Bevis Gear Top Shelf Bag

Started 8 months ago | Discussions
mujana Veteran Member • Posts: 7,492
Re: Bevis Gear Top Shelf Bag

Chris 222 wrote:

Doug Greenberg wrote:

SDreamer wrote:

I saw this too and thought it was cool. But when I thought about the weight I thought that wouldn't work, especially since all of whatever weight is on one shoulder. Then I thought, what photography style would benefit from this? The delay you get from changing lenses is already enough I think to miss the moment.

I often go out hiking with my binoculars, and also a camera and telephoto (say, a Nikon Z7 and 500mm PF lens) but I don't always want the camera rig "out" and exposed and possibly flopping around. If I see a bird or animal I want to photograph, I then get out the camera rig, which involves taking the pack off, etc. With the Top Shelf system, I could get access to the camera/lens very quickly. That's what it's good for. I also would want a bit of room for a rain jacket or second lens, or lunch. The size of this bag seems about right for all of this, though I can't comment on the weight, the precise ergonomics, etc.

This sling is very heavy for a 22L pack.

And such a design is simply horrible for hiking, unless by "hiking" one means very short jaunts.

We all know there is no perfect camera bag. If a bag is good for some functions or features, it lacks in others. That's why some of us end up with so many camera bags.

True, but one can do FAR better in terms of the comfort/accessibility/protection/price ratio.

Ok. What’s your suggestion….that one small camera (back)pack that does far better in both comfort and accessibility and protection?

 mujana's gear list:mujana's gear list
Sigma DP3 Merrill Sony a7R IV Zeiss Batis 85mm F1.8 Sony FE 16-35mm F2.8 +9 more
Chris 222 Senior Member • Posts: 1,511
Re: Bevis Gear Top Shelf Bag

mujana wrote:

Chris 222 wrote:

Doug Greenberg wrote:

SDreamer wrote:

I saw this too and thought it was cool. But when I thought about the weight I thought that wouldn't work, especially since all of whatever weight is on one shoulder. Then I thought, what photography style would benefit from this? The delay you get from changing lenses is already enough I think to miss the moment.

I often go out hiking with my binoculars, and also a camera and telephoto (say, a Nikon Z7 and 500mm PF lens) but I don't always want the camera rig "out" and exposed and possibly flopping around. If I see a bird or animal I want to photograph, I then get out the camera rig, which involves taking the pack off, etc. With the Top Shelf system, I could get access to the camera/lens very quickly. That's what it's good for. I also would want a bit of room for a rain jacket or second lens, or lunch. The size of this bag seems about right for all of this, though I can't comment on the weight, the precise ergonomics, etc.

This sling is very heavy for a 22L pack.

And such a design is simply horrible for hiking, unless by "hiking" one means very short jaunts.

We all know there is no perfect camera bag. If a bag is good for some functions or features, it lacks in others. That's why some of us end up with so many camera bags.

True, but one can do FAR better in terms of the comfort/accessibility/protection/price ratio.

Ok. What’s your suggestion….that one small camera (back)pack that does far better in both comfort and accessibility and protection?

I published this resource on DPR a while back, NOT a quick read but it contains tons of far better options, some of which we have used for decades:

BEST BACKPACK / RUCKSACK FOR HIKING PHOTOGRAPHERS (2021)

Malling Contributing Member • Posts: 622
Re: Bevis Gear Top Shelf Bag

mujana wrote:

Chris 222 wrote:

Doug Greenberg wrote:

SDreamer wrote:

I saw this too and thought it was cool. But when I thought about the weight I thought that wouldn't work, especially since all of whatever weight is on one shoulder. Then I thought, what photography style would benefit from this? The delay you get from changing lenses is already enough I think to miss the moment.

I often go out hiking with my binoculars, and also a camera and telephoto (say, a Nikon Z7 and 500mm PF lens) but I don't always want the camera rig "out" and exposed and possibly flopping around. If I see a bird or animal I want to photograph, I then get out the camera rig, which involves taking the pack off, etc. With the Top Shelf system, I could get access to the camera/lens very quickly. That's what it's good for. I also would want a bit of room for a rain jacket or second lens, or lunch. The size of this bag seems about right for all of this, though I can't comment on the weight, the precise ergonomics, etc.

This sling is very heavy for a 22L pack.

And such a design is simply horrible for hiking, unless by "hiking" one means very short jaunts.

We all know there is no perfect camera bag. If a bag is good for some functions or features, it lacks in others. That's why some of us end up with so many camera bags.

True, but one can do FAR better in terms of the comfort/accessibility/protection/price ratio.

