains in production with no sign whatsoever of being phased out any time soon. It just might never be upgraded. But logically, would that be such a bad thing when you can still buy one that rolled off the production line as recently as last month or next, and the one after that if you continue to wait as long as you like?

Despite it being in its 6th (yes sixth) year of production, the FZ330 is no less the absolutely superb camera today than it was when released back in 2015. Its 25mm to 600mm F2.8 aperture lens has still never been surpassed or even equalled by any other manufacturer.

It takes astonishingly good photographs for any camera in its class – of course within the limits of its tiny sensor. It’s splash and dust resistant, shoots 4K video and has a fast burst rate for capturing stills of action sequences. All in all and in my personal opinion, the FZ330 is the best camera of its kind made by any manufacturer, not just Panasonic but all of those so-called bigger brands, too. In the 1/2.3 sensor category, even in 2021 THE FZ330 REMAINS KING OF ALL BRIDGE CAMERAS for the money we pay. Nothing else comes remotely close to it.

And so, to remind some whilst enlightening others to the camera’s sheer versatility, I submit the following image examples for readers’ to view. Please note that although all photos have been resized and/or cropped for uploading through a relatively slow internet connection, they are all Jpegs as they appeared straight out of the camera. Note that I’ve also included my settings, too. (See the relevant illustration for that particular revelation, one which I first published way back in 2015.)

I do not shoot RAW and I rarely post process any image that I do not print. These are OOC Jpegs resized, just like all those examples in my first review.

In the main, those initial shots in the first review were indicators of the camera’s potential as mainly a wildlife tool when we can get close enough to fill as much as the frame as possible with the subject. That is and always will be key to rendering fine fur and feather detail on pinhead sensors that simply do not afford the crop-ability of larger sensors such as M4/3rd or bigger.

This latest set is more to outline what the camera is capable of as a do-it-all, carry everywhere prospect that shows little limitations when kept under ISO 800 and where light levels are at least reasonable to very good. Remember, at the end of the day, this is a bridge camera with a small sensor. In many respects it has the means to surprise or even stun us with the quality of image it can produce, particularly in capable hands and when set up optimally. But if you require professional levels of consistency across the board at all times, maybe you’ll need a model with a much larger sensor for a much larger price.

As I have already said, for the money, the FZ330’s top of all in its class. If you want the very best camera of all, then you’ll be shelling out thousands rather than hundreds and are sure to be changing lenses for all manner of things that the FZ330 can muster minus such inconveniences. As ever, the choice is yours.

But you can rest assured that despite every incarnation of smart phone representing another nail in the coffin of most compact cameras, the FZ300 is simply too versatile a machine to fall victim to the mainstream trends. On the contrary, I’ve had it confirmed by no less than five respected UK retailers in the last few days that the FZ330 remains a very popular seller indeed. I’m in no way surprised by that.

All in all, the FZ330 is as good a camera today as it was when released almost six years ago. That is just how far ahead of its time it was back in 2015. And if it’s the last small sensor FZ flagship model we ever get to appreciate, many of us will be celebrating it as one of Panasonic’s greatest ever achievements for years to come. That said it’s clearly going nowhere for the moment and my guess is that the FZ330 will remain in production for at least another two to three years before the competition finally catches up.

Admittedly I’d liked to have seen DFD autofocus tech replaced or updated with something a little less temperamental, but that’s the only real criticism I could sling in the FZ330’s direction from a purely intermittent perspective. 90% of the time, the camera focuses flawlessly but I’m as sure as I can be that it could be made even more reliable in an upgrade that we may or may not eventually see. Who knows?

No worries either way, because when push comes to shove I’ll simply keep on buying brand new FZ330’s as each unit becomes long in the tooth. I’m already using my second one and will undoubtedly purchase a couple more in preference to anything else currently available as and when required.

In closing, did I tell you just how highly I rate the FZ330? If not, please feel free to read and read again. After all, you now have two parts of this review to study at your leisure. Just in case you missed it, here’s another link to part one:

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/63244070

Thank you very much reading my review (s). If you already own the FZ330, you might appreciate why I’m so enthusiastic about the camera. If not, then I urge you to at least check one out at your favourite retailer.

All the best and happy shooting…

PLEASE NOTE. No image examples included in this review were taken with a TC added. FZ330 only!

