Can someone explain this photo?

Started 2 months ago | Questions
Chris5437 Junior Member • Posts: 48
Can someone explain this photo?

Shot on an M6ii with 1/4000 electronic shutter (in raw burst mode). At that shutter speed I would expect the motion to be frozen? At least hummingbird wings are frozen at that speed, surely this small bird is not faster than that. I'm guessing this is something to do with the electronic shutter? I am aware of rolling shutter for panning shots, but this was not that.

Does anyone know why this happened?

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R2D2 Forum Pro • Posts: 22,686
Re: Can someone explain this photo?

Chris5437 wrote:

Shot on an M6ii with 1/4000 electronic shutter (in raw burst mode). At that shutter speed I would expect the motion to be frozen? At least hummingbird wings are frozen at that speed, surely this small bird is not faster than that. I'm guessing this is something to do with the electronic shutter? I am aware of rolling shutter for panning shots, but this was not that.

Same principle.

Does anyone know why this happened?

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Rock and Rollei Senior Member • Posts: 2,304
Re: Can someone explain this photo?
4

Did you take it a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away? Looks like  an X-wing swallow to me.
(I think it's indeed rolling shutter, FWIW)

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OP Chris5437 Junior Member • Posts: 48
Re: Can someone explain this photo?

X-Wing swallow indeed πŸ˜‚.  R2D2, what confuses me is that I've taken photos of hummingbirds with similar settings but this is the first time I've seen this affect. Is it simply that this wing was moving faster horizontally? Or is there some other contributing factor?

Actually I use the raw burst mode quite often but this is the first time I've seen this effect; but also the first time shooting this particular bird.

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OP Chris5437 Junior Member • Posts: 48
Re: Can someone explain this photo?
4

Technical correction; tie-fighter swallow

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Sittatunga Senior Member • Posts: 2,941
Re: Can someone explain this photo?
4

Chris5437 wrote:

Shot on an M6ii with 1/4000 electronic shutter (in raw burst mode). At that shutter speed I would expect the motion to be frozen? At least hummingbird wings are frozen at that speed, surely this small bird is not faster than that. I'm guessing this is something to do with the electronic shutter? I am aware of rolling shutter for panning shots, but this was not that.

Does anyone know why this happened?

The electronic shutter takes just under a twentieth of a second to scan from top to bottom of the frame.  It manages a 1/4000 shutter speed by reading a strip of the sensor just over 80 microns wide at that scanning speed, in the same way that the curtains of a focal plane shutter don't open completely at speeds faster than the X-synch speed.

In this case it looks as if the electronic shutter caught the tips of the wings at the top when it opened and followed them down.  It's rolling shutter, the same as the bendy golf club or aeroplane propellor pictures you see from time to time.

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R2D2 Forum Pro • Posts: 22,686
Re: Can someone explain this photo?

Chris5437 wrote:

Technical correction; tie-fighter swallow

LOL, too funny!Β 

R2

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R2D2 Forum Pro • Posts: 22,686
Re: Can someone explain this photo?
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Chris5437 wrote:

X-Wing swallow indeed πŸ˜‚. R2D2, what confuses me is that I've taken photos of hummingbirds with similar settings but this is the first time I've seen this affect. Is it simply that this wing was moving faster horizontally? Or is there some other contributing factor?

Actually I use the raw burst mode quite often but this is the first time I've seen this effect; but also the first time shooting this particular bird.

+1 What Sittatunga wrote.

This "effect" is exacerbated by closeness to the subject, and increased angular velocity (in the case of fast-moving wings).

Fortunately it's a pretty rare occurrence (IME) and I haven't seen it very often myself, though I don't use RAW burst mode very much (I normally use a standard high speed mShutter burst). I think I only have one M6ii shot saved that exhibits something similar, though not identical...

Rolling shutter effect. Ghost wings.

And one from the R5...

Click on original size to see the "aliasing" more clearly on the wingtips.

I've shot lots of hummers too (mostly with mShutter but some with eShutter) and haven't found rolling shutter to be a problem. So keep on doing what works for you!

R2

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