Ok. What’s your suggestion….that one small camera (back)pack that does far better in both comfort and accessibility and protection?

Every backpack offer the same protection with a cube or pouches inside like +90% of all camera backs, the only ones that dos better is a hard shell or something like the protactic but these are also very uncomfortable to use and certainly you cannot or rather shouldn’t hike with them. 
Accessibility can easily be sorted and often even beat a dedicated bag.. there are many pockets you can use or things you can attach making if far faster then a camera bag with backpanel and/or side access.

Obviously for a museum or similar you probably would need something else.

Doug Greenberg Contributing Member • Posts: 946
Re: Bevis Gear Top Shelf Bag
1

I have no experience with this bag, and though I did order one, I am perfectly prepared to hate it if it turns out to be awful. I am wondering if the people dead-set that this bag is "too heavy" base this on actually using the bag, or not?

It weighs 4.4 pounds. My Gura Gear Kiboko 22L pack weighs 3.7 pounds and I consider it quite light. Does that extra .7 pounds crack through some kind of qualitative barrier? I envision carrying this pack with my Nikon Z7, the FTZ adapter, and the Nikon 500mm f5.6 PF lens. The camera gear weighs 5.3 pounds, that makes a total of 9.7 pounds, and let's add a bit more for that extra battery and then a bit for the jacket shell or raincoat and my water bottle. Thirteen pounds, maybe? And I'll carry one smaller extra lens. 14 pounds!

I am no Macho Monster and am probably older than most people who post here, but I consider hiking with fourteen pounds on my back not particularly taxing, and I wonder how much lighter the bag would need to be to satisfy people who think it's too heavy but who still would want to carry all of the gear I allude to above. Would one pound lighter make all that much difference?

But no, I am not going to be hiking twelve miles up and down a mountain, I will likely walk a few miles on fairly forgiving terrain. For me, the key would be how well the sling characteristics work, i.e., how easy is it to manipulate the bag to get gear in and out, etc. It that feature works well I will forgive its not being ideal in other ways. We shall see.

 Doug Greenberg's gear list:Doug Greenberg's gear list
Nikon Coolpix P7800 Nikon D500 Nikon D850 Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 Nikon Z7 +11 more
Malling Contributing Member • Posts: 622
Re: Bevis Gear Top Shelf Bag

Doug Greenberg wrote:

I have no experience with this bag, and though I did order one, I am perfectly prepared to hate it if it turns out to be awful. I am wondering if the people dead-set that this bag is "too heavy" base this on actually using the bag, or not?

For many it’s probably based on other similar bags in the same weight category.

It weighs 4.4 pounds. My Gura Gear Kiboko 22L pack weighs 3.7 pounds and I consider it quite light. Does that extra .7 pounds crack through some kind of qualitative barrier? I envision carrying this pack with my Nikon Z7, the FTZ adapter, and the Nikon 500mm f5.6 PF lens. The camera gear weighs 5.3 pounds, that makes a total of 9.7 pounds, and let's add a bit more for that extra battery and then a bit for the jacket shell or raincoat and my water bottle. Thirteen pounds, maybe? And I'll carry one smaller extra lens. 14 pounds!

The weight of the bag can depend on the overall design, especially how well the bag carry a load and lead the weight to your hips. I tried bags that where lightweight that simply didn’t carried weight well and therefore felt heavier then a heavier bag that did carry it well. Other lightweight bags that dos carry well can over a certain limit start to feel worse then a heavier bag. So it really depends.

However such design can never truly carry it well so a heavy bag is always a downside compared to something similar weighing less.

I am no Macho Monster and am probably older than most people who post here, but I consider hiking with fourteen pounds on my back not particularly taxing, and I wonder how much lighter the bag would need to be to satisfy people who think it's too heavy but who still would want to carry all of the gear I allude to above. Would one pound lighter make all that much difference?

For such type of bags it should not exceed the 1kg mark by much… 2kg bags is simply not very comfortable to use if these dos not have great carrying capabilities.. This bag weighs as much as an expedition bag. But the latter that extra kg isn’t noticeable because these are designed to haul massive amount of gear and weight over long distances in rough conditions, that’s why these are typically rigid bulky heavy beasts. There simply isn’t a rational argument for this to be equally heavy, in fact there are no good arguments for camera bags to be as heavy as a expeditions packs.

But no, I am not going to be hiking twelve miles up and down a mountain, I will likely walk a few miles on fairly forgiving terrain. For me, the key would be how well the sling characteristics work, i.e., how easy is it to manipulate the bag to get gear in and out, etc. It that feature works well I will forgive its not being ideal in other ways. We shall see.

mujana Veteran Member • Posts: 7,492
Re: Bevis Gear Top Shelf Bag

Doug Greenberg wrote:

I have no experience with this bag, and though I did order one, I am perfectly prepared to hate it if it turns out to be awful. I am wondering if the people dead-set that this bag is "too heavy" base this on actually using the bag, or not?