Click on image to expand

Click on image to expand

Ps: The full interview with Mr. Yamane that sparked this second section of my FZ330 review can be read here:

https://www.dpreview.com/interviews/8480678649/panasonic-interview-we-will-strengthen-both-full-frame-and-m43?utm_source=self-desktop&utm_medium=marquee&utm_campaign=traffic_source

Cheers…

OP Stevie Boy Blue Senior Member • Posts: 1,519
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
1

Vlad53 wrote:

Excellent Stevie! This is one more and much detailed answer to my FZ150 vs. FZ300. Thank you again!

Vladimir

Thank you, Vladimir.

You’re welcome. I’m pleased to have been of some help to you both here and on your dedicated thread.

Assuming you go on to obtain an FZ330, please pop back and let us know how you get on with the camera. I’m aware that not everyone likes to or wants to post their photos here, but just a few words of opinion about the camera will suffice if you’d be kind enough to offer such feedback.

Cheers…

OP Stevie Boy Blue Senior Member • Posts: 1,519
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
1

Dale108 wrote:

Another great summary and homage to the FZ300.

Dale

Thanks for the compliment, and for popping in, Dale.

I always appreciate a reply from any fellow owner of the FZ330 (300), as we’re the ones who truly get what the camera offers for the price and sensor size.

Cheers…

Stevie Boy Blue wrote:

Please note that this is an addition to the original and extensive review of the FZ330 that I compiled back in October 2019. See here:

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/63244070

Primarily this extension is born of a response to a question posed by DPR’s Barney Britton to Yosuke Yamane, director of Panasonic’s Imaging Division, in an interview published on March 30th 2021:

Asked whether there is still a market for compact cameras (under which bridge models like the FZ330 fall)? Mr. Yamane indicated that, although the Covid-19 damaged digital camera market was now recovering, interest in compacts is shrinking whilst demand for mirrorless models has grown steadily. With video production and live streaming demands diversified, he predicts the role of mirrorless cameras will continue to expand.

Hence, although he doesn’t state that Panasonic’s range of compacts (and FZ cameras) have no future, Mr. Yamane does admit the company will continue to strengthen full-frame and M4/3rd systems, thereby at least implying what many of us have suspected for a good while now. Yep, I believe it’s now fair and possibly accurate to presume that Panasonic’s development of compact cameras, including FZs – and especially those with pinhead 1/2.3 sensors – has been well and truly shelved for the foreseeable future at least. Perhaps 1-inch sensor models aside, could it even be that the FZ330 is the last camera of its kind that we’ll ever see from the company?

Hmmm, imagine if that were true rather than merely my own fairly justifiable assumption. Where exactly would it leave FZ fans like me and countless others who have bought and enjoyed this range of camera for many years?

Well, although I can’t and wouldn’t attempt to speak for all, as one of this range’s biggest and most longstanding fans, a shelved developmental line actually does not affect or bother me in the slightest – at least beyond postponing the excitement I always felt at the prospect of a brand new release/purchase.

That’s because the FZ330 will always be the FZ330 and nothing less. It remains in production with no sign whatsoever of being phased out any time soon. It just might never be upgraded. But logically, would that be such a bad thing when you can still buy one that rolled off the production line as recently as last month or next, and the one after that if you continue to wait as long as you like?

Despite it being in its 6th (yes sixth) year of production, the FZ330 is no less the absolutely superb camera today than it was when released back in 2015. Its 25mm to 600mm F2.8 aperture lens has still never been surpassed or even equalled by any other manufacturer.

It takes astonishingly good photographs for any camera in its class – of course within the limits of its tiny sensor. It’s splash and dust resistant, shoots 4K video and has a fast burst rate for capturing stills of action sequences. All in all and in my personal opinion, the FZ330 is the best camera of its kind made by any manufacturer, not just Panasonic but all of those so-called bigger brands, too. In the 1/2.3 sensor category, even in 2021 THE FZ330 REMAINS KING OF ALL BRIDGE CAMERAS for the money we pay. Nothing else comes remotely close to it.