It weighs 4.4 pounds. My Gura Gear Kiboko 22L pack weighs 3.7 pounds and I consider it quite light. Does that extra .7 pounds crack through some kind of qualitative barrier? I envision carrying this pack with my Nikon Z7, the FTZ adapter, and the Nikon 500mm f5.6 PF lens. The camera gear weighs 5.3 pounds, that makes a total of 9.7 pounds, and let's add a bit more for that extra battery and then a bit for the jacket shell or raincoat and my water bottle. Thirteen pounds, maybe? And I'll carry one smaller extra lens. 14 pounds!

I am no Macho Monster and am probably older than most people who post here, but I consider hiking with fourteen pounds on my back not particularly taxing, and I wonder how much lighter the bag would need to be to satisfy people who think it's too heavy but who still would want to carry all of the gear I allude to above. Would one pound lighter make all that much difference?

But no, I am not going to be hiking twelve miles up and down a mountain, I will likely walk a few miles on fairly forgiving terrain. For me, the key would be how well the sling characteristics work, i.e., how easy is it to manipulate the bag to get gear in and out, etc. It that feature works well I will forgive its not being ideal in other ways. We shall see.

Thank you Doug! Please keep us informed, once you receive and actually use this backpack. For me it’s not about long distance hikes. Just a comfortable, easy accessible and strong daypack for 1 camera and 3 not too heavy lenses (see my gear list).

 mujana's gear list:mujana's gear list
Sigma DP3 Merrill Sony a7R IV Zeiss Batis 85mm F1.8 Sony FE 16-35mm F2.8 +9 more
mujana Veteran Member • Posts: 7,492
Re: Bevis Gear Top Shelf Bag

Chris 222 wrote:

mujana wrote:

Chris 222 wrote:

Doug Greenberg wrote:

SDreamer wrote:

I saw this too and thought it was cool. But when I thought about the weight I thought that wouldn't work, especially since all of whatever weight is on one shoulder. Then I thought, what photography style would benefit from this? The delay you get from changing lenses is already enough I think to miss the moment.

I often go out hiking with my binoculars, and also a camera and telephoto (say, a Nikon Z7 and 500mm PF lens) but I don't always want the camera rig "out" and exposed and possibly flopping around. If I see a bird or animal I want to photograph, I then get out the camera rig, which involves taking the pack off, etc. With the Top Shelf system, I could get access to the camera/lens very quickly. That's what it's good for. I also would want a bit of room for a rain jacket or second lens, or lunch. The size of this bag seems about right for all of this, though I can't comment on the weight, the precise ergonomics, etc.

This sling is very heavy for a 22L pack.

And such a design is simply horrible for hiking, unless by "hiking" one means very short jaunts.

We all know there is no perfect camera bag. If a bag is good for some functions or features, it lacks in others. That's why some of us end up with so many camera bags.

True, but one can do FAR better in terms of the comfort/accessibility/protection/price ratio.

Ok. What’s your suggestion….that one small camera (back)pack that does far better in both comfort and accessibility and protection?

I published this resource on DPR a while back, NOT a quick read but it contains tons of far better options, some of which we have used for decades:

BEST BACKPACK / RUCKSACK FOR HIKING PHOTOGRAPHERS (2021)

Indeed not a quick read. Comfort and protection seem covered (so far, I prefer the Aztec material from MacPac for protection). Comfort is important for me, but in the last couple of years I only did short few hour/ day walks…no hiking like years ago in Nepal or Papua. Accessibility is still a question…they’re all still seem backpacks as we know them, with no easy and fast access to camera equipment, let alone changing lenses. But maybe I didn’t read enough, so far.

 mujana's gear list:mujana's gear list
Sigma DP3 Merrill Sony a7R IV Zeiss Batis 85mm F1.8 Sony FE 16-35mm F2.8 +9 more
Padaung New Member • Posts: 6
Re: Bevis Gear Top Shelf Bag

I ordered one from the KickStarter campaign, and it is due to arrive within the next 5 days.
I won't be using it for hiking long distances, but I do cover a lot of events (indoor and outdoor) for work where I'll carry a backpack and be regularly changing lenses during the day. This would often require me to take my current backpack off, place it on the ground, balance lenses as I swap them, etc, which is a pain. In fact I often resport to carrying two camera bodies over my shoulders so I have to change lens less frequently.
I'll report back once I receive it and have had a chance to use it for work (likely end of Aug/early Sept for the first jb where I'll need it - I'll continue to use my roller bag for more static jobs).
I echo the thoughts of others in that I hope they produce a smaller (and thus lighter) version at some point in the future too as there are days where I go out with a small selection of (3-4?) lenses.

Padaung New Member • Posts: 6
Re: Bevis Gear Top Shelf Bag

I also hope they consider making a deeper bag that can hold cameras with a vertical grip (either as part of the camera itself or as a separate accessory). I appreciaet this wold create a problem keeping lenses secure as the entire bag may then be too deep to keep them snug when laid sideways?
But my brother is an engineer too, and he says that his profession love a problem to solve

Doug Greenberg Contributing Member • Posts: 946
Re: Bevis Gear Top Shelf Bag
1

Padaung wrote:

I ordered one from the KickStarter campaign, and it is due to arrive within the next 5 days.
I won't be using it for hiking long distances, but I do cover a lot of events (indoor and outdoor) for work where I'll carry a backpack and be regularly changing lenses during the day. This would often require me to take my current backpack off, place it on the ground, balance lenses as I swap them, etc, which is a pain. In fact I often resport to carrying two camera bodies over my shoulders so I have to change lens less frequently.
I'll report back once I receive it and have had a chance to use it for work (likely end of Aug/early Sept for the first jb where I'll need it - I'll continue to use my roller bag for more static jobs).
I echo the thoughts of others in that I hope they produce a smaller (and thus lighter) version at some point in the future too as there are days where I go out with a small selection of (3-4?) lenses.

I received my bag two days ago. I had to puzzle over how it works (maybe I am a bit technologically challenged :-)), what with two straps and yet it is ideally a sling bag when the top shelf feature is used. I went back and watched a couple of the videos and figured it all out.

I think it's like the little girl with the little curl. For those situations and camera outfits it is suitable for, it's really a great bag. If the size and shape don't work with your gear, it's hopeless. With very little adjustment and practice (after watching the videos and scratching my head) I got it set up so I can access it and open it up quick, quick, quick. The locking mechanism works well, though one does have to listen for the "click" to be sure it has locked properly. It comes with lots of dividers (camera bags always come with many more dividers than I need, so I have quite a collection up in my attic).

As others have said, it is somewhat shallow, so when I use a larger lens with a hood sometimes the hood will not fit even reversed. Hmmmph. And a large body with a winder might be a tight fit or not a fit at all. It works great if I am carrying say, my Nikon Z7 with the 500mm PF lens, plus a couple of smaller lenses. For the Tamron 150-600 with the hood on, it's too small. I can see using it for a short hike in the field carrying my 500mm bird photography rig. Quick access when needed, out of the way when not needed.

There is no size of camera bag that is ideal for all possible rigs and situations. Personally, I would have been fine with it being just a bit bigger, particularly in terms of depth. Some people want a smaller bag. It seems very well made, though truthfully, I have not tested it in the field yet.

In response to this thread generally, I think it's clear that there is no one ideal camera bag or even type of bag, as people's requirements and expectations differ so much. If one is primarily a long-distance hiker, a backpacking bag will have comfort-related features that no bag made primarily for camera gear will have. But in my experience, such bags lack the features that I actually like about camera bags, including quick and easy access, internal padding, etc.

Since ordering the Top Shelf bag I bought (on sale!) a Mindshift Backlight 26l, which I actually think is preferable for most of my uses. It does not have a "quick lock" feature, but you can turn it around to the front without removing it and access it easily, and it has a small loop that goes over your head to stabilize it while it is open. It fits a somewhat larger rig than the Top Shelf Bag, and its ergonomics seems a bit better.

It's nice to have choices.

Doug Greenberg

 Doug Greenberg's gear list:Doug Greenberg's gear list
Nikon Coolpix P7800 Nikon D500 Nikon D850 Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 Nikon Z7 +11 more
mujana Veteran Member • Posts: 7,492
Re: Bevis Gear Top Shelf Bag

Doug Greenberg wrote:

Padaung wrote:

I ordered one from the KickStarter campaign, and it is due to arrive within the next 5 days.
I won't be using it for hiking long distances, but I do cover a lot of events (indoor and outdoor) for work where I'll carry a backpack and be regularly changing lenses during the day. This would often require me to take my current backpack off, place it on the ground, balance lenses as I swap them, etc, which is a pain. In fact I often resport to carrying two camera bodies over my shoulders so I have to change lens less frequently.
I'll report back once I receive it and have had a chance to use it for work (likely end of Aug/early Sept for the first jb where I'll need it - I'll continue to use my roller bag for more static jobs).
I echo the thoughts of others in that I hope they produce a smaller (and thus lighter) version at some point in the future too as there are days where I go out with a small selection of (3-4?) lenses.