And so, to remind some whilst enlightening others to the camera’s sheer versatility, I submit the following image examples for readers’ to view. Please note that although all photos have been resized and/or cropped for uploading through a relatively slow internet connection, they are all Jpegs as they appeared straight out of the camera. Note that I’ve also included my settings, too. (See the relevant illustration for that particular revelation, one which I first published way back in 2015.)

I do not shoot RAW and I rarely post process any image that I do not print. These are OOC Jpegs resized, just like all those examples in my first review.

In the main, those initial shots in the first review were indicators of the camera’s potential as mainly a wildlife tool when we can get close enough to fill as much as the frame as possible with the subject. That is and always will be key to rendering fine fur and feather detail on pinhead sensors that simply do not afford the crop-ability of larger sensors such as M4/3rd or bigger.

This latest set is more to outline what the camera is capable of as a do-it-all, carry everywhere prospect that shows little limitations when kept under ISO 800 and where light levels are at least reasonable to very good. Remember, at the end of the day, this is a bridge camera with a small sensor. In many respects it has the means to surprise or even stun us with the quality of image it can produce, particularly in capable hands and when set up optimally. But if you require professional levels of consistency across the board at all times, maybe you’ll need a model with a much larger sensor for a much larger price.

As I have already said, for the money, the FZ330’s top of all in its class. If you want the very best camera of all, then you’ll be shelling out thousands rather than hundreds and are sure to be changing lenses for all manner of things that the FZ330 can muster minus such inconveniences. As ever, the choice is yours.

But you can rest assured that despite every incarnation of smart phone representing another nail in the coffin of most compact cameras, the FZ300 is simply too versatile a machine to fall victim to the mainstream trends. On the contrary, I’ve had it confirmed by no less than five respected UK retailers in the last few days that the FZ330 remains a very popular seller indeed. I’m in no way surprised by that.

All in all, the FZ330 is as good a camera today as it was when released almost six years ago. That is just how far ahead of its time it was back in 2015. And if it’s the last small sensor FZ flagship model we ever get to appreciate, many of us will be celebrating it as one of Panasonic’s greatest ever achievements for years to come. That said it’s clearly going nowhere for the moment and my guess is that the FZ330 will remain in production for at least another two to three years before the competition finally catches up.

Admittedly I’d liked to have seen DFD autofocus tech replaced or updated with something a little less temperamental, but that’s the only real criticism I could sling in the FZ330’s direction from a purely intermittent perspective. 90% of the time, the camera focuses flawlessly but I’m as sure as I can be that it could be made even more reliable in an upgrade that we may or may not eventually see. Who knows?

No worries either way, because when push comes to shove I’ll simply keep on buying brand new FZ330’s as each unit becomes long in the tooth. I’m already using my second one and will undoubtedly purchase a couple more in preference to anything else currently available as and when required.

In closing, did I tell you just how highly I rate the FZ330? If not, please feel free to read and read again. After all, you now have two parts of this review to study at your leisure. Just in case you missed it, here’s another link to part one:

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/63244070

Thank you very much reading my review (s). If you already own the FZ330, you might appreciate why I’m so enthusiastic about the camera. If not, then I urge you to at least check one out at your favourite retailer.

All the best and happy shooting…

PLEASE NOTE. No image examples included in this review were taken with a TC added. FZ330 only!

Click on image to expand

Click on image to expand

Ps: The full interview with Mr. Yamane that sparked this second section of my FZ330 review can be read here:

https://www.dpreview.com/interviews/8480678649/panasonic-interview-we-will-strengthen-both-full-frame-and-m43?utm_source=self-desktop&utm_medium=marquee&utm_campaign=traffic_source

Cheers…

OP Stevie Boy Blue Senior Member • Posts: 1,519
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
1

DUBTEMPLE wrote:

For sure, likely the best and most overall pinhead ever made

I upped my worn out FZ200 for a FZ100 MkI, (with no regret)

But stilll I consider to get a FZ300 also ,..

So much more since I got the Nikon TC-E17ED and 15ED still around

Got the FZ80 also ,.. but find it terrible

Panasonic is a mixed bag for sure

Sad that this segment of cameras seems deadended

Dont know where to go from here for main-camera ,.. DSLR is Canon now

But video is also an factor from here, starting up with Davinci Resolve 17 Studio

Maybe Nikon Z6, got BlackMagic RAW, etc,..