I received my bag two days ago. I had to puzzle over how it works (maybe I am a bit technologically challenged :-)), what with two straps and yet it is ideally a sling bag when the top shelf feature is used. I went back and watched a couple of the videos and figured it all out.

I think it's like the little girl with the little curl. For those situations and camera outfits it is suitable for, it's really a great bag. If the size and shape don't work with your gear, it's hopeless. With very little adjustment and practice (after watching the videos and scratching my head) I got it set up so I can access it and open it up quick, quick, quick. The locking mechanism works well, though one does have to listen for the "click" to be sure it has locked properly. It comes with lots of dividers (camera bags always come with many more dividers than I need, so I have quite a collection up in my attic).

As others have said, it is somewhat shallow, so when I use a larger lens with a hood sometimes the hood will not fit even reversed. Hmmmph. And a large body with a winder might be a tight fit or not a fit at all. It works great if I am carrying say, my Nikon Z7 with the 500mm PF lens, plus a couple of smaller lenses. For the Tamron 150-600 with the hood on, it's too small. I can see using it for a short hike in the field carrying my 500mm bird photography rig. Quick access when needed, out of the way when not needed.

There is no size of camera bag that is ideal for all possible rigs and situations. Personally, I would have been fine with it being just a bit bigger, particularly in terms of depth. Some people want a smaller bag. It seems very well made, though truthfully, I have not tested it in the field yet.

In response to this thread generally, I think it's clear that there is no one ideal camera bag or even type of bag, as people's requirements and expectations differ so much. If one is primarily a long-distance hiker, a backpacking bag will have comfort-related features that no bag made primarily for camera gear will have. But in my experience, such bags lack the features that I actually like about camera bags, including quick and easy access, internal padding, etc.

Since ordering the Top Shelf bag I bought (on sale!) a Mindshift Backlight 26l, which I actually think is preferable for most of my uses. It does not have a "quick lock" feature, but you can turn it around to the front without removing it and access it easily, and it has a small loop that goes over your head to stabilize it while it is open. It fits a somewhat larger rig than the Top Shelf Bag, and its ergonomics seems a bit better.

It's nice to have choices.

Doug Greenberg

Thank you, Doug. Those are exactly the 2 bags I find interesting. Mindshift Rotation and the Bevis Gear Top Shelf Bag. For me it doesn’t have to be “deep”; I prefer small and not too “deep”.

 mujana's gear list:mujana's gear list
Sigma DP3 Merrill Sony a7R IV Zeiss Batis 85mm F1.8 Sony FE 16-35mm F2.8 +9 more
Peter Sch New Member • Posts: 1
Re: Bevis Gear Top Shelf Bag

Ich habe meine Tasche heute bekommen.

Zuerst habe ich mich auch damit beschäftigt die Tasche über die Schulter auf den Rücken zu bekommen um dann in den TopShelf-Modus zu kommen.
Ich gebe zu ich habe es inzwischen mehrfach wieder vergessen und musste mir das entsprechende Video hierzu ansehen.

Dann ging es ans Befüllen der Tasche. Hier merkte ich schnell, dass die Tasche um einiges kleiner ist als meine bisherigen Rucksäcke. Bisher standen alle meine Objektive ohne Probleme im Rucksack, mit meinem 70-300mm von Canon ist das definitiv nicht möglich. Ich habe sowieso meine Sonnenblenden alle umgekehrt drauf, aber es lange gebraucht bis ich die Tasche entsprechend umgebaut habe dass alles passt.
Ein Raumwunder ist es definitiv nicht. Da der Clou der Tasche ja ist sie auf einer Schulter zu tragen, werde ich sie je nach Bedarf packen, da es sonst gut auf den Rücken gehen wird.
Dann habe ich mir die Halterungen für ein Stativ angesehen. Die entsprechenden Reisverschlüsse aufzubekommen und dann die gut versteckte Kopf-/Fußhalterungen aus den Schlitzen zu bekommen ist extremes Gefummel. Wer sich das ausgedacht hat, der geht in der Regel nicht mit Stativ auf Fototour.
Die eigentliche Verarbeitung macht auf den ersten Blick einen guten Eindruck, aber das wird die Zeit erst zeigen.
Was leider auch nicht geht ist, die Halterungen von PeakDesign lassen sich wegen der Dicke der Gurte nicht befestigen. Schade, solange ich kein Objektiv wechsele will ich auch die Tasche nicht ständig vor und zurück drehen.
Ohne jetzt mit der Tasche jetzt unterwegs gewesen zu sein, bin ich leider etwas entäuscht von dem Produkt. Für mich ist es einfach zu klein und ich bin mir jetzt schon sicher, hin und wieder einen anderen Rucksack auf Tour mitzunehmen.

mujana Veteran Member • Posts: 7,492
Re: Bevis Gear Top Shelf Bag
1

Peter Sch wrote:

Ich habe meine Tasche heute bekommen.

Zuerst habe ich mich auch damit beschäftigt die Tasche über die Schulter auf den Rücken zu bekommen um dann in den TopShelf-Modus zu kommen.
Ich gebe zu ich habe es inzwischen mehrfach wieder vergessen und musste mir das entsprechende Video hierzu ansehen.

Dann ging es ans Befüllen der Tasche. Hier merkte ich schnell, dass die Tasche um einiges kleiner ist als meine bisherigen Rucksäcke. Bisher standen alle meine Objektive ohne Probleme im Rucksack, mit meinem 70-300mm von Canon ist das definitiv nicht möglich. Ich habe sowieso meine Sonnenblenden alle umgekehrt drauf, aber es lange gebraucht bis ich die Tasche entsprechend umgebaut habe dass alles passt.
Ein Raumwunder ist es definitiv nicht. Da der Clou der Tasche ja ist sie auf einer Schulter zu tragen, werde ich sie je nach Bedarf packen, da es sonst gut auf den Rücken gehen wird.
Dann habe ich mir die Halterungen für ein Stativ angesehen. Die entsprechenden Reisverschlüsse aufzubekommen und dann die gut versteckte Kopf-/Fußhalterungen aus den Schlitzen zu bekommen ist extremes Gefummel. Wer sich das ausgedacht hat, der geht in der Regel nicht mit Stativ auf Fototour.
Die eigentliche Verarbeitung macht auf den ersten Blick einen guten Eindruck, aber das wird die Zeit erst zeigen.
Was leider auch nicht geht ist, die Halterungen von PeakDesign lassen sich wegen der Dicke der Gurte nicht befestigen. Schade, solange ich kein Objektiv wechsele will ich auch die Tasche nicht ständig vor und zurück drehen.
Ohne jetzt mit der Tasche jetzt unterwegs gewesen zu sein, bin ich leider etwas entäuscht von dem Produkt. Für mich ist es einfach zu klein und ich bin mir jetzt schon sicher, hin und wieder einen anderen Rucksack auf Tour mitzunehmen.

Dat klinkt goed en ik spreek Duits, maar misschien is het mogelijk om te communiceren in een taal die hier gebruikelijk is en de meesten begrijpen? Engels dus?

So….English maybe?

 mujana's gear list:mujana's gear list
Sigma DP3 Merrill Sony a7R IV Zeiss Batis 85mm F1.8 Sony FE 16-35mm F2.8 +9 more
NewVu New Member • Posts: 22
Re: Bevis Gear Top Shelf Bag
1

I have mine too. I like it a lot but it's not perfect. There was a lot of thought put into it. The zippers could be much better. If you pack the bag even just moderately, the zippers are hard to pull and feel like they won't last.

This bag requires a lot of customization to get right. Out of box, the "T-section" is really odd as the area for the camera box is meant for a camera that is no deeper than a couple inches. They provide a ton of dividers to make up your own sections. However, there isn't a lot of room in this bag and there are some restrictions in placing them (because the dividers are almost all square dividers and there is the button locking mechanism that you have to work around).

Maybe I was expecting the bag to hold more but I was disappointed in how much the bag can carry. What I have in the main area of the bag: Canon EOS R5 body. 35 mm 1.8 lens. 15-30 2.8 Tamron lens. 85mm 1.4 lens. Light meter. There are a lot of little pockets but they're not as practical with filling with stuff because of the tight fits. Like they're meant for instruction manuals and other thin things. I do put things like batteries and mounts but reaching for them is a bit awkward.

There is no way a person with a 16" laptop can fit in this bag. Yes, it can probably fit the 16" screen, but a 16" laptop has some thickness to it and there's no way it could fit. I have a Microsoft Surface Pro 7 which is basically a 12.4" tablet with a detachable keyboard. It does fit but the zippers are hard to pull when the machine is in the pocket. So I basically leave it unzipped. It definitely won't fall out due to the snugness.

It sounds like I don't like the bag but I really do. Now on to the good stuff. It's pretty good as a messenger bag but the cushioned part of the strap needs to be where the strap falls on the shoulder.