But the FZ's will always be in the backpack on travels

Thanks for the reply, Dubtemple.

As you’ve owned a FZ200, I’m sure you’d appreciate the FZ330 more should you ever get around to buying a copy.

Yep, I’m aware of how ‘terrible’ the FZ80 is and I sympathise with anyone and everyone who regards it as such. I’ll refrain from rehashing too many of my opinions of it here though, as some over-sensitive owners take criticism of their camera personally. Realistically, though, there’s no escaping the fact that everyone – and I really do mean everyone – struggles to capture fine fur and feather detail in OOC Jpegs with the FZ80 set at full 1200mm focal length. Not to worry though. I’ve always been a once bitten twice shy kind of person, so there’s no way I’d ever consider buying another FZ80 or recommending it to anyone else when my Fuji S1 returns the quality of images I require from longer focal lengths beyond my 600mm FZ330. There we go, back on topic now.

Good luck in all your future choices – especially in picking out a new ‘main camera’.

Cheers…

OP Stevie Boy Blue Senior Member • Posts: 1,519
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
1

PJPfeiffer wrote:

Excellent write up!

The members of my photo club owning full frame DSLRs are amazed by the capabilities and results obtained with my FZ300.

Most of these images came from my FZ300 https://flickr.com/photos/pjpfeiffer/

The most recent moon images excluded (iPhone 11 Pro attached to my telescope)

Thank you PJP.

Yeah, funny you should mention how members of your photo club are amazed by the capabilities of the FZ330. One of the five retailers I approached for feedback on up-to-date sales of the camera for the purposes of this review said similar about one FZ330 owner who wins most of his club’s competitions despite most other entrants’ submissions coming from DSLR gear.

Truth is, before the pandemic and social distancing, I occasionally rubbed shoulders with Pro wildlife photographers, most of whom would look at my FZ330 and conclude I was a mere point-and-shoot hobbyist.

Long story short, I used to carry a thin album containing a dozen or so of my photos printed at 12 x 8 inches in my car boot that I would show to the one guy I actually liked in the whole bunch. So as not to appear like I’m blowing my own trumpet too loudly: Let’s just say that once a few more of the crowd peered over my shoulder and noticed the level of detail that the FZ330 can render in print, their preconceived ideas about both me and my camera changed completely.

Funny thing is, I kind of liked being underestimated and not taken seriously as a photographer just because I shoot with FZs in preference to ‘proper pro gear’ that costs thousands and thousands of pounds (or whatever). Just goes to show the level of gear-snobbery and attitude that exists within this game of ours.

When asked why I choose FZs over digital ILCs for wildlife? I always give the honest reply that for the money and what I require of them, these bridge cameras are more than good enough when we know how to use them to their strengths and can fill as much of the frame as possible with the subject. Not everyone can close enough to do this, including some of those so-called pros who rely so much on cropping images down from bigger sensors. Nothing wrong with either method. I just enjoy the extra challenge involved with getting as close as I physically can.

By the way, I enjoyed viewing your flickr page. You have some very nice shots on there. Very well done and thank you for the link.

Cheers…

OP Stevie Boy Blue Senior Member • Posts: 1,519
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
1

GeraldW wrote:

I'm sure that was a lot of work for you to put together. So, thank you for that, and for review #1. Very nice shots, and great Depth of Field, one of the benefits of the small sensor. Rather than isolating the subject from the background, I find a lot of in-focus depth "invites you into the scene". And with the small sensor and fast lens, you can get that kind of DoF at large apertures and low ISO settings.

Your recommended settings for the FZ330 are very close, if not identical, to what I used for my "good" FZ200's and for the first FZ300 I had. My second FZ300 has been ordered and should arrive mid-week.

Since I came into a little extra money recently, I was considering going back to an interchangeable lens camera, and building up a system. But my 1" sensor fixed lens cameras are more than good enough; and what I really needed was a ruggedized and weather sealed camera - enter the FZ300.

Thanks Jerry.

Indeed, this review part 2 did involve a lot of work to put together, as did part one and many other lengthy contributions I make to DPR.

Thank you for the acknowledgment of the time and effort I invest. Very kind and thoughtful of you and you’re welcome to this and part one.

Yes, I like the extra DOF afforded by the small sensor, as I appreciate more things being in focus in some scenes like landscapes. To be fair, it wouldn’t bother me had Panasonic fixed the FZ330 aperture to F4 with no option to change across the lens range, as 90% of my shots are taken there regardless of focal length. We get the depth at wide angle and can achieve subject isolation at 600mm. What’s not to like about that? As for F2.8, I rarely use it and would not miss it at all.

I may be wrong as I don’t have my copy to hand. But I thought the FZ200’s parameters for changing noise reduction, sharpening, etc, were different to the FZ330 incrementally. I recall the FZ200 may have only offered adjustment from 0 to minus or + 2 or 3. If so, I’m not sure how you set up the FZ300, which offers 5 steps either way, to match your FZ200? You’ve got me puzzled there!

Please excuse me if I’m wrong on this, as I don’t have time to verify things. I know for sure though that the FZ150 only went from 0 to minus or + 2 in either direction and there’s a chance I may be mixing that up with the FZ200.

Not to worry either way. The important thing is that you’ve ordered your second FZ300 and I hope it serves you well. At least it will save you from all that lens-changing palaver had you chosen the other route.

Have fun with your new toy.

Thanks again for the post. I appreciate it.

Cheers…

OP Stevie Boy Blue Senior Member • Posts: 1,519
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
2

Al Ball wrote:

Stevie

You have a way with words and a knack with your fz300 that must inspire more people than me.

After reading what you write all I want to do is go outside and shoot photographs.

Your natural talent is a blessing and we are lucky to have you on these forums.

I did not see part 2 of your review coming but enjoyed reading it as much as the first one.

Thank you for taking the time to prepare and post it.

The photos you included look great as always and showcase what the camera does across its range.

You know that I recently bought a fz300 and I will update you on my progress here.

Since buying it I have not used my G9 kit as much as I was doing.

Not saying fz300 full res IQ is a match for the G9 but it is better than I expected for sensor size.

12mp is about right for the fz by the look of things.

Been messing around with j-peg settings and will try the ones you used with AWB changes.

Have not picked up my canon sx70 since buying the fz because I am getting close enough to subjects without it for now.

It is still early days because I have only had the fz300 for just over a week. But I am very impressed by it so far.

Cannot believe how well it handles and how solid it feels for a bridge camera at its price point.

Would be a shame if Panasonic dropped the fz line. But as you say the fz300 is still a popular seller.

Will let you know how I progress over the next few weeks.

I posted today mostly to say that I am really grateful for your experience and writings and for this review part 2.

Well, Al. What can I say? But thank you for the very kind words.

You know something, if I ‘inspire’ only you to pick up your camera and get out shooting with it, I’m more than happy to know that.

All I can do is my best to inform, but I’m aware that my direct writing style is not appreciated by all. However, as this way of communication is second nature to folks like me who are on the autistic spectrum, the literal, tell-it-as-I-see-it method is all I’ve ever known. So, thank you very much again for the compliments.

I contribute my time and efforts on here completely free of remuneration. In fact, these days I’m more inclined to receive a headache and eyestrain as payback for my labours on the computer. So I am happy when acknowledgment of my effort is returned from readers like you and others here. Thank you again for your kindness and appreciation.

Moving on: I’m really pleased that you’re enjoying your new FZ330. As you rightly point out, image quality from the smaller sensor won’t quite match your M4/3 G9 at full resolution. But the FZ is surprisingly good for a ‘pinhead’ machine.

To be honest, I’m not surprised to note that both the G9 and your SX70 have taken a backseat in terms of pecking order for a while. The FZ330 has a way of charming users into making it the first choice option for which they reach when portability and convenience are prioritised over extra weight and all that changing lenses malarkey associated with the alternative. Even a slightly larger and heavier bridge camera becomes second or third choice, simply because the FZ330 is just so good at what it does.

Anyway, enough said. Please do keep me/us here informed of your progress with the camera.

By all means try the Jpeg settings I suggest in the review, with a starting point being to leave sharpening at default 0 when noise reduction is set to – 5. Initially increasing sharpening over negated noise reduction may appear like overkill during playback especially on a large screen. All depends on personal taste but I’m sure you’ll already appreciate that. Armed with a reasonably sound starting point, I’ll leave you to get on with finding your own individual preferences. Have fun.