The "hook" or premise for the bag, being able to swing from a messenger bag to a platform where you can change your lens and set up your camera is genius. Every other bag requires that you have to deal with the quick access or put the bag down.

Also with this bag, I can't imagine accidentally having things spill out of the bag (like some of the other bags where if you don't zip up, things will fall out). I have a Canon bag that's kind of like a rigid carpenter's bag with the handle on top. And if the straps aren't buckled in, everything spills out when you pull the handle. I also have a backpack with an outside big flap. And if you don't zipper it, a lot spills out when you lift the bag.

I do like how it can be either a messenger bag or a backpack but advertising it as quickly being able to switch between the two is a stretch. It does work well as both a backpack and a messenger bag. Adjustability as a backpack is okay but not as easy as a normal backpack.

I also love how the bag is like a square with some firm skeleton and can sit standing up vertically and horizontally. And of course you can lay it flat.

I wish there was some type of instruction manual because there are so many little features of the bag. I do like how it can hold a tripod. At first, I thought the little pockets were worthless zipper decorations until I really dug in there and finally found the straps.

So the big question is, would I buy it again? I think so? The premise of the bag is what I like and what would keep me coming back. It's not like you're constantly pulling things out of a bag and switching lenses and stuff. But I can remember so many situations where I needed to do just that and it wasn't a convenient or clean place to put your bag down to do it. I just wish there was more room in the bag.

EDIT:  After using the bag more, I can appreciate the care it took in making this bag.  I did some rearranging to suit my needs more (though it didn't free up more space).  Kudos to Matt and Nycol and best wishes in their endeavor.  Still wished for a bit more room but the bag is well made and I would definitely buy it again if it ends up being durable.  I do worry about the zippers still.

mujana Veteran Member • Posts: 7,492
Re: Bevis Gear Top Shelf Bag
1

NewVu wrote:

I have mine too. I like it a lot but it's not perfect. There was a lot of thought put into it. The zippers could be much better. If you pack the bag even just moderately, the zippers are hard to pull and feel like they won't last.

This bag requires a lot of customization to get right. Out of box, the "T-section" is really odd as the area for the camera box is meant for a camera that is no deeper than a couple inches. They provide a ton of dividers to make up your own sections. However, there isn't a lot of room in this bag and there are some restrictions in placing them (because the dividers are almost all square dividers and there is the button locking mechanism that you have to work around).

Maybe I was expecting the bag to hold more but I was disappointed in how much the bag can carry. What I have in the main area of the bag: Canon EOS R5 body. 35 mm 1.8 lens. 15-30 2.8 Tamron lens. 85mm 1.4 lens. Light meter. There are a lot of little pockets but they're not as practical with filling with stuff because of the tight fits. Like they're meant for instruction manuals and other thin things. I do put things like batteries and mounts but reaching for them is a bit awkward.

There is no way a person with a 16" laptop can fit in this bag. Yes, it can probably fit the 16" screen, but a 16" laptop has some thickness to it and there's no way it could fit. I have a Microsoft Surface Pro 7 which is basically a 12.4" tablet with a detachable keyboard. It does fit but the zippers are hard to pull when the machine is in the pocket. So I basically leave it unzipped. It definitely won't fall out due to the snugness.

It sounds like I don't like the bag but I really do. Now on to the good stuff. It's pretty good as a messenger bag but the cushioned part of the strap needs to be where the strap falls on the shoulder.

The "hook" or premise for the bag, being able to swing from a messenger bag to a platform where you can change your lens and set up your camera is genius. Every other bag requires that you have to deal with the quick access or put the bag down.

Also with this bag, I can't imagine accidentally having things spill out of the bag (like some of the other bags where if you don't zip up, things will fall out). I have a Canon bag that's kind of like a rigid carpenter's bag with the handle on top. And if the straps aren't buckled in, everything spills out when you pull the handle. I also have a backpack with an outside big flap. And if you don't zipper it, a lot spills out when you lift the bag.

I do like how it can be either a messenger bag or a backpack but advertising it as quickly being able to switch between the two is a stretch. It does work well as both a backpack and a messenger bag. Adjustability as a backpack is okay but not as easy as a normal backpack.

I also love how the bag is like a square with some firm skeleton and can sit standing up vertically and horizontally. And of course you can lay it flat.

I wish there was some type of instruction manual because there are so many little features of the bag. I do like how it can hold a tripod. At first, I thought the little pockets were worthless zipper decorations until I really dug in there and finally found the straps.