Thanks again…

OP Stevie Boy Blue Senior Member • Posts: 1,519
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
1

Mikedigi wrote:

Yes Steve, I agree with the whole of your FZ330 Review Part 2.

It would just be nice if the FZ330 had ND filters built in, but one cannot have everything and for around £350 these days, it is incomparable value for money.

I share your enthusiasm for the FZ330 TeleMacro fun, shooting small objects from 39"/1 metre distance at max 600mm optical zoom, but I would add that I sometimes use this Telemacro at any focal length from 300 to max 600mm focal length, whereas my lovely FZ8 could "only" do Telemacro at its max focal length 432mm.

And, essential for me, the FZ330 is a great SOOC JPEG shooter, much improved over previous FZs.

I use Aperture Priority mode, on f4 when possible, Vivid Photo Style, Contrast 0, Sharpness 0, NR -5, Saturation +1, AWB 2 clicks to Amber, no i-settings.

And my FZ330 only cost me £300 from Panasonic Outlet about 4 years ago, a refurb but as good as new with full warranty.

I only need 2 other cameras - my Olympus Stylus 1s, which is also brilliant and does a lot of what the FZ330 will do, but is about half the size and weight; and my old TZ10/ZS7, which is my only belt camera and is good enough for the job.

Having enjoyed an FZ8 from 2007 to 2012, I bought a new old silver one on Ebay for £25 recently, and I mostly just feel the smoothness and admire its iconic Toys R'Us body design which reminds me of a 195Os Vespa scooter, and occasionally I shoot it.

The Stylus 1s is an ugly boxy beast with an inadequate grip but has other redeeming qualities.

Thanks,

Mike

Thanks for the input, Mike.

Good of ya to pop in and I’m pleased you agree with my part two instalment.

You’re right to suggest that we cannot have everything on board cameras like this. Hence no ND filers unless you go FZ2000.

But let’s be honest here, the video capabilities of the 330 aren’t good enough to warrant the NDs. Only still shooters of moving water and the like would benefit from them, and at the end of the day they are cheap enough to buy as an accessory if required. Got to preserve the uniqueness of that 2000 crème del la crème flagship top of the whole FZ range job, eh?

To be honest though, I wouldn’t change a thing about the FZ330 beyond making its DFD autofocus system less prone to becoming confused by certain contrasted situations. Even if it meant Panasonic adopting phase detection or a hybrid of that and DFD that could be changed from one to the other by the user.

I know that DFD tech is being improved all the time (also mentioned in the linked interview), but many of us users who bump into its problems the most are becoming more and more impatient awaiting a suitable upgrade.

Plus, I’ve never been convinced that DFD was ever the way to go in terms of the pinhead sensor. Still, we have what we have, and compared to what other manufacturers offer as alternatives in this category, the FZ330 is still the camera to beat for the price.

Looks like you got an extra bargain buy with the refurb. Nice one.

Thanks again…

Kingate Cavies New Member • Posts: 11
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
1

Hi Al, can I just ask, have you had any problem with movement of the LCD touchscreen when turned around to face outwards?  Mine seems to not snap in place and seems to wobble, just don't know if the is normal or not?  Considering sending it back!!  Sue

 Kingate Cavies's gear list:Kingate Cavies's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-LZ2
OP Stevie Boy Blue Senior Member • Posts: 1,519
Re: **FZ330 REVIEW Part 2 by Stevie Boy Blue**
2

I can’t speak for Al, Sue, and he may offer a different answer if and when he responds.

But if it helps whilst I'm online, I don’t use the touch screen and leave mine permanently turned inward. I frame and review images through the viewfinder. Consequently all articulating LCDs remain as new on my cameras no matter their age.

Your post, however, just prompted me to check both FZ330s that I own, plus one of my FZ2000s.

When the screen is closed (facing inward) on any camera, slight movement of around 1 to 2 mm can be felt and seen by manipulating the side opposite the hinge.

When the LCD is turned around to use as a touch screen, there is slightly more movement (approx 1mm more) available up or down opposite the hinge. I suspect it is manufactured that way, as a means to ensure the hinge action remains free to operate.

I can see how the screen may move through touch. If yours has more play in it than I suggest, it may be worth returning the camera.

Good luck…

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