So the big question is, would I buy it again? I think so? The premise of the bag is what I like and what would keep me coming back. It's not like you're constantly pulling things out of a bag and switching lenses and stuff. But I can remember so many situations where I needed to do just that and it wasn't a convenient or clean place to put your bag down to do it. I just wish there was more room in the bag.

EDIT: After using the bag more, I can appreciate the care it took in making this bag. I did some rearranging to suit my needs more (though it didn't free up more space). Kudos to Matt and Nycol and best wishes in their endeavor. Still wished for a bit more room but the bag is well made and I would definitely buy it again if it ends up being durable. I do worry about the zippers still.

Thank you for this informative post!

 mujana's gear list:mujana's gear list
Sigma DP3 Merrill Sony a7R IV Zeiss Batis 85mm F1.8 Sony FE 16-35mm F2.8 +9 more
olstrup Veteran Member • Posts: 4,099
Re: Bevis Gear Top Shelf Bag
1

This bag / backpack is a commendable attempt to unite the virtures of both the accesability of the gear in shoulder bags like Domke, Billingham and a lot others without needing to put the bag down, and backpacks which usually are much more comfortable to carry for longer time spans than shoulder bags and a must for heavy loads.

Despite its virtues, this Bevis backpack has a couple of points I don't really like. Ordinary YKK zippers seems to be used and that combined with no cover over the zippers creates a risk of water seeping in through the zippers. I would have preferred to have the Bevis being made of water proof material instead of resorting to a ""raincoat". I suspect that slinging the backpack from the back to the from and holding it in that position puts a lot of strain on the straps which has to be extra ruggedly made to last. I would be a little worried about the opening mechanism which is just a push button. There could be a risk of activating it involuntarily (especially when it becomes worn and its action gets softer). The "swing around" radius when moving it from the back to the front of your body may make it less convenient for use in crowds or when you want to work "stealth".

My back likes the backpack a lot better than shoulder bags and I have three of them in different sizes. But I hate that I can't work out of them without putting them down. I am also a little uneasy carrying them in crowds where I can't se what goes on literally behind my back. One of my backpacks opens up towards my back and not the outside world. This protects better against pickpockets but makes it harder to access the gear.

For lighter loads and shorter time spans I prefer shoulder bags. Through 40 years I have been through Tenba, Tamrac, LowePro, Domke and Billingham bags. I have ended at the latter. The Billingham bags are waterproof by themself (no need to draw out a "raincoat"), they have top flaps which goes down the sides (protecting against rain) and have water proof zippers. They have a stud closing mechanism which is completely silent (I don't like the "ritsch" of velcro, the "click" of clasps nor he "ring" of the Domke metal carabins) and they can be opened and closed with one hand (when the leather has softened after a little while). They are easy to work out of. Detachable side pockets are available for many of the models for that occationally extra lens or flash. The camera inserts has female velcro properties all over making placement of the dividers flexible. The camera inserts can be removed and the bag used for anything else. And oh - I like their old school colonial military styling with leather and brass hardware (but I know it's not for everyone). They are not cheap but they are very well made and rugged and can last for many, many years. I have owned two of mine for more than 20 years.

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"Sharpness is a bourgeois concept." (Henri Cartier-Bresson)

NewVu New Member • Posts: 22
Re: Bevis Gear Top Shelf Bag
1

There's no way to activate the button by accident as it's flush and requires a significant push to activate it. It should be durable because it's built just like the racecar hood one which is designed to hold down a hood at 200mph. Meanwhile, there is no force on the camera one until you press it so this mechanism should last.

There is no need to swing and the radius is no more than personal space. I've done it in tight spots like corridors and no problems. If it causes problems, then the person is invading your personal space.

I too prefer backpack mode for long jaunts and this is comfortable but you lose the top shelf mode when in backpack mode.

NewVu New Member • Posts: 22
Re: Bevis Gear Top Shelf Bag

Here is my current setup (well, actually, I recently filled in those empty sections.

Padaung New Member • Posts: 6
Re: Bevis Gear Top Shelf Bag

Thanks for sharing how you've set up the compartments.

I've had to try a variety of arrangements, I'm mostly happy with how I have it setup now. However, with the overhang from the flip open lid around the edege, I do find getting items out from those areas (notably the two lenses bottom left and bottom right in the photo) fiddly and not that quick or smooth. I wonder if that will become easier with use as the edges soften over time making it easier to move items in and out?

The orange item in my photo is my collasable cofee mug. I usualy tuck my extra camera batteries in there too.

My flash fits in where my pac-a-mac is in this photo, so for indoor events I'd pack that there instead, and a MagMod modifier would go where the orange coffee mug is.
Filters and spare memory cards go in the front pockets.

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